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The Feathery
     

The Feathery

4.0 2
by Bill Flynn
 
The Feathery plot centers around a unique type of golf ball used during a record match at St. Andrews, Scotland in 1849. The story is set in San Diego, London and New York, as well as in ancient and modern Scotland. The game of golf blends with mystery and suspense surrounding an obsession so strong by some to own this valuable antique feathery golf ball that they'll

Overview

The Feathery plot centers around a unique type of golf ball used during a record match at St. Andrews, Scotland in 1849. The story is set in San Diego, London and New York, as well as in ancient and modern Scotland. The game of golf blends with mystery and suspense surrounding an obsession so strong by some to own this valuable antique feathery golf ball that they'll commit murder to satisfy it. A sub-plot involves an attempt by a gambling interest to fix the British Open when the leading player's caddie is abducted to force his withdrawal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781419675713
Publisher:
BookSurge, LLC
Publication date:
11/02/2007
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
908,376
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.57(d)

Meet the Author

Bill Flynn is a retired aerospace engineerwho lives in New Hampshire with his wife Barbara.His follow-on career was devoted to golf product exporting. Both careers took him to the places his book, The Feathery, is set. He has been fortunate to have played imperfect golf on many of the perfect golf courses of this planet. Bill's first novel, A Deadly Class Reunion is available on Amazon. His work in process is about the adventures of three boys set on Cape Cod in 1942 while German submarines lurk off shore. One sub launches two spies and the teenagers stumble in on their covert mission. The back story describes the life and love of a German U-Boat commander who is not as enthralled by the Nazi regime as some in his crew are.

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Feathery 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
NYM More than 1 year ago
Very entertaining golf murder thriller interwoven with some golf history. Kept me up late a few nights as I was just going to read "one more page."
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
THE FEATHERY is a sprawling adventure that sweeps over historical fiction, lingers over mystery, and flirts with romance as it spans a timeline of more than 150 years. Though the narration briefly touches down in 1849 and 2004, the bulk of the action begins in 2009, when Scott Beckman, an up-and-coming golfer, inherits an antique golf ball from his deceased mentor, Sandy McNair. When Scott gets the golf ball appraised, he discovers that not only is it a rare type of golf ball known as a feathery, but also that this particular feathery was used by golf legend Hugh McNair to set a course record at the St. Andrews course in 1849.

Though Scott is talented, a string of bad luck on the courses forces him to consider auctioning the feathery, and when he puts it up for auction, the bidding quickly rises to well over $1,000,000. However, shortly thereafter, his tour earnings rise enough that he decides to withdraw the feathery from auction. This move sparks violence from those so obsessed with this priceless feathery that they will rob and murder to get it. Scott survives this conflict, only to find more danger on the golf course when he enters the British Open as a long shot - and, much to the chagrin of those in control of the betting odds, appears to be in contention for the trophy.

The premise of THE FEATHERY is original and interesting; I was surprised to find myself completely caught up in the history of golf shared in this book, as I am not generally very interested in golf. Unfortunately, delivery in this novel is somewhat lacking. The prose is sometimes choppy, the dialogue unrealistic, and the wrenchingly emotional conflicts of the main characters are not given the time and depth that they deserve. For all its faults, though, THE FEATHERY remains engaging because of its unique subject and treatment. It is obvious that the author knows his subject, and his enthusiasm spreads easily to the reader.