Fiction 100: An Anthology of Short Fiction / Edition 11

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Overview

A collection of carefully chosen, interesting stories, the best-selling Fiction 100 ignites readers' curiosity, imagination, and intelligence. This outstanding selection of 131 stories is presented in an attractive format, and is available for an excellent price.

These selections represent a wide variety of subject matter, theme, literary technique, and style. International in scope, it contains fiction from the early 19th century to the present day, and features 131 traditional and contemporary works.

This collection is suitable for any reader who enjoys short works of fiction with literary merit.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131731349
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 2/1/2006
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 11
  • Pages: 1456
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 8.86 (h) x 1.52 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

With this ninth edition Fiction 100 passes yet another milestone. The eighth edition celebrated the fact that the book had been in print for 25 years, a full quarter of a century, a fact that surprised no one more than it did the editor. With the ninth edition comes yet another realization: Fiction 100 has now been available to college students and their teachers in four decades: the 1970s, the 1980s, the 1990s, and the first decade of the new millennium. With that realization comes still another: that while the world has changed a great deal since 1974, the aims and structure of Fiction 100 on the whole have not. Then as now I have tried to produce a large book of representative-quality short fiction that could be used in a wide variety of course formats and to do so at a reasonable price.

Another thing that has not changed is the difficulty I have faced in trying to cull the increasingly rich world of short fiction to decide what selections to make. One would think that with a table of contents as large as Fiction 100's such decisions would be relatively easy. They are not. As I long ago discovered, the problem of choice is only multiplied by size. The larger the book, the greater, in fact, the need for principles of selection.

Those that govern Fiction 100 are easily explained. First of all, I have insisted that the stories included must not only have literary merit but must be interesting. Four decades of teaching the short story to college students has persuaded me that any story, if it is to "work" in the classroom, must engage the curiosity, imagination, and intelligence ofstudents and provide them with a reading experience they find pleasurable. In addition, I have tried to assemble a collection of stories, international in scope, that represents a wide variety of subject matter, theme, literary technique, and style, and that, at the same time, serves to illustrate the development of short fiction—its continuity, durability, and tradition—from its identifiable beginnings in the early years of the nineteenth century to the present. To the extent possible, I have also asked that the stories "speak to one another" to make possible classroom discussion having to do with comparison and contrast. Roughly a third of the anthology is reserved for older, well-established stories—the so-called classics. They are offered without apology; good stories, no matter how often anthologized, are a source of endless pleasure and discovery that no amount of rereading, classroom discussion, or critical analysis can ever exhaust. On the other hand, Fiction 100 tries to present a broad selection of newer and contemporary stories to suggest the direction in which short fiction is moving as one century gives way to the next.

The book's editorial apparatus remains unchanged. It has been kept to a minimum to make Fiction 100 as usable in as many different kinds of fiction courses as possible. There are, of course, the study questions that follow each story. But these are, by intent, neither complete nor comprehensive. Rather, they are designed to be suggestive, to help guide students in their own literary response, and to serve as a springboard for classroom discussion. In much the same way, the Biographical Notes, Short Story Handbook, and Chronological Table of Contents are intended to provide students with additional resources, tools, and information without getting in the way of their instructor's course format and design.

The most significant change over the four decades has been the book's contents. Of the 100 stories in the 1974 edition, only 34 remain. While the majority of these represent older, nineteenth-century classics, nearly half belong to the twentieth century, suggesting that our definition of the "classic" short story is an ever-expanding one. The other 95 stories—for there are 129 stories in the ninth edition of Fiction 100—reflect my own changing relationship with the genre and my response to the many good suggestions from reviewers, colleagues, and students, including my own most recent students in English 2305 at the University of Houston. Many of those students, I hasten to add, have long since become reviewers, colleagues, and friends—another legacy of these past four decades, and one that I value deeply. All of you have my thanks.

