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Fear God And Take Your Own Part
     

Fear God And Take Your Own Part

by Theodore IV Roosevelt
 

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Unless we are thorough going Americans and unless our patriotism is part of the very fiber of our being, we can neither serve God nor take our own part.

~~~

Fear God and Take Your Own Part is a collection of articles Theodore Roosevelt wrote, largely for Metropolitan Magazine, some six years after he left the presidency. The title is another way of

Overview

Unless we are thorough going Americans and unless our patriotism is part of the very fiber of our being, we can neither serve God nor take our own part.

~~~

Fear God and Take Your Own Part is a collection of articles Theodore Roosevelt wrote, largely for Metropolitan Magazine, some six years after he left the presidency. The title is another way of saying that a nation must have the power and will for self-sacrifice as well as the power and will for self-protection. In the book, Roosevelt, who also wrote extensively on the outdoors, vigorously sets forth the "principles of true Americanism" that still reverberate throughout the nation today.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919) was a heroic figure who served as the 26th president of the United States. During his eight years in office, he steered the United States more actively into world politics. Teddy "Rough Riders" Roosevelt was also a military leader, a prosecutor, a naturalist, and a prolific writer.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596054196
Publisher:
Cosimo
Publication date:
11/01/2005
Pages:
420
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.93(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II WARLIKE POWERTHE PREREQUISITE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF SOCIAL VALUES IN December last I was asked to address the American Sociological Congress on "the effect of war and militarism on social values." In sending my answer I pointed out that infinitely the most important fact to remember in connection with the subject in question is that if an unscrupulous, warlike, and militaristic nation is not held in check by the warlike ability of a neighboring non-militaristic and well-behaved nation, then the latter will be spared the necessity of dealing with its own "moral and social values" because it won't be allowed to deal with anything. Until this fact is thoroughly recognized, and the duty of national preparedness by justice-loving nations explicitly acknowledged, there is very little use of solemnly debating such questions as the one which the sociological congress assigned mewhich, in detail, was "How war and militarism affect such social values as the sense of the preciousness of human life; care for child welfare; the conservation of human resources; upper-class concern for the lot of the masses; interest in popular education; appreciation of truth- telling and truth-printing; respect for personality and regard for personal rights." It seems to me positively comic to fail to appreciate, with the example of Belgium before our eyes, that the real question which modern peace-loving nations have to face is not how the militaristic or warlike spirit within their own borders will affect these "values," but how failure on their part to be able to resist the militarism of an unscrupulous neighbor will affect them. Belgium had a very keen sense of the "preciousness of human life"and of "the need for the care of child welfare and the conservation of human resources," and ...

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