Fear and Anxiety: The Benefits of Translational Research [NOOK Book]

Overview

Animals, like people, experience fear and avoidance, which can be reliably observed, quantified, and manipulated in almost all species.

Remarkably, as this volume demonstrates, the neural circuits responsible for the acquisition and expression of fear are conserved throughout phylogeny from rodents through nonhuman primates to humans. Thus, what is discovered about the neuroanatomy and physiology of fear in a mouse can be usefully "translated" ...

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Fear and Anxiety: The Benefits of Translational Research

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Overview

Animals, like people, experience fear and avoidance, which can be reliably observed, quantified, and manipulated in almost all species.

Remarkably, as this volume demonstrates, the neural circuits responsible for the acquisition and expression of fear are conserved throughout phylogeny from rodents through nonhuman primates to humans. Thus, what is discovered about the neuroanatomy and physiology of fear in a mouse can be usefully "translated" to a human with an anxiety disorder.

This breakthrough in both neuroscience and mental health research is detailed in 14 fascinating chapters that cover • Conditioned fear -- Many scientists have convincingly documented that the amygdala is the essential brain structure in an animal's exhibition of conditioned fear, with the hippocampus required for contextual memory of conditioned fear. Though debate continues, other studies show that the anatomic and physiological findings about conditioned fear are robustly applicable to other forms of fear.• The brain structures involved in fear -- The data clearly show that the amygdala is the one area most consistently energized in fear responses of nonhuman and human primates. Patients with anxiety disorders have a lower threshold for amygdala activation than do control subjects; thus, fear cues that do not register an amygdala response in most individuals will do so in anxious patients.• Stress effects on brain structure -- It is possible that, based on both animal studies and clinical studies of children and adults, chronic exposure to fear may have deleterious effects on the structural integrity of the brain. The hippocampus appears to be particularly vulnerable, though stress damage may also occur in regions of the prefrontal cortex, such as the anterior cingulate.

The results of translational research can raise concerns that observed negative changes in animal brains might apply to humans, but they can also suggest advantageous interventions, with both psychosocial and psychopharmacology approaches proving effective in reversing not only anxiety disorders but even some changes in the brain.

Best of all, using these scientific models of brain function, we can now see psychotherapy and medication as complementary rather than antagonistic, with each addressing different parts of the same fear circuitry.

The synthesis of knowledge in this groundbreaking work will appeal to practitioners and students alike, and justifies the optimism of its distinguished contributors that psychiatric research is at last in an era in which unprecedented insights will be gained and progress made toward better treatments.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Michael Joel Schrift, D.O., M.A.(University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: There has been enormous progress in the understanding of the neurobiological substrates of fear and the human anxiety disorders. This book is a tour guide to the current scientific models of anxiety and how basic science findings are providing insights and eventually help for those suffering from these common ailments. The book was developed from papers given at 92nd meeting of the American Psychopathological Association in March 2002. Written and edited by influential researchers in the field, the book is a very valuable contribution to psychiatry.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide the reader a synthesis of basic neuroscience findings with the current therapeutic approaches to anxiety. The editor hopes that this synthesis of knowledge will lead to better treatments for fear and anxiety disorders.
Audience: "The intended audience is clinicians in the field. Psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric residents, and graduate students in psychology interested in anxiety disorders would find this book very useful. "
Features: There are many outstanding chapters written by giants in the field: LeDoux on "synaptic self," McEwen on stress and brain damage, Weissman on high-risk studies, North on post-trauma, Gorman on neuroanatomy of panic, and Barlow on psychological treatments amongst other excellent chapters. Each chapter ends with relevant and up-to-date references and the index section is helpful.
Assessment: This is really an outstanding book covering the contemporary conceptualization of the anxiety disorders. Every psychiatrist should want to read this book!

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585626946
  • Publisher: American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/20/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 302
  • Product dimensions: 0.60 (w) x 0.90 (h) x 0.05 (d)
  • File size: 5 MB

Table of Contents

Preface. Synaptic self: conditioned fear, developmental adversity, and the anxious individual. Does stress damage the brain? Neuropsychobiology of the variable foraging demand paradigm in nonhuman primates. Offspring at high risk for anxiety and depression: preliminary findings from a three-generation study. Pathophysiology of anxiety: a developmental psychobiological perspective. Psychiatric effects of disasters and terrorism: empirical basis from study of the Oklahoma City bombing. Neuroanatomy of panic disorder: implications of functional imaging in fear conditioning. Neuroimaging studies in nonhuman primates reared under early stressful conditions: implications for mood and anxiety disorders. Neurotoxic effects of childhood trauma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies of pediatric maltreatment-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder versus nontraumatized children with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Scientific basis of psychological treatments for anxiety disorders: past, present, and future. New molecular targets for antianxiety interventions. Dissociating components of anxious behavior in young rhesus monkeys: a precursor to genetic studies. The anatomy of fear: microcircuits of the lateral amygdala. The amygdala and social behavior: what's fear got to do with it? Index.

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