Fathers and sons

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and swarthy, in a brown tailed coat with brass buttons and a pink handkerchief, entered the room. He grinned, went up to kiss Arcady's hand and, having bowed to the guest, retreated to the door and put his hands behind his back. ...
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Fathers and Sons

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
and swarthy, in a brown tailed coat with brass buttons and a pink handkerchief, entered the room. He grinned, went up to kiss Arcady's hand and, having bowed to the guest, retreated to the door and put his hands behind his back. 'Here he is, Prokofyich,' Nicholas Petrovich began. 'He has arrived at last.... Well? How do you find him?' 'Looking his best,' the old servitor replied, grinning once again. Then knitting his thick brows, he inquired significantly: 'Do you wish me to lay the table, sir?' 'Yes, yes, please. But, Eugene Vassilich, wouldn't you like to retire to your room first?' 'No thank you, I have no need. But will you be so good as to have my luggage taken there, and this little garment too?' he added, pulling off his travelling coat. 'Certainly. Prokofyich, will you see to the gentleman's coat?' With a look of slight perplexity on his face, Prokofyich picked up Bazarov's 'little garment' and, holding it with both hands high above his head, tiptoed out of the room. 'Now what about you, Arcady? Do you wish to retire for a moment?' ClYes, I must tidy myself,' Arcady replied. He was about to direct his steps to the door when, at that instant, in came a man of medium height, dressed in an English suit of dark material, a fashionable cravat, and patent-leather shoes. It was Paul Petrovich Kirsanov. His appearance suggested that he might be forty-five: his grey, close-trimmed hair shone dark as silver; his bilious, unwrinkled face, whose lines were unusually symmetrical and clean-cut as though carved by a fine, light chisel, bore the traces of exceptional good looks: his black, glowing, almond-shaped eyes were particularly attractive. The whole mien of Arcady's uncle, elegant and well-bred in appearance, had preserved a youthful uprightness and a certain soa...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781178632248
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 8/27/2011
  • Pages: 258
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Read an Excerpt


and swarthy, in a brown tailed coat with brass buttons and a pink handkerchief, entered the room. He grinned, went up to kiss Arcady's hand and, having bowed to the guest, retreated to the door and put his hands behind his back. 'Here he is, Prokofyich,' Nicholas Petrovich began. 'He has arrived at last.... Well? How do you find him?' 'Looking his best,' the old servitor replied, grinning once again. Then knitting his thick brows, he inquired significantly: 'Do you wish me to lay the table, sir?' 'Yes, yes, please. But, Eugene Vassilich, wouldn't you like to retire to your room first?' 'No thank you, I have no need. But will you be so good as to have my luggage taken there, and this little garment too?' he added, pulling off his travelling coat. 'Certainly. Prokofyich, will you see to the gentleman's coat?' With a look of slight perplexity on his face, Prokofyich picked up Bazarov's 'little garment' and, holding it with both hands high above his head, tiptoed out of the room. 'Now what about you, Arcady? Do you wish to retire for a moment?' ClYes, I must tidy myself,' Arcady replied. He was about to direct his steps to the door when, at that instant, in came a man of medium height, dressed in an English suit of dark material, a fashionable cravat, and patent-leather shoes. It was Paul Petrovich Kirsanov. His appearance suggested that he might be forty-five: his grey, close-trimmed hair shone dark as silver; his bilious, unwrinkled face, whose lines were unusually symmetrical and clean-cut as though carved by a fine, light chisel, bore the traces of exceptional good looks: his black, glowing, almond-shaped eyes were particularly attractive. The whole mien of Arcady'suncle, elegant and well-bred in appearance, had preserved a youthful uprightness and a certain soa...
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2002

    Great

    A wonderful masterpiece. Turgenev paints the nihilistic charector of bazarov in poetic and realistic way. One of the finest books I have ever read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Excellent prose

    The story is an interesting introduction to Russian life in the 19th century, as well as a good study of generational differences, but the best part of this novel is the writing. There were numerous turns of phrase that I loved, and I found it highly entertaining in spots.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2012

    Pretty good

    Had to read it for school, frightened of russian novels until i read this. Fairly easy to follow, great characterizaton and theme!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2005

    Lessons Forgotten

    Fathers and Sons shows the timeless cycle of intergenerational rebellion and the resulting alientation of the generations. Written at the time of the emancipation of the Russian serfs, it deals with a self-proclaimed liberal father and his son, who under the influence of his brilliant friend, dismisses his father's liberal virtues as sentimentality. As with much Russian literature of the era, the story unfolds against a fascinating background with institutions and characters that are unfamiliar to Western readers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2005

    Nihilism dissected

    FATHERS AND SONS treats Nihilism far more succinctly than any book I can think of and brought the idea to the ordinary mind through true to life characters that we can relate to. It is important because the ideas and methods of the most notorious Nihilists-Nechayev is considered to be very important by Al-Qaeda and other terrorist organizations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2004

    Generation Gap and Nihilism

    This novel deals with two main themes: On the one hand the natural conflict between different generations, and on the other the philosophy of nihilism, which professes a kind of utilitarianism based on natural science. Character opposition and plot structure is vital to interpreting the work; there is great irony in Bazarov's rather anticlimactic death. The world will go on without him. Turgenev is unfortunately stuck in the shadow of two other 19th century Russian realists...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2004

    Okay but not great

    I thought this book was really boring, sometimes it was interesting to read though. The end was much more interesting to read than the beginning

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2003

    Hmmmmm.... can't come up with a headline, sorry

    I just finished reading this book (in Russian, not in English :)). I think that, although lots of people simply say that 'it's a great book', it has a really deep message and meaning, and it's really not that easy to understand. But seriously, I liked this book! I think that it's quite different when you read the translation, though.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2001

    Funny Nihilism

    This book has a few interesting ideas, including the introduction of the word 'nihilism.' The main character is somehow a mix between a Mark Twain hero and Hamlet. Anyway, it reads fast; so read it -- fast.

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    Posted October 3, 2009

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    Posted March 8, 2009

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    Posted June 20, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2011

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    Posted October 29, 2008

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