Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Other American Stories

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and Other American Stories

4.8 19
by Hunter S. Thompson, Ralph Steadman
     
 

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First published in Rolling Stone magazine in 1971, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is Hunter S. Thompson's savagely comic account of what happened to this country in the 1960s. It is told through the writer's account of an assignment he undertook with his attorney to visit Las Vegas and "check it out." The book stands as the final word on the highs and

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Overview

First published in Rolling Stone magazine in 1971, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is Hunter S. Thompson's savagely comic account of what happened to this country in the 1960s. It is told through the writer's account of an assignment he undertook with his attorney to visit Las Vegas and "check it out." The book stands as the final word on the highs and lows of that decade, one of the defining works of our time, and a stylistic and journalistic tour de force. As Christopher Lehmann-Haupt wrote in The New York Times, it has "a kind of mad, corrosive prose poetry that picks up where Norman Mailer's An American Dream left off and explores what Tom Wolfe left out."
        This Modern Library edition features Ralph Steadman's original drawings and three companion pieces selected by Dr. Thompson: "Jacket Copy for Fear and Loath-
ing in Las Vegas," "Strange Rumblings in Aztlan," and "The Kentucky Derby Is Deca-
dent and Depraved."

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Editorial Reviews

Crawford Woods
"We werearound Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold." The hold deepens for two days, and the language keeps pace for 200 pages, in what is by far the best book yet written on the decade of dope gone by...It is, as well, a custom-crafted study of paranoia, a spew from the 1960s and -in all its hysteria, insolence, insult and rot- a desperate and important book, a wired nightmare, the funniest piece of American prose since Naked Lunch. Books of the Century, The New York Times,July, 1972

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679602989
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/28/1998
Series:
Modern Library Series
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
130,423
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Hunter S. Thompson (July 18, 1937 — February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. He was known for his flamboyant writing style, most notably deployed in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which blurred the distinctions between writer and subject, fiction and nonfiction.

The best source on Thompson's writing style and personality is Thompson himself. His books include Hell's Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga (1966), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream (1972), Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 (1973); The Great Shark Hunt: Strange Tales from a Strange Time (1979); The Curse of Lono (1983); Generation of Swine, Gonzo Papers Vol. 2: Tales of Shame and Degradation in the 80's (1988); and Songs of the Doomed (1990).

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
July 18, 1937
Date of Death:
February 20, 2005
Place of Birth:
Louisville, Kentucky
Place of Death:
Woody Creek, Colorado
Education:
U.S. Air Force, honorably discharged in 1957

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Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and Other American Stories 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MrVanisawesome More than 1 year ago
Nathan James Mikesell DRUGS! DRUGS! Aparently this book was the American dream in the 60's, I wouldn’t know I’m 18. For a brief description its about two men one a news reporter the other his lawyer. Their journey begins with a road trip to Vegas too cover a news story about a desert race, really nothing to do with the whole story. On the way there and in Vegas they do a countless number of drugs and a abundance amount of alcohol. Its just about how the drugs feel and not being sober for a few weeks.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Salem_XIII More than 1 year ago
If you are going to buy this book I would suggestion giving this version I thought. I personally like this one the best because it also includes two other pieces of Thompson's writing. The second one is the first thing I ever read by Thompson. Also, The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved is the first piece of "gonzo" work Thompson ever did. This book overall is a most have for any Thompson fan and a great place to start for readers interested in his writings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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fattrucker More than 1 year ago
You really had to be there, the seventies I mean. You see, what really made the seventies even possible was drinking and driving. And the drugs. And the fact that the cops hadn't gotten up to speed in terms of enforcement yet. It was a crazy time when outlandish behaviour was tolerated, expected even, and nothing was considered over the line. It's one thing to make that journey into the dark heart of the American dream, it's another thing altogether to come back and tell the tale. Few qualify. No one has done it quite so well. RIP Hunter Thompson.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ckcSC More than 1 year ago
Buy the ticket,take the ride.A must read !!!!!!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The story is an account of Thompson and attorney Oscar Zeta Acosta¿s trip to Las Vegas. They are referred to as Raoul Duke and Dr. Gonzo respectively. Thompson was interviewing Acosta for a story he was working on for Rolling Stone. It was a story on the murder of Ruben Salazar by Los Angeles police during the National Chicano Moratorium March against the Vietnam War. Thompson was also supposed to write photo captions for a race in Las Vegas for Sports Illustrated. Thompson thought that if he got Acosta out of LA he would be more inclined to talk openly for the interview. Thompson was hired to write 250 words for the photo captions, but when he submitted what turned out to be a 2,500 word manuscript, Sports Illustrated ¿aggressively rejected¿ it. He then ended up having it featured in Rolling Stone before it was put out in novel form. This book is one of my favorites of all time not just for its writing style, which I adore, but also for its overall meaning and themes which can get lost in all of the violence, drug use and insanity. This book is not for everyone and definitely not for the faint of heart. It is a screaming roller coaster of insanity that eventually spirals out of control and crashes. It can be very ugly and depressing, but at the same time I still consider it one of the best things I¿ve ever read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas How many of us had dreamed with leaving everything and running away to live a life full of excess, cutting with your normal and ordinary life? Wouldn¿t you like to stop the monotony of your every day life? Then ¿Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas¿ is a book that you should read. The book can be the reflection of the life of more than one that left everything in search of the so called ¿American Dream¿. The uncertainty and locomotion that Hunter S. Thompson gives to this story is unique. The story of a magazine writer and his attorney in the search of new life style is the main idea of the story. A life full of excess in a time that would give all that you need to adopt this life style.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hunter S. Thompson's masterpiece, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, is not only a fine work that showcases the beginning stages of Thompson's innovative invention 'pure Gonzo journalism,' it is also a hilarious fast-paced trip through Las Vegas circa 1971, with some fresh mournings on the death of the Swingin' Sixties and the consequences that the flower children and other survivors will need to face to make it through the seventies. This is NOT A BOOK FOR THE QUEASY OR CLOSEMINDED, yet this is a book of several themes that a wide range of people can enjoy, even the more straightlaced. Those interested in history and politics will enjoy the biting social commentary, those interested in journalism and writing might find the action-filled first person intriguing, and those interested in psychology and drug abuse or drug culture will find 'Duke' an interesting study. Above all, however, this book is about FUN. Thompson admits that he immensely enjoyed writing this story (which is rare, for him), and the whole excursion centers around basically just trying to have a great time, and succeeding despite outside influences... for good or bad. This is also a jaded look at the American Dream. I recommend seeing the movie before AND after reading the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Thompson gets to the heart of America by tripping all the way. I thoroughly enjoy all of his writing, but this had a certain unique branding to it. Sometimes hard to follow, but always entertaining and actually made you look at what America does stand for.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a oh so truthful book sadly to say. It clearly shows the down fall of the American civilization. A dream long since dead and visible in Las Vegas a cheap town where anything goes. I enjoyed this book very much. The detail of the drug usage is real very real. NOT THAT I WOULD KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT THAT. The story also made me sad to realize I live in a long dead dream and the civilization is wa past its prime. Oh what I wouldn't give to be a flower child.