Thanks too go to Carrie Brandon, my editor at Prentice Hall, who, among her other virtues, has one that every author and editor deeply appreciates. She is always there when you need her. I need to also thank the enterprising Fred Courtright, who served as permissions editor during this revision cycle, and whose knowledge and expertise in dealing with the always intricate and time-consuming issue of clearing rights and permissions are simply remarkable. Thanks also go to Joe Barron of P. M. Gordon Associates, Inc., who skillfully guided this ninth edition of Fiction 100 through the various stages of the production process.

If a period crossing four decades—the considerable portion of an adult life-time—provides anything in the way of perspective and wisdom, it is this: that editing Fiction 100 through nine editions has been an extraordinary opportunity for which I will always be grateful. Each new edition has been a genuine labor of love.

James H. Pickering

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Table of Contents

A

ALICE ADAMS

Roses, Rhododendron 1

SHERMAN ALEXIE

This Is What It Means to Say

Phoenix, Arizona 11

SHERWOOD ANDERSON

I Want to Know Why 20

MARY HUNTER AUSTIN

The Land 27

The Return of Mr. Wills 32

B

JAMES BALDWIN

Sonny’s Blues 37

TONI CADE BAMBARA

The Lesson 60

JULIAN BARNES

Trespass 66

ANDREA BARRETT

The Littoral Zone 74

JOHN BARTH

Lost in the Funhouse 81

DONALD BARTHELME

The Balloon 98

RICK BASS

The Hermit’s Story 102

ANN BEATTIE

Janus 112

SAUL BELLOW

Looking for Mr. Green 117

AMBROSE BIERCE

An Occurrence at Owl

Creek Bridge 132

AMY BLOOM

The Story 139

JORGE LUIS BORGES

The Garden of Forking

Paths 147

ELIZABETH BOWEN

The Demon Lover 155

KAY BOYLE

Astronomer’s Wife 160

T. CORAGHESSAN BOYLE

The Love of My Life 165

RAY BRADBURY

August 2002: Night Meeting 178

C

ALBERT CAMUS

The Guest 184

RAYMOND CARVER

Call If You Need Me 194

Cathedral 202

WILLA CATHER

Paul’s Case 213

JOHN CHEEVER

The Country Husband 228

ANTON CHEKHOV

The Darling 247

The Lady with the Dog 256

KATE CHOPIN

The Storm 268

The Story of an Hour 273

SANDRA CISNEROS

The House on Mango Street 276

SAMUEL L. CLEMENS

The Celebrated Jumping Frog

of Calaveras County 278

The Man That Corrupted

Hadleyburg 283

GRACE STONE COATES

Wild Plums 315

JOSEPH CONRAD

Heart of Darkness 319

The Secret Sharer 378

STEPHEN CRANE

The Blue Hotel 407

The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky 427

D

STEPHEN DOBYNS

Kansas 435

ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

A Scandal in Bohemia 440

FËDOR DOSTOEVSKI

The Grand Inquisitor 458

TOM DRURY

Chemistry 472

E

RALPH ELLISON

King of the Bingo Game 478

LOUISE ERDRICH

The Red Convertible 485

F

WILLIAM FAULKNER

Barn Burning 492

A Rose for Emily 505

F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

Winter Dreams 512

RICHARD FORD

Reunion 528

MARY WILKINS FREEMAN

A New England Nun 543

E. M. FORSTER

The Road from Colonus 534

G

GABRIEL GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ

A Very Old Man with

Enormous Wings 552

TIM GAUTREAUX

Same Places, Same Things 558

CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN

If I Were a Man 569

The Yellow Wall-Paper 574

SUSAN GLASPELL

A Jury of Her Peers 586

NICKOLAI GOGOL

The Overcoat 601

H

THOMAS HARDY

The Three Strangers 622

BRET HARTE

Tennessee’s Partner 639

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

My Kinsman, Major Molineux 646

Young Goodman Brown 660

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

Hills Like White Elephants 670

