Feedback: Television against Democracy / Edition 1

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Overview

"American television embodies a paradox: it is a privately owned and operated public communications network that most citizens are unable to participate in except as passive spectators. Television creates an image of community while preventing the formation of actual social ties because behind its simulated exchange of opinions lies a highly centralized corporate structure that is profoundly antidemocratic. In Feedback, David Joselit describes the privatized public sphere of television and recounts the tactics developed by artists and media activists in the 1960s and 1970s to break open its closed circuit." In Feedback, Joselit analyzes midcentury image-events using the procedures and categories of art history. The trope of figure/ground reversal, for instance, is used to assess acts of representation in a variety of media - including the medium of politics. In a televisual world, Joselit argues, where democracy is conducted though images, art history has the capacity to become a political science.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An elegant, passionately argued, and crucially important rallying cry.... There may be hope that this call to arms for the fields of art history and criticism will not go unheeded."Ulrich Baer Modern Painters

"[Joselit's] wonderfully spare text focuses on the first hints of the digital future as it was mapped by commercial network executives on the clunky hardware of the cathode-ray tube and the dumb black boxes that decoded the increasingly privatized information stream of cable TV."Caroline A. Jones Artforum

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262101202
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 4/30/2007
  • Series: October Books Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 232
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

David Joselit is Distinguished Professor in the Art History Department of the CUNY GraduateCenter and the author of Infinite Regress: Marcel Duchamp 1910-1941 (MIT Press,1998) and American Art Since 1945.

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Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     ix
Introduction: Television against Democracy     xi
Open Circuits     1
Virus     43
Feedback     85
Avatar     133
Afterword: Manifesto     171
Notes     173
Index     203
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