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Feminine Look: Sexuation, Spectatorship, Subversion [NOOK Book]

Overview

Feminine Look shows how the Lacanian concept of sexuation makes possible a new account of the relationship among feminism, psychoanalysis, and spectatorship. Whereas previous studies have tended to ask how spectatorship may be influenced by sexual difference, Jennifer Friedlander asks how particular spectatorial encounters may engender different "sexuated" responses. In so doing, she traces a fresh path through Freud's account of the relationship between visual perception and sexual difference and rereads Freud's...
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Feminine Look: Sexuation, Spectatorship, Subversion

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Overview

Feminine Look shows how the Lacanian concept of sexuation makes possible a new account of the relationship among feminism, psychoanalysis, and spectatorship. Whereas previous studies have tended to ask how spectatorship may be influenced by sexual difference, Jennifer Friedlander asks how particular spectatorial encounters may engender different "sexuated" responses. In so doing, she traces a fresh path through Freud's account of the relationship between visual perception and sexual difference and rereads Freud's fable of castration anxiety, suggesting that sexual identity arises as a response to the symbolic order's indifference to the subject's need for a solid identity. She examines provocative and controversial artistic images by Jamie Wagg, Marcus Harvey, and Sally Mann to demonstrate how images not only create and embody social practices but also precipitate viewer anxieties and pleasures.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Feminine Look continuously retells and (re)explores several theories as Friedlander employs them to contrast the inscribed and approved methods of late twentieth-century scholarly work on sexuation and spectatorship, and as she explores her conceptualization and subversion of these theories she suggests a new politics of the image as well as a new theoretical approach. Her examples, spectacular images, smooth argument, and well-based theoretical background make her second book a novel contribution to film, visual, and cultural studies alike.— Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies

"Blending very sophisticated psychoanalytic theory with some novel and yet important visual-media texts, Friedlander makes a strong contribution to the field of feminist visual-media theory and female spectatorship by returning to its origins in Lacanian studies. By reinvestigating the role Lacan played in those studies-vis-á-vis Freud, Saussure, and Barthes-she creates a playful new space for contemplating the gendered look. She also offers a theoretical account of how contemporary photography and other technological 'gaze' media represent gendered images through unconscious and linguistic devices."— Laura Hinton, author of The Perverse Gaze of Sympathy: Sadomasochistic Sentiments from Clarissa to Rescue 911"
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780791479056
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press
  • Publication date: 9/18/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jennifer Friedlander is Edgar E. and Elizabeth S. Pankey Professor of Media Studies and Assistant Professor of Art History at Pomona College.

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations     vii
Acknowledgments     ix
Introduction     1
Overlooking the Real in Camera Lucida     11
The Accident That Will Have Happened: Barthes, Kertesz, and the Punctum     17
Film Theory, Sexual In-Difference, and Lacan's Tale of Two Toilets     31
How Should a Woman Look? Scopic Strategies for Sexuated Subjects     49
Opening Up to the Punctum in Jamie Wagg's History Painting: Shopping Mall     69
Myra, Myra On the Wall, Who's the Scariest of Them All? Sensation and the Studium     77
Framing the Child in Sally Mann's Photographs     93
Conclusion: Film Theory for Post-theory     111
Notes     117
Bibliography     127
Index     137
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