Feminine Spirit: Recapturing the Heart of Scripture

Feminine Spirit: Recapturing the Heart of Scripture

by Lynne Bundesen
     
 

Using a variety of analytical and descriptive tools, this nondenominational, innovative, and solid approach to the Bible goes deeply into biblical text to uncover new insights about who God is. It provides a fresh and insightful way for women to read the Bible outside the patriarchal framework that has predominated, going beyond stereotypes and male-centered

Overview

Using a variety of analytical and descriptive tools, this nondenominational, innovative, and solid approach to the Bible goes deeply into biblical text to uncover new insights about who God is. It provides a fresh and insightful way for women to read the Bible outside the patriarchal framework that has predominated, going beyond stereotypes and male-centered traditional teachings to illuminate how women can better relate both to the Bible and to God.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The traditional narrative of the male-dominated Bible is turned on its head in this new understanding offered by Bundesen, a former syndicated columnist and author of So the Woman Went Her Way. She goes back to the original Hebrew for a feminine interpretation of "ruach Elohim" (the Spirit of God), also referring to the King James Version of the Bible as the translation that "has led to confusion about the nature of the biblical God." Her understanding of God as "the Breasted One" opens the door to different interpretations of the roles of biblical women. "What in the present culture leads us to think biblical women are veiled, isolated, non-entities in a desert landscape, trailing behind husbands who are worshipping a vengeful male God?" she asks. The stories of Sarah, Rebekah, Abigail, Ruth, Esther, Mary and others are seen in a new light, as are Old Testament teachings and New Testament writers such as Paul. This is not a new translation or commentary, nor is it a breezy read for women looking for light fare. Bundesen's knowledge of the Bible is clear throughout, as is her agenda: to offer a new way to read the Bible with women in the limelight. (Mar. 16) (Publishers Weekly, November 27, 2006)
Publishers Weekly
The traditional narrative of the male-dominated Bible is turned on its head in this new understanding offered by Bundesen, a former syndicated columnist and author of So the Woman Went Her Way. She goes back to the original Hebrew for a feminine interpretation of "ruach Elohim" (the Spirit of God), also referring to the King James Version of the Bible as the translation that "has led to confusion about the nature of the biblical God." Her understanding of God as "the Breasted One" opens the door to different interpretations of the roles of biblical women. "What in the present culture leads us to think biblical women are veiled, isolated, non-entities in a desert landscape, trailing behind husbands who are worshipping a vengeful male God?" she asks. The stories of Sarah, Rebekah, Abigail, Ruth, Esther, Mary and others are seen in a new light, as are Old Testament teachings and New Testament writers such as Paul. This is not a new translation or commentary, nor is it a breezy read for women looking for light fare. Bundesen's knowledge of the Bible is clear throughout, as is her agenda: to offer a new way to read the Bible with women in the limelight. (Mar. 16) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal

Bundesen (So the Woman Went Her Way) claims her book "will help you read the Bible for yourself and help you discover the female aspect of God, the Creator, God the Mother that already exists in the Book." This is not a deep scholarly or historical analysis but a generalized, nearly book-by-book perspective heavy on elucidating "the female nature of God." Such an approach has already been taken in other fairly well-known works, some scholarly, some more popular-e.g., Mary Daly's controversial Beyond God the Father; Rosemary Radford Ruether's Sexism and God-Talk; Alice Ogden Bellis's Helpmates, Harlots, and Heroes: and Tikva Frymer-Kensky's Reading the Women of the Bible. But how well Bundesen accomplishes her aim is debatable. Only a quarter of the book is devoted to the New Testament, suggesting a limited female godly nature in the time of Jesus. And her section on Davidic women covers only Abigail, leaving aside the profound narratives of wives Michal and Bathsheba. Given these and other limitations, a marginal buy at best.
—Sandra Collins

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780787984953
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/30/2007
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.57(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"The traditional narrative of the male-dominated Bible is turned on its head in this new understanding offered by Bundesen. . . . The stories of Sarah, Rebekah, Abigail, Ruth, Esther, Mary, and others are seen in new light, as are Old Testament teachings and New Testament writers such as Paul. This is not a new translation or commentary, nor is it a breezy read for women looking for light fare. Bundesen’s knowledge of the Bible is clear throughout, as is her agenda: to offer a new way to read the Bible with women in the limelight."
Publisher’s Weekly

"As a pastor, theologian, father of four daughters, and one who is a chaplain with the USMC, I wish I had this book  in seminary twenty years ago. So many books are read once and put away. This one will cause the reader to return again and again."
—Rev. Patrick J. McLaughlin, commander, United States Navy Chaplain  Corps; former chaplain—Presidential Retreat Camp David

"Lynne Bundesen's latest work, The Feminine Spirit, ought to be required reading for anyone who is interested in a fuller understanding of the confluence of spirituality and gender."
—Rabbi Niles Elliot Goldstein, author, Gonzo Judaism: A Bold Path for Renewing an Ancient Faith

Meet the Author

Lynne Bundesen is the author of So the Woman Went Her Way, selected as one of the 25 Best Books of the past 25 years by the Washington National Book Club in 2003. A former faculty member at Boston Theological Institute and a Hearst Syndicate columnist, she is a three-time winner of the Religion in Media award.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >