Fear of Falling (Vet Volunteers Series #9)

Fear of Falling (Vet Volunteers Series #9)

4.6 19
by Laurie Halse Anderson
     
 

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David is determined to learn to jump on horseback if it kills him. And sometimes he's afraid it might, like when Comet balks and won't go over the crossbar. Now that David's father is back in town, he's promised to teach David how to jump like a champion. But David can't let him know how scared he is. Because there's one thing that scares David more than falling

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Overview

David is determined to learn to jump on horseback if it kills him. And sometimes he's afraid it might, like when Comet balks and won't go over the crossbar. Now that David's father is back in town, he's promised to teach David how to jump like a champion. But David can't let him know how scared he is. Because there's one thing that scares David more than falling off a horse, and that's disappointing his father. Can he overcome his fear, or even talk about it?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
David, featured in "Wild at Heart" #3 Trickster, is front and center in this 9th entry in the series. This twelve-year-old is juggling a lot—his father's move to Texas and subsequent lack of contact with the family, his mother's struggle to keep the family on an even keel, his siblings' response to the family situation, his volunteering with four other adolescents at Dr. Mac's Wild at Heart Animal Clinic, and his love of horseback riding coupled with his fear of jumping. Everything comes to a head when his father returns to town for Thanksgiving weekend after being gone nearly a year. David's love of horses comes from his father and David desperately wants to please his father by being as good a rider/jumper as he is. His recurring nightmare of falling has a double meaning—the obvious one about jumping as well as a subtler one about his relationship with his Dad. Tension builds as he watches his Dad show off, mistreating a beautiful horse as he does; and again when his father gives him a jumping lesson and David is injured. Pressure builds at home as well, as Thanksgiving approaches and David tries to discern why Dad is all of a sudden semi-back in their lives. Is he here to stay? Is it safe to open up to him? The writing is uneven, with stilted dialogue mixed in with some very perceptive observations. Dr. Mac and Mr. Quinn, the owner of the stables, are wise and caring adults; David is lucky to have them to lean on. This is certainly formulaic, but there will be a certain appeal to pre-teen horse lovers. There is an appendix in Dr. Mac's newspaper column with information about horses and jumping. 2001, Pleasant Company, $4.95. Ages 9 to 12. Reviewer: Peg Glisson AGES: 910 11 12

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780836832556
Publisher:
Gareth Stevens Publishing
Publication date:
05/28/2003
Series:
Vet Volunteers Series, #9
Pages:
113
Product dimensions:
6.22(w) x 9.24(h) x 0.53(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Laurie Halse Anderson has received both the Margaret Edwards Award and the ALAN Award for her contributions to young adult literature. She has also been honored by the National Coalition Against Censorship in recognition of her fight to combat the censoring of literature. She is the author of the groundbreaking National Book Award finalist and Printz Honor Book Speak. She is also author of the critically acclaimed YA books Prom, Twitsted, Catalyst, Wintergirls, and The Impossible Knife of Memory. She has also authored a number of middle grade titles including The Vet Volunteers series, and the historical fiction Seeds of America Trilogy, which includes Forge, ALA Best Book for Young Adults Fever 1793, and the National Book Award finalist and Scott O’Dell Award-winner Chains. She and her husband live in northern New York State. Follow Laurie on Twitter @halseanderson and visit her at madwomanintheforest.com.

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