Fear the Night [NOOK Book]

Overview

A Madman's Obsession Is A City's Nightmare

He comes out when the sun goes down. He's made New York City his shooting gallery. The Night Sniper threatens to increase the body count-unless legendary homicide detective Vin Repetto is willing to engage him in a lethal game of cat and mouse. When the next victim is murdered right before Repetto's eyes, the game is set to begin. But The Night Sniper doesn't realize they're playing by Repetto's rules ...

See more details below
Fear the Night

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.55
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$4.79 List Price

Overview

A Madman's Obsession Is A City's Nightmare

He comes out when the sun goes down. He's made New York City his shooting gallery. The Night Sniper threatens to increase the body count-unless legendary homicide detective Vin Repetto is willing to engage him in a lethal game of cat and mouse. When the next victim is murdered right before Repetto's eyes, the game is set to begin. But The Night Sniper doesn't realize they're playing by Repetto's rules . . .

"A HEART-POUNDING ROLLER COASTER OF A TALE." --Jeffery Deaver on Night Victims

"A PAGE-TURNER . . . TWISTY, CREEPY." --Publishers Weekly (starred review) on Mister X

"LUTZ IS IN RARE FORM." -The New York Times Book Review on Chill of Night

A sniper's bullet kills a lowly theater district shop owner. It's the first of several killings in what becomes a twisted cat-and-mouse game between the "Night Sniper," so-called because he only strikes after sunset, and retired New York detective Vincent Repetto.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
On a warm evening in Manhattan, a sniper's bullet kills a lowly theater district shop owner. It's the first of several killings in what becomes a twisted cat-and-mouse game between the "Night Sniper," so-called because he only strikes after sunset, and retired New York detective Vincent Repetto in Lutz's fast-moving crime thriller. Although the beleaguered detective is straight from central casting and the sniper's motivation is hinted at but never satisfactorily explained, Lutz skillfully brings to life the sniper's various victims. It doesn't matter if the killer's target is a Broadway star on the way up or a homeless person on the way down, in a few pages these people come across as layered and three-dimensional. One wishes Lutz had done as good a job fleshing out his main characters. (Nov.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786028634
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 7/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 56,823
  • File size: 844 KB

First Chapter

FEAR THE NIGHT


By JOHN LUTZ

PINNACLE BOOKS

Copyright © 2011 John Lutz
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-7860-2622-7


Chapter One

He flung open the service door and was on the roof and in the cool, dark vastness of the night. In the building beneath his feet people fought and loved and hated and dreamed, while he lived the dream that was real. He was the one who decided. Below and around him the Theater District glowed, as did the stars above. He was sure that if he tried he could reach up, clutch one of the stars, and plunge it burning into his pocket. The end and the beginning of a dream ...

On the night he died, Marty Akim was selling.

Marty sold anything that would fetch a price, but he specialized in nineteen-dollar watches that he bought for ten dollars.

Warm evenings in New York would find him lounging outside his souvenir shop, Bargain Empire, just off West Forty-fifth Street in the theater district. Inside the crowded shop were lettered T-shirts, cheap umbrellas, plastic Statues of Liberty, Broadway show posters, glass snow globes that played New York tunes while dandrufflike flakes, swirled by shaking, settled among tiny replicas of the buildings Chrysler, Empire State, and Citigroup, towering inches over Rockefeller Center and Grand Central Station. There were plenty of cut-rate laptop computers, digital cameras, cell phones, recorders, and suitcases, many with brand names that seemed familiar at a glance.

Outside the shop, next to a rack of rayon jackets featuring colorful New York scenes, and a table with stacks of sports logo caps and pullovers, was the display of wristwatches. Alongside them, his seamed and friendly face bunched in a perpetual smile, sat Marty in his padded metal folding chair. Marty caught the eye, with his loosened silk tie and his pristine white shirt with its sleeves rolled up, his slicked-back graying hair, and his amiable keen blue eyes. Sitting there gracefully and casually, his legs crossed, a cigarette either wedged between yellowed fingers or tucked loosely in the corner of his mouth, he looked like a once-handsome, aging lounge singer taking a break between sets. A man with tales to tell and eager to tell them for the price of a return smile.

But interesting and approachable as Marty seemed, it was the watches that drew customers, all the glimmer and glitter of gold and silver electroplate and plastic gemstones, colorful watch faces with bright green numerals and hands that looked as if they'd surely glow in the dark. There was something about all that bright, measurable time so closely massed, the tempo of Times Square, the chatter and shuffle and hum and shouts and roar of traffic and pedestrians, all of them moving to some raucous, frantic music punctuated by blaring horns. In the middle of all this happy turmoil was this ordered display of shining metal and geometric precision, and Marty, waiting.

