Federalism DIY: 10 Ways for States to Check and Balance Washington [NOOK Book]

Overview

The federal government is tightening its control over the 50 states and the lives of every American. The U.S. Constitution, however, says states are supposed to be equal partners with the federal government. State sovereignty—allowing each state to control its own affairs—is the cornerstone of that equal partnership and critical to protecting Americans' freedom. The Federalism DIY shows 10 ways local policymakers and citizens can restore that balance of power and do what's best ...
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Federalism DIY: 10 Ways for States to Check and Balance Washington

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Overview

The federal government is tightening its control over the 50 states and the lives of every American. The U.S. Constitution, however, says states are supposed to be equal partners with the federal government. State sovereignty—allowing each state to control its own affairs—is the cornerstone of that equal partnership and critical to protecting Americans' freedom. The Federalism DIY shows 10 ways local policymakers and citizens can restore that balance of power and do what's best for the people of your state.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012843975
  • Publisher: Goldwater Institute
  • Publication date: 6/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 103
  • File size: 718 KB

Meet the Author

Nick Dranias holds the Clarence J. and Katherine P. Duncan Chair for Constitutional Government and is Director of the Joseph and Dorothy Donnelly Moller Center for Constitutional Government at the Goldwater Institute.

Prior to joining the Goldwater Institute, Dranias was an attorney with the Institute for Justice. In law school, Dranias served on the Loyola University Chicago Law Review, competed on Loyola’s National Labor Law Moot Court Team, and received various academic awards. He graduated cum laude from Boston University with a B.A. in Economics and Philosophy.

Dranias led the Goldwater Institute’s challenge to Arizona’s so-called clean elections law all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Using the centuries-old federal All Writs Act, he persuaded the Supreme Court to block the issuance of equalizing funds to government-funded “clean” candidates even before the Court accepted the case for review. He has also authored numerous scholarly articles in law reviews and bar journals, including the Penn State Law Review article, Past the Pall of Orthodoxy, which challenges bar admission restrictions limiting the practice of law to graduates of ABA-accredited law schools, the Texas Review of Law and Politics article, Consideration as Contract, which makes the case for a natural law of contracts, and the Phoenix Law Review article, The Local Liberty Charter: Restoring Grassroots Liberty to Restrain Cities Gone Wild, which argues that applying principles of limited government to cities, counties and towns is not only the right thing to do, but a practical necessity. He has also authored numerous public policy reports, including The Land Of 10,000 Lakes Drowns Entrepreneurs In Regulations, a study that shows how regulations block the path to the American Dream, and how those barriers can be removed, 50 Bright Stars: An Assessment of Each State’s Constitutional Commitment to Limited Government, which reveals that 48 out of 50 states offer a stronger guarantee of limited government under their state constitutions than does the federal government under the U.S. Constitution, and Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission: A Case for Limiting Campaign Finance Regulations, which defends the Supreme Court's decision to protect campaign spending by corporations and other associations of individuals as essential to protecting free speech. Dranias’ latest work is Federalism DIY: 10 Ways for States to
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