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The Fence: A Police Cover-Up along Boston's Racial Divide
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The Fence: A Police Cover-Up along Boston's Racial Divide

4.5 8
by Dick Lehr
 

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The Boston police officers who brutally beat Michael Cox at a deserted fence one icy night in 1995 knew soon after that they had made a terrible mistake. The badge and handgun under Cox's bloodied parka proved he was not a black gang member but a plainclothes cop chasing the same murder suspect his assailants were. Officer Kenny Conley, who pursued and apprehended

Overview

The Boston police officers who brutally beat Michael Cox at a deserted fence one icy night in 1995 knew soon after that they had made a terrible mistake. The badge and handgun under Cox's bloodied parka proved he was not a black gang member but a plainclothes cop chasing the same murder suspect his assailants were. Officer Kenny Conley, who pursued and apprehended the suspect while Cox was being beaten, was then wrongfully convicted by federal prosecutors of lying when he denied witnessing the attack on his brother officer. Both Cox and Conley were native Bostonians, each dedicating his life to service with the Boston Police Department. But when they needed its support, they were heartlessly and ruthlessly abandoned.

A remarkable work of investigative journalism, The Fence tells the shocking true story of the attack and its aftermath-and exposes the lies and injustice hidden behind a "blue wall of silence."

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Mired in the racial conflicts of a divided city, Lehr, coauthor of the bestselling Black Mass, details one of the most controversial cases in the annals of the Boston Police Department, involving a brutal assault on a black plainclothes officer by his fellow cops and the resulting 1998 civil rights trial against the police force. Not only does Lehr paint the racial and political turbulence of Boston at the time, but he explores the cultural backgrounds of the black officer, Michael Cox; his attacker and fellow officer, Kenny Conley; and Robert "Smut" Brown, a drug dealer involved in the killing that started it all. Cox, who responded to the murder and chased after the car carrying the suspects, was beaten very severely by his overzealous colleagues, waited for an administrative apology and got only a coverup by the department. What followed was a sensational trial with all of the key ingredients of police brutality and a "solid blue code of silence," with no winners. Jolting, nightmarish and potent, this true cop yarn bests any bogus reality show or overblown tabloid tale with its hard-boiled spin. 8 pages of b&w photos; 1 map. (July)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Library Journal

Far too often we hear about racial bias and undue violence on the part of a city's police department against the very citizens they are legally bound to protect. Here the Boston Police Department is taken to task. Lehr argues that the city of Boston itself has a well-established racial divide and that the police department reflects this partition. He tells the true story of an African American plainclothes police officer, Michael Cox, who was brutally beaten by his fellow officers in a case of mistaken identity. Subsequently, the beating was covered up by the police department, an example of the "Blue Law of Silence" wherein police officers remain silent about police matters that make the department look bad. Lehr provides an excellent review of the incident, the background of Officer Cox, the cover-up, and the ultimate trial. The result is an intriguing read that provides an admirable, in-depth description of police corruption.
—Tim Delaney

Kirkus Reviews
From former Boston Globe reporter Lehr (Journalism/Boston Univ.; co-author: Judgment Ridge: The Truth Story Behind the Dartmouth Murders, 2003, etc.), a somber tale of police corruption, racism and violent crime in Beantown. Think Serpico translated to Boston, where Mike Cox, a plainclothes police officer, and his partner were tracking criminals. One, the story's antihero, was a street thug known as "Smut," a 23-year-old with a lengthy police record. Their paths intersected with violent results at a hip-hop club on a January night in 1995. As Lehr notes, "plainclothes" isn't exactly right, for "it was unrealistic to think street-smart gang members would not spot them or their unmarked car." The gangbangers did better than certain of Cox's fellow officers in the Boston PD, who beat him senseless, apparently confusing him for a suspect. The cops, and others who arrived on the scene, concocted a tale: Cox "hit his head on the ice," they said, and they coached witnesses to say the same. None of the officers stepped up to tell the truth, erecting the well-known "blue wall of silence" that surrounds allegations of corruption and misconduct. Higher-ups in the BPD took a nonchalant approach to the case, "hoping the department's low-key response to the beating would result in a quick and quiet resolution that kept the matter largely in-house." To his great credit, Cox would not let it go. Having "realized long ago he could not depend on the police department for the truth," he embarked on a long legal odyssey for justice that resulted in victory-at least of a kind. A cautionary tale about the abuse of power and a timely civics lesson on the virtue of standing up to authority.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060780999
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/15/2010
Pages:
383
Sales rank:
717,223
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

As a reporter for nearly two decades for the Boston Globe, Dick Lehr won numerous journalism awards and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A professor of journalism at Boston University, he is coauthor of the Edgar Award-winning Black Mass, the Edgar Award finalist Judgment Ridge, and The Underboss. He lives near Boston with his wife and four children.

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Fence: A Police Cover-Up Along Boston's Racial Divide 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Such a good read... keeps you on the edge of your seat... Shows the ugly truth of a police cover-up .. must read
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Blushed and smiled. "Thanks."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago