Fear of Math: How to Get over It and Get on with Your Life!

Fear of Math: How to Get over It and Get on with Your Life!

by Claudia Zaslavsky
     
 

Claudia Zaslavsky has helped thousands of men and women understand why math made them miserable. Let her introduce you to real people who, like you, fled from anything to do with math. All of them--White, African American, Asian American, Latino, artist, homemaker, manager, teacher, teenager, or grandparent--came to see that their math troubles were not their fault

Overview

Claudia Zaslavsky has helped thousands of men and women understand why math made them miserable. Let her introduce you to real people who, like you, fled from anything to do with math. All of them--White, African American, Asian American, Latino, artist, homemaker, manager, teacher, teenager, or grandparent--came to see that their math troubles were not their fault. Social stereotypes, poor schools, and well-meaning parents had convinced them that they couldnÕt, or shouldnÕt, do math.       

Claudia Zaslavsky shows you how the school math you dreaded is a far cry from the math you really need in life (and probably know better than you ever suspected)! She gives a host of reassuring methods, drawn from many cultures, for tackling real-world math problems. She explodes the myth that women and minorities are not good at math. With Claudia Zaslavsky’s help, you can see why math matters and how to get over the math barrier that has been holding you back from your goals in life.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Zaslavsky, author of Africa Counts: Number and Pattern in African Culture (1979) and other books and articles on math teaching and phobia, believes that the stereotype of (white) male superiority in mathematics has been used sometimes unthinkingly and sometimes deliberately to disqualify women and minorities from good educational opportunities and jobs. Much of her book is based on excerpts from ``math autobiographies'' in which people describe their good and bad experiences as math students. These stories illustrate how the fear of math is imposed by the attitudes of teachers and society and how overcoming fear can open up new opportunities. Zaslavsky describes some nonthreatening methods of math instruction, and she also includes a list of resources for parents and students. Her work, however, is not so much a self-help book as a discussion about the social effects of math ability stereotypes and inadequate education. If readers see themselves as victims of math discrimination rather than as bad students, they may be encouraged to give math another try. For general collections.-Amy Brunvand, Fort Lewis Coll. Lib., Durango, Col.
Denise Perry Donavin
By exploring the cause for many people's phobia about the study and use of mathematics, then suggesting methods for reducing this anxiety, Zaslavsky will put many readers in control of their academic and daily conflicts with mathematics. Zaslavsky blames bad teachers (and takes little time to explore what makes them bad) in her "math autobiographies" created from her wide-reaching interviews. Zaslavsky examines inequities within school systems and society regarding math and minorities, then offers positive teaching strategies that can be used with young children, elementary and high-school students, and adults. She suggests fun aspects of math that should be taught and offers a number of success stories.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813520902
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication date:
06/01/1994
Pages:
280

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