FBI 100 Years: An Unofficial History

FBI 100 Years: An Unofficial History

by Henry M. Holden
     
 

FBI 100 YEARS: AN UNOFFICIAL HISTORY covers them all: the spies and saboteurs, the revolutionaries and fugitives, the mob bosses, gangsters, and petty criminals with colorful nicknames and big-time aspirations, the public and private life of J. Edgar Hoover as well as his now notorious secret files, the Hollywood blacklists, the political assassinations

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Overview

FBI 100 YEARS: AN UNOFFICIAL HISTORY covers them all: the spies and saboteurs, the revolutionaries and fugitives, the mob bosses, gangsters, and petty criminals with colorful nicknames and big-time aspirations, the public and private life of J. Edgar Hoover as well as his now notorious secret files, the Hollywood blacklists, the political assassinations, Ruby Ridge, Waco, and domestic surveillance in post-9/11 America.

Henry M. Holden, author of To Be an FBI Special Agent, traces the history of Federal Bureau of Investigation, the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice, including its  power, notable cases, and controversies through the years.

The dramatic story told in FBI 100 YEARS: AN UNOFFICIAL HISTORY also includes how the FBI reacted to the Red Scare of the 1950s and civil unrest in the 1960s, and does not shy away from examining some of the more controversial tactics and surveillance methods used by the Bureau over its century of crime fighting. Author Henry M. Holden explores dozens of categories of criminal activities that fall under its broad investigative authority, and takes a look at the FBI in American popular culture.

 

·         Teddy Roosevelt’s trust-busting detective force

·         Gangbusters and spybusters

·         J. Edgar Hoover’s secret files

·         Blacklists, blackmail, and McCarthyism

·         Civil rights and political unrest in the 1960s

·         Bringing down the syndicate: investigating organized crime

·         Ruby Ridge, Waco, and other disasters

·         Domestic surveillance and wiretapping

 

 

HENRY M. HOLDEN was granted numerous interviews with active agents, allowed to pore through the FBI’s historic photo archives, and given the most access it has ever granted a private individual to prepare this one and only published history marking the 100th anniversary of the Bureau’s founding. A veteran law enforcement officer himself, Holden served as a sworn deputy from 1979 to 1981 in the Orange County, Florida, sheriff’s department. He now resides in northern New Jersey.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Midwest Book Review, April 2008
"FBI 100 Years offers an up-close look at the best and worst moments in the history of one of the world's most famous law enforcement agencies. Although it is largely a positive picture Holden presents of the agency, he doesn't duck controversial issues such as surveillance methods. Not only are Hoover's notorious filed addressed but also the rumors about the director's supposedly X-rated private life. Featuring 300 color and black and white photos, FBI 100 Years is a pictorial treasure-trove of images that will delight anyone interested in American law enforcement. Undoubtedly books more critical of the agency will be released this year, since this is an important FBI anniversary. But for a well illustrated and comprehensive overview of the organization, you won't find a better value than FBI 100 Years."

Library Journal, June 1, 2008
"In anticipation of the FBI's centennial this summer, prolific author and law enforcement veteran Holden (To Be an FBI Special Agent) has produced a work for general readers on the ever interesting and controversial history of this primary investigative agency of the U.S. Department of Justice. The book may be defined as an unofficial history, but Holden was granted access to current agents and to the FBI's photo archive to produce a work profusely illustrated with about 300 photographs of equipment, FBI activities, and agents and criminals in action, all of which will fascinate. Chapters cover the early years when Teddy Roosevelt was President, J. Edgar Hoover's long tenure as director, his role in blacklistings and McCarthyism, the pursuit of organized crime, spies, the use of domestic surveillance, and standoffs gone bad. Some of the popular touches include movie posters and comic strips. The book includes all of the FBI's '10 Most Wanted Fugitives' lists and ends with a list of the 51 special agents who died in service, a brief chronology, and definitions of acronyms and abbreviations. Those looking for more critical discussion of the bureau may want to examine Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones' The FBI: A History, but this book will have appeal in both public libraries and specialized collections."


Officer.com, June 2008
"The Federal Bureau of Investigation is considered by many to be the premier law enforcement agency in our country today. Where did it come from? Why was it established? What does it do? Who provides it authority to do so? When I was first approached to review what I saw as essentially a history book, I wasn't too enthused. I mean, that's not my idea of recreational reading. But I kept an open mind and I'm glad I did. This book proved interesting in many ways for anyone who serves (or has served) in law enforcement...if you are interested in law enforcement either through your employment or for another purpose, this book may well provide you some insights you'd not otherwise find."

Library Journal

In anticipation of the FBI's centennial this summer, prolific author and law enforcement veteran Holden (To Be an FBI Special Agent) has produced a work for general readers on the ever interesting and controversial history of this primary investigative agency of the U.S. Department of Justice. The book may be defined as an unofficial history, but Holden was granted access to current agents and to the FBI's photo archive to produce a work profusely illustrated with about 300 photographs of equipment, FBI activities, and agents and criminals in action, all of which will fascinate. Chapters cover the early years when Teddy Roosevelt was President, J. Edgar Hoover's long tenure as director, his role in blacklistings and McCarthyism, the pursuit of organized crime, spies, the use of domestic surveillance, and standoffs gone bad. Some of the popular touches include movie posters and comic strips. The book includes all of the FBI's "10 Most Wanted Fugitives" lists and ends with a list of the 51 special agents who died in service, a brief chronology, and definitions of acronyms and abbreviations. Those looking for more critical discussion of the bureau may want to examine Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones's The FBI: A History, but this book will have appeal in both public libraries and specialized collections.
—Daniel K. Blewett

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760332443
Publisher:
Zenith Press
Publication date:
04/15/2008
Edition description:
First
Pages:
252
Product dimensions:
12.04(w) x 10.70(h) x 1.05(d)

Meet the Author

Henry M. Holden, the author of other MBI titles, To Be an FBI Special Agent and To Be a Crime Scene Investigator, won a 1996 Florida Freelance Writer’s Competition “Honorable Mention,” and received the 1994 “Author’s Award” from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He was also a sworn deputy from 1979 to 1981 in the Orange County, Florida sheriff's department. He resides in Randolph, New Jersey.

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