PAM HOUSTON

How to Talk to a Hunter 674

I

WASHINGTON IRVING

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 679

Rip Van Winkle 702

J

SHIRLEY JACKSON

The Lottery 713

HENRY JAMES

Four Meetings 720

The Real Thing 741

SARAH ORNE JEWETT

A White Heron 759

HA JIN

Saboteur 767

JAMES JOYCE

Araby 775

The Dead 780

K

BEL KAUFMAN

Sunday in the Park 812

GARRISON KEILLOR

The Tip-Top Club 815

STEPHEN KING

The Man in the Black Suit 824

W. P. KINSELLA

Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes

to Lowa 840

RUDYARD KIPLING

They 850

WILLIAM KITTREDGE

We Are Not in This Together 866

L

RING LARDNER

Haircut 883

D. H. LAWRENCE

The Horse Dealer’s Daughter 891

The Rocking-Horse Winner 903

URSULA K. LE GUIN

Horse Camp 914

DORIS LESSING

Wine 917

JACK LONDON

To Build a Fire 921

M

BERNARD MALAMUD

The Magic Barrel 933

KATHERINE MANSFIELD

Her First Ball 946

Miss Brill 951

BOBBIE ANN MASON

Three-Wheeler 955

GUY DE MAUPASSANT

The Necklace 963

Rust 970

MAILE MELOY

Travis, B. 975

HERMAN MELVILLE

Bartleby the Scrivener 986

LORRIE MOORE

You’re Ugly, Too 1013

ALICE MUNRO

Meneseteung 1028

Wild Swans 1043

H. H. MUNRO (“SAKI”),

The Open Window 1051

Sredni Vashtar 1054

N

ANTONYA NELSON

Goodfellows 1058

O

JOYCE CAROL OATES

Four Summers 1078

Where Are You Going,

Where Have You Been? 1083

TIM O’BRIEN

The Things They Carried 1096

FLANNERY O’CONNOR

The Artificial Nigger 1109

A Good Man Is Hard to Find 1124

FRANK O’CONNOR

Guests of the Nation 1136

P

ROBERT PHILLIPS

Surprise! 1145

EDGAR ALLAN POE

The Cask of Amontillado 1149

The Fall of the House of Usher 1155

KATHERINE ANNE PORTER

The Grave 1169

ANNIE PROULX

The Half-Skinned Steer 1174

R

ELWOOD REID

What Salmon Know 1186

S

ANNETTE SANFORD

Nobody Listens When I Talk 1197

JO SAPP

Nadine at 35: A Synopsis 1200

IRWIN SHAW

The Girls in Their Summer

Dresses 1202

LESLIE MARMON SILKO

Yellow Woman 1209

ISSAC BASHEVIS SINGER

Gimpel the Fool 1217

JUNE SPENCE

Missing Women 1227

JOHN STEINBECK

The Chrysanthemums 1233

T

ELIZABETH TALLENT

No One’s a Mystery 1242

JAMES THURBER

The Catbird Seat 1245

LEO TOLSTOY

The Death of Ivan Ilych 1252

JUDY TROY

Ten Miles West of Venus 1292

IVAN TURGENEV

The Country Doctor 1296

U

JOHN UPDIKE

Here Come the Maples 1303

Separating 1312

W

ALICEWALKER

To Hell with Dying 1321

EUDORAWELTY

Petrified Man 1326

DOROTHY WEST

My Baby 1336

WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS

The Use of Force 1342

TOBIASWOLFF

Nightingale 1345

Powder 1351

RICHARDWRIGHT

The Man Who Was

Almost a Man 1354

Z

PATRICIA ZELVER

Love Letters 1363

Biographical Notes 000

A Short Story Handbook 000

Chronological Table of

Contents 000

Credits 000

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Preface

PREFACE

With this ninth edition Fiction 100 passes yet another milestone. The eighth edition celebrated the fact that the book had been in print for 25 years, a full quarter of a century, a fact that surprised no one more than it did the editor. With the ninth edition comes yet another realization: Fiction 100 has now been available to college students and their teachers in four decades: the 1970s, the 1980s, the 1990s, and the first decade of the new millennium. With that realization comes still another: that while the world has changed a great deal since 1974, the aims and structure of Fiction 100 on the whole have not. Then as now I have tried to produce a large book of representative-quality short fiction that could be used in a wide variety of course formats and to do so at a reasonable price.

