Fiction and the American Literary Marketplace: The Role of Newspaper Syndicates in America, 1860-1900 / Edition 1

Fiction and the American Literary Marketplace: The Role of Newspaper Syndicates in America, 1860-1900 / Edition 1

by Charles Johanningsmeier
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521520185

ISBN-13: 9780521520188

Pub. Date: 07/08/2002

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Conventional literary history has virtually ignored the role of newspaper syndicates in publishing some of the most famous nineteenth century writers. Henry James, Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain were among those who offered their early fiction to 'Syndicates', firms which subsequently sold the work to newspapers across America for simultaneous, first-time publication.

Overview

Conventional literary history has virtually ignored the role of newspaper syndicates in publishing some of the most famous nineteenth century writers. Henry James, Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain were among those who offered their early fiction to 'Syndicates', firms which subsequently sold the work to newspapers across America for simultaneous, first-time publication. Charles Johanningsmeier shows how the economic practicalities of the syndicate system governed the consumption and interpretation of various literary texts. His study revises your conception of traditional literary history by examining the ordinary reader's response to some of the major writers of the nineteenth century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521520188
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
07/08/2002
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History Series
Edition description:
First Paperback Edition
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.67(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction; Newspaper syndicates of the late nineteenth century: overlooked forces in the American literary marketplace; 1. Preparing the way for the syndicates: a revolution in American fiction production, distribution, and readership, 1860-1900; 2. The pioneers: readyprint, plate service, and early galley-proof syndicates; 3. The heyday of American fiction syndication: Irvin Bacheller, S. S. McClure and other independent syndicators; 4. What literary syndicates represented to authors: saviours, doctors, or something in between?; 5. What price must authors pay? The negotiations between galley-proof syndicates and authors; 6. Pleasing the customers: the balance of power between syndicates and newspaper editors; 7. Readers' experiences with syndicated fiction; 8. The decline of the literary syndicates; Notes; Bibliography.

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