Overview

The complete American presidential inaugural addresses featuring historical background by a National Book Award winner

A testament to the power of oratory, this stirring and often surprising collection includes all fifty-five United States presidential inaugural addresses, as well as a general introduction...
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Fellow Citizens: The Penguin Book of U.S. Presidential Inaugural Addresses

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Overview

The complete American presidential inaugural addresses featuring historical background by a National Book Award winner

A testament to the power of oratory, this stirring and often surprising collection includes all fifty-five United States presidential inaugural addresses, as well as a general introduction and commentary that provides historical context for each speech. Marking pivotal moments in American history, readers will learn:

? How George Washington came to ad-lib ?So help me, God? at the end of his first inaugural address

? Why Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address is considered one of the finest ever delivered

? The historical background behind Franklin D. Roosevelt's ?The only thing we have to fear is fear itself? and John F.

Kennedy's ?Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.?


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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Especially timely in this presidential election season, this book contains all 55 presidential inaugural addresses, word for word, from George Washington in 1789 through George W. Bush in 2005. Editors Remini (historian, U.S. House of Representatives; Andrew Jackson), and Golway (curator, John Kean Center for American History, Kean Univ.; Washington's General) provide excellent, readable historical context and pertinent facts prior to each address, as well as in an introduction. The supplied context and commentary make the book shine, for example, that Grover Cleveland, for his first address in 1885, recited the entire speech from memory, or that it was the custom, begun by Jefferson, for presidents to step down after two terms, until FDR ran for a third term in 1940 (with the 22nd Amendment preventing it thereafter). A pleasure to read, even for those who don't think they're history buffs; recommended for public and college libraries.
—Leigh Mihlrad

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440631573
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 8/26/2008
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 1,329,598
  • File size: 686 KB

Meet the Author

Robert V. Remini, whose three-volume biography, Andrew Jackson, won the National Book Award and was reissued in 1998 as a Main Selection of the History Book Club, is also the author of biographies of Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. He is professor emeritus of history and research professor emeritus of humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and lives in Wilmette, Illinois.

Robert V. Remini, whose three-volume biography, Andrew Jackson, won the National Book Award and was reissued in 1998 as a Main Selection of the History Book Club, is also the author of biographies of Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. He is professor emeritus of history and research professor emeritus of humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and lives in Wilmette, Illinois.

Robert V. Remini, whose three-volume biography, Andrew Jackson, won the National Book Award and was reissued in 1998 as a Main Selection of the History Book Club, is also the author of biographies of Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. He is professor emeritus of history and research professor emeritus of humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and lives in Wilmette, Illinois.
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Table of Contents


Introduction   Robert V. Remini   Terry Golway     ix
First Inaugural Address (April 30, 1789)   George Washington     1
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1793)   George Washington     8
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1797)   John Adams     10
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1801)   Thomas Jefferson     19
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1805)   Thomas Jefferson     27
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1809)   James Madison     35
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1813)   James Madison     41
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1817)   James Monroe     47
Second Inaugural Address (March 5, 1821)   James Monroe     58
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1825)   John Quincy Adams     71
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1829)   Andrew Jackson     81
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1833)   Andrew Jackson     87
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1837)   Martin Van Buren     93
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1841)   William Henry Harrison     104
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1845)   James K. Polk     124
InauguralAddress (March 5, 1849)   Zachary Taylor     138
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1853)   Franklin Pierce     144
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1857)   James Buchanan     154
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1861)   Abraham Lincoln     164
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1865)   Abraham Lincoln     176
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1869)   Ulysses S. Grant     181
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1873)   Ulysses S. Grant     187
Inaugural Address (March 5, 1877)   Rutherford B. Hayes     193
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1881)   James A. Garfield     202
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1885)   Grover Cleveland     212
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1889)   Benjamin Harrison     219
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1893)   Grover Cleveland     232
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1897)   William McKinley     240
Second Inaugural Address (March 4, 1901)   William McKinley     252
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1905)   Theodore Roosevelt     260
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1909)   William Howard Taft     266
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1913)   Woodrow Wilson     281
Second Inaugural Address (March 5, 1917)   Woodrow Wilson     288
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1921)   Warren G. Harding     295
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1925)   Calvin Coolidge     306
Inaugural Address (March 4, 1929)   Herbert Hoover     318
First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1933)   Franklin D. Roosevelt     331
Second Inaugural Address (January 20, 1937)   Franklin D. Roosevelt     339
Third Inaugural Address (January 20, 1941)   Franklin D. Roosevelt     347
Fourth Inaugural Address (January 20, 1945)   Franklin D. Roosevelt     354
Inaugural Address (January 20, 1949)   Harry S. Truman     358
First Inaugural Address (January 20, 1953)   Dwight D. Eisenhower     367
Second Inaugural Address (January 21, 1957)   Dwight D. Eisenhower     376
Inaugural Address (January 20, 1961)   John F. Kennedy     383
Inaugural Address (January 20, 1965)   Lyndon B. Johnson     389
First Inaugural Address (January 20, 1969)   Richard Nixon     396
Second Inaugural Address (January 20, 1973)   Richard Nixon      405
Succession Speech (August 9, 1974)   Gerald R. Ford     413
Inaugural Address (January 20, 1977)   Jimmy Carter     417
First Inaugural Address (January 20, 1981)   Ronald Reagan     423
Second Inaugural Address (January 21, 1985)   Ronald Reagan     432
Inaugural Address (January 20, 1989)   George H. W. Bush     441
First Inaugural Address (January 20, 1993)   Bill Clinton     449
Second Inaugural Address (January 20, 1997)   Bill Clinton     456
First Inaugural Address (January 20, 2001)   George W. Bush     464
Second Inaugural Address (January 20, 2005)   George W. Bush     470
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  • Posted August 9, 2011

    55 inagural adresses

    There have not been 55 presidents as of 2011

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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