Customers would come and he would talk to them, not pressuring them, not at first. Where were they from? What shows had they seen? Were they having fun? Sure, he could recommend a restaurant or direct them to the nearest subway stop. All the while they'd be sneaking peeks at the watches, the Rodexes, Hambiltons, Bulovis, and Mowados. (The cheap, illegal knockoffs bearing correctly spelled brand names were kept out of sight beneath the false bottom of a showcase inside the shop, sold only to customers who'd been referred to Marty and could be trusted.) Often Marty's customers were a couple, a man and woman, and the woman would invariably find something that interested her, squint at it, pick it up, then hold it to her ear, like with this couple.

"They're all quartz movement, ma'am." Marty smiling wider and whiter, beginning to work his magic on the two of them. "Factory seconds of quality brands—I'll leave you to guess which brands—some of them with flaws you'd need a microscope to see. But ordinarily they're expensive and the people who buy them expect perfection. Perfect they're not, but then neither are you and me, and I know these watches are closer to heaven than I'll ever get."

"They're reasonably priced," said the woman. She was about forty, short, with a chunky build and dyed red hair. The man was older, lanky, with rough hands and a lot of hair sprouting from his nostrils. He had sad eyes and a wheezy way of breathing.

"I notice the lady's not wearing a watch," Marty said to the man, trying to draw him into conversation.

"I left it in the hotel safe," the woman said. "Bob warned me I might get robbed if I wore my good jewelry out on the streets."

"Bob's wise to advise caution," Marty said, nodding sagely to Bob, both of them seasoned by wide experience. "What New York women do is wear their cheaper but still high-quality jewelry when they go out at night."

"Makes sense," said the woman.

"And they dress stylishly but discreetly, like you're dressed. Attractive women need to be careful. Bob knows what I mean." Marty wished Bob would mention her name. That would make things easier.

He'd get the woman's name, he decided. And he'd sell her a watch. He could sell air to these two.

It was a challenge Marty enjoyed, selling watches on a fine warm night like tonight, practicing the basics of his trade. He stood up so he could point to a Rodex. "That one would suit Marie just fine," he said to Bob, "with its dainty band."

"He better not give it to anybody named Marie," the woman said.

Marty looked confused. "I thought I heard Bob call you—"

"Forget this crap and let's get going," Bob said to the woman. Bob catching on.

"I dunno, Bob, Some of these—"

"We're gonna be late." Bob edged away, as if he might pull his companion along with some kind of magnetism.

Marty was still smiling. "I understand your cynicism, Bob."

"It's not cynicism, it's reality."

"Most of the time, I'm sure."

Bob ignored him. "C'mon, Ellie."

"If you're not interested, that's okay." Marty still with the smile. Fuck the both of you.

"Nice patter but no sale," Bob said. He gripped Ellie's elbow and guided her away from the watch display, almost getting tangled with a couple of teenagers in gangsta pants swishing past. Ellie glanced back at Marty and grinned and shrugged: What're you gonna do? She didn't mind being taken, if she was having fun and would come away with something.

Bob had been like a brick wall. Marty figured he must be some kind of salesman himself, big farmer type, maybe sold tractors in Iowa or some place where there were crops. He put the couple out of his mind and neatened up his display where Ellie had inadvertently rearranged some of the watches.

There was this crack! that didn't belong. Louder than the din of the street, like a crisp clap of thunder that bounced and echoed down the avenue.

Marty would have wondered what made the sound, but that was when he had his heart attack.

At least that's what Marty thought it was at first. A sudden sharp pain in his chest, a hard time breathing. Not heartburn. Too painful. So painful he could hardly move. It even hurt when he absently lifted his hand to massage the lump of pain in his chest.

He felt wetness. Looked down. His hand was red. So was his tie and the front of his bright white shirt he'd bought just yesterday on sale at Filene's Basement. His fingers danced over his chest, probed.

Huh? He'd been shot.

Shot! Oh, Christ!

Bob the farmer had shot him. That was all Marty could think of. He looked around. Bob and Ellie were nowhere to be seen. People had stopped streaming past the shop and were standing staring at him. He felt light-headed. And breathing was even more of an effort.

He sat down cross-legged on the sidewalk in front of his watch display.

Blood all over the concrete.

My blood ...

Marty was recovering from his shock enough to be terrified.

A doctor visiting from Toronto with a woman not his wife was walking past and saw what was happening.

He hurried to help Marty but it was too late.

Time had stopped for Marty.

Chapter Two

A spring shower that was almost mist was falling the next evening when Assistant Chief Lou Melbourne wrestled his bulk out of a cab in front of Vincent Repetto's residence on Bank Street in the Village.

Repetto, who'd gone to a living room window to see if it was still raining, noticed Melbourne crossing the street. The two men were about the same age—midfifties—but almost exact opposites. Melbourne was short and very much overweight, balding, with a pug face and clothes that were always a size too small. He had on a blue jacket that didn't look water resistant, and he walked fast for an obese man and with an economy of motion.

