Fen Country

( 4 )

Overview

Dandelions and hearing aids, a bloodstained cat, a Leonardo drawing, a corpse with an alibi, a truly poisonous letter...just some of the unusual clues that Oxford don/detective Gervase Fen and his friend Inspector Humbleby are confronted with in this sparkling collection of short mystery stories by one of the great masters of detective fiction.

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Fen Country

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Overview

Dandelions and hearing aids, a bloodstained cat, a Leonardo drawing, a corpse with an alibi, a truly poisonous letter...just some of the unusual clues that Oxford don/detective Gervase Fen and his friend Inspector Humbleby are confronted with in this sparkling collection of short mystery stories by one of the great masters of detective fiction.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781448207053
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 12/20/2012
  • Pages: 206
  • Sales rank: 1,247,420
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Edmund Crispin was the pseudonym of Robert Bruce Montgomery (usually credited as Bruce Montgomery) (2 October 1921 - 15 September 1978), an English crime writer and composer.

Montgomery wrote nine detective novels and two collections of short stories under the pseudonym Edmund Crispin (taken from a character in Michael Innes's Hamlet, Revenge!). The stories feature Oxford don Gervase Fen, who is a Professor of English at the university and a fellow of St Christopher's College, a fictional institution that Crispin locates next to St John's College. Fen is an eccentric, sometimes absent-minded, character reportedly based on the Oxford professor W. E. Moore. The whodunit novels have complex plots and fantastic, somewhat unbelievable solutions, including examples of the locked room mystery. They are written in a humorous, literary and sometimes farcical style and contain frequent references to English literature, poetry, and music. They are also among the few mystery novels to break the fourth wall occasionally and speak directly to the audience.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 21, 2014

    Great vintage book

    Edmund Crispin was a very witty and funny writer of mysteries that I read in the 1950's. I was very happy to find this as a nook book. Highly recommended!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2014

    intellectually different

    New (to me) hero, with unusual outlook

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    Boring

    You are stupid if you even read this book i fo sure didnt

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Classic english mystery stories

    But the novels are really the best oxford mysteries before Lewis on pbs these havent been on tv couldnt work in the animals of which seversl were the main characters and a pig most devoted they can be very very funny too especially the one about the power lines and trying to get someone to inspect the crackling

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