Federal government in Canada by John George Bourinot | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Federal government in Canada

Federal government in Canada

by John George Bourinot
     
 
The book may have numerous typos or missing text. It is not illustrated or indexed. However, purchasers can download a free copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website. You can also preview the book there.
Purchasers are also entitled to a trial membership in the publisher's book club where they can select from more than a million books for

Overview

The book may have numerous typos or missing text. It is not illustrated or indexed. However, purchasers can download a free copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website. You can also preview the book there.
Purchasers are also entitled to a trial membership in the publisher's book club where they can select from more than a million books for free.

Publisher: N. Murray, publication agent, Johns Hopkins university Publication date: 1889
Subjects: Constitutional history; Canada; Federal government; History / Canada / General; Law / Constitutional; Political Science / General; Political Science / Political Process / General; Political Science / Constitutions; Political Science / Government / National

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940018827306
Publisher:
Baltimore, Murray
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
377 KB

Read an Excerpt


LECTURE II. GENERAL FEATURES OF THE FEDERAL SYSTEM. The Dominion1 of Canada now consists of seven provinces regularly organized and of an immense area of undeveloped and sparsely settled territory extending from Ontario to the base of the Rocky Mountains, and temporarily divided into four large districts, for the purposes of government. The area of the whole Dominion is only thirty thousand English square miles less than that of the United States,2 including the vast 1 " The history of the circumstances under which the name of the ' Dominion ' came to be given to the united provinces shows the desire of the Canadians to give to the confederation, at the very outset, a monarchical likeness in contradistinction to the republican character of the American federal union. We have it on the best authority that in 1866-67 the question arose during a conference between the Canadian delegates and the Imperial authorities what name should be given to the confederation of the provinces, and it was first proposed that it should be called 'The Kingdom of Canada;' but it is said that the Earl of Carnarvon, then secretary of state for the colonies, thought such a designation inadvisable, chiefly on the ground that it would be probably objectionable to the government of the United States, which had so recently expressed its disapprobation of the attempt of the Emperor Napoleon to establish an imperial European dynasty in Mexico The Canadian delegates made due allowance for the delicacy of the sentiments of the minister and agreed, as a compromise, to the less ambitious title, Dominion of Canada,—a designation recalling that 'Old Dominion,' named by Raleigh in honor of the virgin Queen." Seearticle by author in the Scottish Review for April, 1885. 3 The United States has an area of 3...

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