Repetto was several inches over six feet, lean and with long arms and big hands. The progeny of a Dutch mother and an Italian father, he still had most of his dark hair, but it was fast turning a gunmetal gray. His eyebrows, graying but not as fast, were permanently arched in a way that gave him an expression of alert and aggressive curiosity. I will get to the truth, said his arched gaze. His clothes tended to black and gray and were well tailored, but tonight he was wearing faded jeans and a white pullover with NYPD on its chest.

Melbourne, crossing the street diagonally, saw him watching through the decorative iron bars on the window and raised a hand in a wave. Repetto nodded to him, then left the window to open the door. Two months ago, Melbourne had presented Repetto with an engraved silver platter at one of his many retirement parties. Repetto appreciated it. A man couldn't have too many silver platters.

"Lou, you should have an umbrella," Repetto said, as Melbourne took the concrete steps to the stoop, then hesitated.

"They bring bad luck."

"Like making it rain?"

Melbourne grinned. "Like making it rain harder because you have an umbrella." After wiping the soles of his shoes on the doormat, he shook hands with Repetto. "How you been in your brief retirement, Vin?"

"I haven't quite figured that out yet." Repetto used the handshake to pull Melbourne in out of the rain, then waited while Melbourne worked out of his jacket. Repetto draped the jacket on the antique brass coatrack and ushered Melbourne into the living room.

Repetto and his wife, Lora, lived in a narrow redbrick house that had been built over a hundred years ago. Lora, who was an interior decorator, had chosen almost all the decor and furnishings. The upper floor was her office and sometime storeroom. Living quarters were downstairs.

The living room, where Repetto invited Melbourne to sit on a soft Queen Anne sofa, was furnished eclectically, mixing traditional with Victorian and Early American. On the wall behind the sofa stood a tall nineteenth-century walnut secretary. A Sheraton library table with stacks of books was along another wall, a Cape Cod window seat nearby where Lora sometimes sat sipping tea and looking out at Bank Street. The house was on a quiet, brick-paved block in the West Village, a desirable piece of real estate.

Repetto had married into money. Lora's mother and father had died young in a boating accident and left her well off. She wasn't your usual cop's wife, but then Repetto wasn't your usual cop. He'd risen through the ranks by virtue of his own hard work and ingenuity. When he retired after catching a stray bullet in the lung during a hostage situation that went sour, then being kicked up to captain, he was considered the shrewdest—and toughest—homicide detective in the NYPD. His specialty was serial killers.

When Melbourne was seated, Repetto asked him if he wanted a drink. "Some good eighteen-year-old scotch?"

Melbourne smiled and shook his head no. "I'm on duty, sort of."

Uh-oh. Repetto settled down in a brown leather wing chair facing his old friend and superior officer.

Still smiling, Melbourne glanced around. "I don't see any ashtrays. And I don't smell tobacco. I guess for health reasons you gave up those Cuban cigars you used to smoke. The bad lung and all."

"The lung's pretty much healed. I still get winded too easy, though."

"But still no cigars."

"I allow myself one every few days. The doctors said it's okay as long as I don't inhale."

"Sure they did."

"Other than that, I don't smoke. For Lora."

"She make you lighten up?"

Repetto didn't bother to answer.

"So it's true what they say about life after you retire and you're home with the wife."

"What do they say?"

"She takes over the company."

"Yeah, that's true. She's been a cop's wife over twenty years, Lou. If she doesn't want me to smell up the house with cigar smoke, I won't. She deserves to be spoiled."

"She doesn't want you dying of lung cancer."

"That, too."

Melbourne focused his flesh-padded gray eyes on Repetto. "How'd you and Lora manage it, staying married all this time, you doing the kinda work we do?"

Repetto had to give it some thought. "I don't know for sure. Maybe somewhere along the line we learned how to stay out of each other's way."

"That's an unsatisfactory answer," Melbourne said with a touch of bitterness. Twice-divorced Melbourne.

"Lora's at a meeting with a client," Repetto said. "You wanna come back to my den and we can smoke some cigars?"

Melbourne cocked his head to the side. "You won't get in any trouble?"

Repetto laughed and stood up. "I haven't had a smoke in two days. Haul your ass outta that sofa and come with me." He didn't tell Melbourne the den was the only place he smoked in the house, and he had to make sure there was plenty of ventilation.

Repetto's den was large, carpeted in deep red with thick red drapes, a quiet room, considering it was at street level. There were commendations on the walls, a mounted trout Repetto had caught in Vermont, and several signed and framed publicity photos of Broadway stars.

Repetto walked over to his desk and opened a small mahogany humidor near the green-shaded lamp. He gave Melbourne a Venezuelan cigar and a cutter, then chose a domestic brand for himself. Before lighting the cigar, he went over and opened a window, letting in some dampness and cool night air. Within a few seconds he could feel cross ventilation from the already cracked window on the adjacent wall stir the hairs on his bare forearms.

When he returned to sit in his black leather desk chair, Melbourne had already seated himself in one of the upholstered chairs angled toward the desk and lighted his cigar.

Repetto settled down behind his oversize cherry-wood desk. "You mentioned you were on duty."

"Sort of. Here to ask you about something."

Repetto smiled. "Am I a suspect?"

"I don't believe you lead an exciting enough life now to get in any trouble." Melbourne puffed on his cigar. "This is great. Cuban?"

"Aren't those illegal?"

"A rhetorical question, I'm sure." Melbourne might have winked. He knew Repetto favored and could obtain Cuban cigars. He took another draw and seemed to roll the smoke around in his mouth before exhaling. "What exactly do you do these days?"

"Lora and I go to the theater, dine out with friends, plan on doing some traveling. Things we never had time to do when I was on the job."

"Sounds nice, actually. You always had it good for a cop."

Repetto was getting the idea Melbourne was hesitant to bring up whatever he'd come to discuss. "Get to it, Lou."

"I'm asking you back to the NYPD, or at least to work for us."

Repetto didn't hesitate. "Nope. Lora wouldn't stand for it."

"You'd please her before me?"

"I don't sleep with you."

"You wanna hear the deal?"

"No."

"Okay, here it is. Last night a guy named Martin Akim was shot to death outside his shop in the theater district."

"Marty Akim? Watches?"

"The very Marty."

"Holdup?"

"No. Shot from a distance. Relatively small-caliber bullet, misshapen by bone and the wall it hit after tumbling through Akim. People heard the shot, but the way sound echoes around all those tall buildings and concrete and glass, nobody knows where it came from. Far away, though, not close by."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from FEAR THE NIGHT by JOHN LUTZ Copyright © 2011 by John Lutz. Excerpted by permission of PINNACLE BOOKS. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2005

    A Sure Pleaser

    John Lutz has written another tightly woven thriller which leaves the reader asking for more. In 'Fear the Night', retired detective Vincent Repetto is recruited to lead a team in the hunt for the Night Sniper, a serial killer, with targets determined by long buried revenge. Repetto's involvement is personal and his character is well-developed. Some interesting side stories add punch to the main theme. This is an exciting read, guaranteed to get your heart racing and keep you awake at night.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 18, 2011

    Read them all

    This author is great if you like a good mystery

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2008

    A reviewer

    I give it a three just because I found the killer, victims and homeless guy a lot more interesting than the main characters. They were basically pretty dull...

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Great cat and mouse caper

    The Night Sniper kills the Manhattan store owner making him the third victim. He taunts the police and demands that his only competition retired detective Vincent Repetto oppose him in a game of cat and mouse. Assistant Chief Lou Melbourne begs Lou to come out of retirement, but the former cop says no as he wants to spend time with his beloved wife Lora and their twenty year old daughter Amelia besides he left on disability with a collapsed lung from his last case................... The Night Sniper refuses to accept a no from Vin. To force Vin to participate he kills a friend Dal Bricker in front of Vin. Now the twenty year veteran comes out of retirement to take on a vicious serial killer who sees this as a superheavyweight contest between two champions with similar childhoods only Vin had his beloved aunts to save him............... Though the temperament of the Night Sniper is so similar to other serial killer novels, fans will feel the suspense that builds up until the final confrontation. The story line is action-packed with incidents that seem innocuous and everyday at first turning lethal when the killer acts. Readers will enjoy FEAR THE NIGHT while wondering whether the Night Sniper will kill those close to his opponent as part of his efforts to win his game of death............... Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    Good!

    Enjoyed

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

    Scarpaw

    The frt second and third result. *she says tears straming down her face as e thins of someone*

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Sweetmist

    *licks the kit's head* It will be ok little one. *chews up burdock root. She spits it out and spreads some on the kit's wounds*~Sweetmist

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

    Novastr to all!

    We r moving camp to fear street! Ps to scarletpaw. Ur kit is dying at 12th reault

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Icepaw

    ATTACK IN RESULT 1

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    Shadowscar

    Comforts her" its ok. Its ok.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Amenesia

    Amenesia walks to camp.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

    Scarletclaw

    How many places are you locked out of Scarpaw.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    Shadowscar

    What the heck?!?!?

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2012

    Shadowstar-nursey

    In a small cave with a cool, sandy floor is the nursey. The entrance is covered with brambles to protect it from scorching sunlight, freezing snow and rain, and chilly breezes. This is were the furture warriors of Fearclan sleep, along with their mothers.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)