Felicity Learns a Lesson: A School Story (American Girls Collection Series: Felicity #2)

Felicity Learns a Lesson: A School Story (American Girls Collection Series: Felicity #2)

4.6 14
by Valerie Tripp, Dan Andreasen, LuAnn Roberts, Keith Skeen
     
 

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Felicity is sent to Miss Manderly's house to learn to be a proper gentlewoman. There she learns an important lesson about loyalty.

Overview

Felicity is sent to Miss Manderly's house to learn to be a proper gentlewoman. There she learns an important lesson about loyalty.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781562470067
Publisher:
American Girl Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/01/1991
Series:
American Girl Collection Series: Felicity , #2
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
80
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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Felicity Learns a Lesson: A School Story (American Girls Collection Series: Felicity #2) 4.6 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the way Flicity acts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My favorite character in this book was Felicity, because in the story Felicity and her friend, Elizabeth are funny in some parts. I liked the part of the book when Felicity and Elizabeth call Elizabeth¿s older sister Annabelle Bananabelle.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is awesome! I am a big historical fiction reader, and I love school, so this book is perfact for me. I recomend this book to absolutly everyone, even if you don't like school or historical fiction. After you read it, you will love it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like all of the action the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book just not in AR
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very childishly written but quirky and fun
Les_Livres More than 1 year ago
"... This update is over the first six books about Felicity Merriman, a spunky young redhead in colonial America, in the dawn of the Revolutionary War. All six books were written by Valerie Tripp. Felicity lives in Virginia with her mother, father, and her little brother and sister. Her father is a shopkeeper, and his young apprentice lives with them as well - he is older than Felicity, but they become good friends. Felicity also befriends a girl her age whose family of Loyalists comes over from England. Felicity's family are Patriots, and this difference does cause some tension between the girls at one point. ..." For full review, please visit me (Les Livres) on Blogger!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
ISBN 0590459872 ¿ I¿ve put off reading any American Girls books because I¿ve really disliked the entire AG phenomenon, with extraordinarily overpriced dolls and all the extras. Having finally read a pair of them, I consider myself ashamed of myself for judging a book by the product it promotes. Felicity is a young tomboy-ish girl in 1774, when her mother decides that it¿s time for her to start learning the things she will need to know as an adult ¿ and those things don¿t include the education Felicity is interested in. She begins to take lessons from Miss Manderly, along with sisters Elizabeth and Annabelle Cole. Elizabeth and Felicity become friends, but Annabelle is a snobby Loyalist and when Felicity¿s father shows himself to be a Patriot, Felicity finds she has to decide for herself what she believes in. When an unmarried woman, an old maid in her time, is the person who teaches young girls what they¿ll need to know in order to be good wives, the world is off-track, I think. I found it mildly offensive that the reader is supposed to believe that Felicity just accepted the role she obviously didn¿t look forward to. Even if that¿s an accurate reflection of the time, the author could have done better. The information casually sprinkled throughout is nice (¿a pomade of hog¿s fat and cinnamon¿ ought to get them asking questions!). The educational materials at the back of the book are a fantastic addition to a pretty good book and the illustrations are awesome, with a resemblance to the illustrations in older editions of Little Women, a rare occurrence in books for older children. But I still don¿t like the dolls, et al. - AnnaLovesBooks
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! I could'nt imagine losing my tooth in my teacup.Felicity brings this story to life with her playful actions!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never heard of it if you read this tell me at TAP HERE REPLY Only at this book reviws
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You spelt felicity wrong. Learn how to spell,dummy! HA HA!