Feeding the Beast: The White House Versus the Press

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Avoiding single-minded laments on the shortcomings of the presidency or the failings of the press, Feeding the Beast is an evenhanded though often damning critique of the relationship between the White House and the news media, a relationship that can create more problems than it solves. For an informed electorate and an enlightened citizenry, few institution are more important than the presidency and the mainstream media, and here Kenneth T. Walsh, a senior White House correspondent for U.S. News & World ...
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Overview

Avoiding single-minded laments on the shortcomings of the presidency or the failings of the press, Feeding the Beast is an evenhanded though often damning critique of the relationship between the White House and the news media, a relationship that can create more problems than it solves. For an informed electorate and an enlightened citizenry, few institution are more important than the presidency and the mainstream media, and here Kenneth T. Walsh, a senior White House correspondent for U.S. News & World Report, candidly reports how ordinary citizens are the biggest losers in the current state of affairs. The widespread practice of "spin doctoring," the willingness on the part of the White House to mislead the press, overly interpretive reporting, and "gotcha" journalism do more to distort reality than illuminate it. Starting with George Washington, Walsh shows how Presidents and presidential candidates have repeated the same mistakes in dealing with the press from the beginning of the Republic. As the national media have grown over time into a voracious beast demanding to be fed, they have lost sight of their fundamental mission of presenting the world in a straightforward and comprehensive way to viewers, listeners, and readers. Too often, Walsh asserts, the press suffers from four basic flaws: injecting too much attitude into stories, assuming an overly negative approach to all news, rushing to judgment, and ignoring the values of Middle America. Walsh is able not only to point out the chronic problems, but also to examine how this crucial nexus for an involved electorate has become so contaminated that ordinary citizens no longer trust either the media or their elected officials.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Despite the title and the book's gloss of press criticism, this is mostly a competent, conventional memoir of the past decade on the White House beat. U.S. News & World Report White House correspondent Walsh declares that the White House and the news media no longer trust each other, thus shortchanging the American public. He cites both manipulative politicos and the rise of journalists' cynicism and television's focus on personality. His anecdotal history of the Reagan, Bush and Clinton years is readable but strains for judgment: Did the run-up to the Gulf War really show the media on two sides, jingoists and antimilitarists? Was the press really unfair to Dan Quayle? Walsh's observations that the White House media focus too much on conflict, are tyrannized by the fast-running news cycle and are isolated from middle America have been made more eloquently in James Fallows's recent Breaking the News. Walsh's prescription, that reporters avoid editorializing or analysis, and that they get outside the Beltway, are only partial solutions. (May)
Library Journal
That serious conflict exists between government and news media is not a new idea; it has generated numeous books, scholarly studies, essays, and editorials in recent years. What distinguishes this volume by the White House correspondent for U.S. News and World Report is its thoroughness, its evenhandedness, and the author's willingness to chastise his colleagues: "If we do not mend our ways, within a decade there will be a rollback of our protections. Libel laws could be weakened ...access to information could be tightened to limit reporters' ability to ... investigate abuses in government." There's plenty of blame as well for a government that has lied to the public or has been incompetent in handling its press relations. Recommended especially for libraries with major contemporary political collections.-Chet Hagan, Berks Cty. P.L. Sys., Pa.
Kirkus Reviews
A veteran White House correspondent gives mixed reviews to his colleagues and the powerful people on his beat.

There are several problems with Walsh's chronicle of his ten years covering the presidency for U.S. News and World Report. Walsh remains on the beat and has been careful not to burn all his bridges. The result is a curious mix of unqualified criticism of people with whom he no longer has to deal (such as former Bush chief of staff John Sununu, whom Walsh accuses of "arrogance and condescension"), and excuses for the mistakes of sources still to be tapped (such as Hillary Clinton, blamed for much of the administration's mishandling of the press but forgiven as an "increasingly poignant figure"). Another problem is the danger of swift obsolescence in books attempting to be entirely up-to-the- minute. The danger for Walsh is compounded because nearly half of the book is devoted to the still-evolving Clinton presidency. And Walsh rationalizes the behavior of his press colleagues even as he concedes that "the media's cult of conflict and criticism has gone too far." But there is also much to recommend this book. Walsh is a good reporter who has the quotes and citations to support his thesis that presidents who feed the White House press corps (the "beast") will be rewarded in kind. He attributes Reagan's long honeymoon with the press to the nurturing given journalists by a savvy staff. Clinton, on the other hand, has been punished for surrounding himself with people who distrusted White House reporters and treated them shabbily. Walsh describes the immense role personalities play in shaping the portrait of the presidency presented to the American people, and many observers of the press will find his revelations interesting.

But one suspects that this book will become required reading only at the White House, where it will prove useful as a manual for staffers on the care and feeding of the media beast.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401050580
  • Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
  • Publication date: 5/28/2002
  • Pages: 407
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
1 White House Horrors 3
2 The Way It Was 14
3 World Crisis and Presidential Dominance 28
4 Secrets of the Great Communicator 39
5 The 1988 Campaign 60
6 The Bush Years 76
7 Dan Quayle 100
8 The 1992 Campaign 113
9 Battle Stations 127
10 Hillary 157
11 A Failed Charm Offensive 176
12 Midterm: Disaster 184
13 The Arrival of Mike McCurry, and the Newt Factor 197
14 State of the Union 210
15 Upswing 219
16 In Search of a Message 226
17 The Media in Transition 236
18 Downgrading the White House Beat 245
19 At the Core of the Press Corps 257
20 What's Wrong with the Press 280
21 Backlash 298
Notes 307
Index 321
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