Another thing that has not changed is the difficulty I have faced in trying to cull the increasingly rich world of short fiction to decide what selections to make. One would think that with a table of contents as large as Fiction 100's such decisions would be relatively easy. They are not. As I long ago discovered, the problem of choice is only multiplied by size. The larger the book, the greater, in fact, the need for principles of selection.

Those that govern Fiction 100 are easily explained. First of all, I have insisted that the stories included must not only have literary merit but must be interesting. Four decades of teaching the short story to college students has persuaded me that any story, if it is to "work" in the classroom, must engage the curiosity, imagination, and intelligence of studentsand provide them with a reading experience they find pleasurable. In addition, I have tried to assemble a collection of stories, international in scope, that represents a wide variety of subject matter, theme, literary technique, and style, and that, at the same time, serves to illustrate the development of short fiction—its continuity, durability, and tradition—from its identifiable beginnings in the early years of the nineteenth century to the present. To the extent possible, I have also asked that the stories "speak to one another" to make possible classroom discussion having to do with comparison and contrast. Roughly a third of the anthology is reserved for older, well-established stories—the so-called classics. They are offered without apology; good stories, no matter how often anthologized, are a source of endless pleasure and discovery that no amount of rereading, classroom discussion, or critical analysis can ever exhaust. On the other hand, Fiction 100 tries to present a broad selection of newer and contemporary stories to suggest the direction in which short fiction is moving as one century gives way to the next.

The book's editorial apparatus remains unchanged. It has been kept to a minimum to make Fiction 100 as usable in as many different kinds of fiction courses as possible. There are, of course, the study questions that follow each story. But these are, by intent, neither complete nor comprehensive. Rather, they are designed to be suggestive, to help guide students in their own literary response, and to serve as a springboard for classroom discussion. In much the same way, the Biographical Notes, Short Story Handbook, and Chronological Table of Contents are intended to provide students with additional resources, tools, and information without getting in the way of their instructor's course format and design.

The most significant change over the four decades has been the book's contents. Of the 100 stories in the 1974 edition, only 34 remain. While the majority of these represent older, nineteenth-century classics, nearly half belong to the twentieth century, suggesting that our definition of the "classic" short story is an ever-expanding one. The other 95 stories—for there are 129 stories in the ninth edition of Fiction 100—reflect my own changing relationship with the genre and my response to the many good suggestions from reviewers, colleagues, and students, including my own most recent students in English 2305 at the University of Houston. Many of those students, I hasten to add, have long since become reviewers, colleagues, and friends—another legacy of these past four decades, and one that I value deeply. All of you have my thanks.

Thanks too go to Carrie Brandon, my editor at Prentice Hall, who, among her other virtues, has one that every author and editor deeply appreciates. She is always there when you need her. I need to also thank the enterprising Fred Courtright, who served as permissions editor during this revision cycle, and whose knowledge and expertise in dealing with the always intricate and time-consuming issue of clearing rights and permissions are simply remarkable. Thanks also go to Joe Barron of P. M. Gordon Associates, Inc., who skillfully guided this ninth edition of Fiction 100 through the various stages of the production process.

If a period crossing four decades—the considerable portion of an adult life-time—provides anything in the way of perspective and wisdom, it is this: that editing Fiction 100 through nine editions has been an extraordinary opportunity for which I will always be grateful. Each new edition has been a genuine labor of love.

James H. Pickering

Read More Show Less

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