The Federalist: The Essential Essays, by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay / Edition 1

The Federalist: The Essential Essays, by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay / Edition 1

by Jack Rakove, James Madison, John Jay
     
 

ISBN-10: 031224732X

ISBN-13: 9780312247324

Pub. Date: 02/03/2003

Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's

Considered the United States’ greatest contribution to the “canon” of western political theory, The Federalist is a series of 85 essays first published between the early fall of 1787 and the spring of 1788 supporting the ratification of the Constitution. In a new edition of this work, Jack Rakove presents the most critical and frequently

Overview

Considered the United States’ greatest contribution to the “canon” of western political theory, The Federalist is a series of 85 essays first published between the early fall of 1787 and the spring of 1788 supporting the ratification of the Constitution. In a new edition of this work, Jack Rakove presents the most critical and frequently assigned Federalist essays with an introduction to current scholarly thinking about the Constitution and the role these essays played in its adoption. Headnotes for each essay help identify the specific arguments being made in response to Anti-Federalist concerns, making the collection’s import more readily apparent to students. Related writings by Hamilton and Madison help set the Federalist in historical context.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312247324
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
02/03/2003
Series:
Bedford Cultural Editions Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword

Preface

PART ONE

Introduction: The Federalist in Context

The Road to Philadelphia

The Authors

The Federal Convention

The Anti-Federalist Critique of the Constitution The Federalist Response and the Response of The Federalist

Reading The Federalist

PART TWO

The Documents: The Federalist

1. Introduction, October 27, 1787 [Hamilton]

6. Concerning Dangers from War between the States, November 14, 1787 [Hamilton]

9. The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection, November 21, 1787 [Hamilton]

10. The Same Subject Continued, November 22, 1787 [Madison]

14. An Objection Drawn from the Extent of Country Answered, November 30, 1787 [Madison]

15. Concerning the Defects of the Present Confederation in Relation to the Principle of Legislation for the States in Their Collective Capacities, December 1, 1787 [Hamilton]

23. The Necessity of a Government at Least Equally Energetic with the One Proposed, December 18, 1787 [Hamilton]

32. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning Taxation), January 2, 1788 [Hamilton]

33. The Same Subject Continued, January 2, 1788 [Hamilton]

35. The Same Subject Continued, January 5, 1788 [Hamilton]

37. Concerning the Difficulties Which the Convention Must Have Experienced in the Formation of a Proper Plan, January 11, 1788 [Madison]

39. The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles: An Objection in Respect to the Powers of the Convention Examined, January 16, 1788 [Madison]

45. A Further Discussion of the Supposed Danger from the Powers of the Union to the State Governments, January 26, 1788 [Madison]

46. The Subject of the Last Paper Resumed with an Examination of the Comparative Means of Influence of the Federal and State Governments, January 29, 1788 [Madison]

47. The Meaning of the Maxim, Which Requires a Separation of the Departments of Power, Examined and Ascertained, January 30, 1788 [Madison]

48. The Same Subject Continued with a View to the Means of Giving Efficacy in Practice to That Maxim, February 1, 1788 [Madison]

49. The Same Subject Continued with the Same View, February 2, 1788 [Madison]

50. The Same Subject Continued with the Same View, February 5, 1788 [Madison]

51. The Same Subject Continued with the Same View and Concluded, February 6, 1788 [Madison]

53. The Same Subject Continued (Concerning the House of Representatives) with a View of the Term of the Service of the Members, February 9, 1788 [Madison]

54. The Same Subject Continued with a View to the Ratio of Representation, February 12, 1788 [Madison]

62. Concerning the Constitution of the Senate with Regard to the Qualifications of the Members, the Manner of Appointing Them, the Equality of Representation, the Number of the Senators and the Duration of Their Appointments, February 27, 1788 [Madison]

63. A Further View of the Constitution of the Senate in Regard to the Duration of Appointment of Its Members, March 1, 1788 [Madison]

64. A Further View of the Constitution of the Senate in Regard to the Power of Making Treaties, March 5, 1788 [Jay]

70. The Same View Continued (Concerning the Constitution of the President) in Relation to the Unity of the Executive, with an Examination of the Project of an Executive Council, March 15, 1788 [Hamilton]

71. The Same View Continued in Regard to the Duration of the Office, March 18, 1788 [Hamilton]

72. The Same View Continued in Regard to the Re-eligibility of the President, March 19, 1788 [Hamilton]

75. The Same View Continued in Relation to the Power of Making Treaties, March 26, 1788 [Hamilton]

78. A View of the Constitution of the Judicial Department in Relation to the Tenure of Good Behavior, May 28, 1788 [Hamilton]

81. A Further View of the Judicial Department in Relation to the Distribution of Its Authority, May 28, 1788 [Hamilton]

84. Concerning Several Miscellaneous Objections, May 28, 1788 [Hamilton]

85. Conclusion, May 28, 1788 [Hamilton]

APPENDIXES

A Constitutional Chronology (1786–1791)

Questions for Consideration

Selected Bibliography

Index

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >