Field: The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe

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Overview

Science has recently begun to prove what ancient myth and religion have always espoused: There may be such a thing as a life force.

In this groundbreaking classic, investigative journalist Lynne McTaggart reveals a radical new paradigm—that the human mind and body are not separate from their environment but a packet of pulsating power constantly interacting with this vast energy sea, and that consciousness may be central in shaping our world....

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2002 Hard cover New in new dust jacket. Inventory mark on the edge. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 288 p. Audience: General/trade.

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Overview

Science has recently begun to prove what ancient myth and religion have always espoused: There may be such a thing as a life force.

In this groundbreaking classic, investigative journalist Lynne McTaggart reveals a radical new paradigm—that the human mind and body are not separate from their environment but a packet of pulsating power constantly interacting with this vast energy sea, and that consciousness may be central in shaping our world.

The Field is a highly readable scientific detective story presenting a stunning picture of an interconnected universe and a new scientific theory that makes sense of supernatural phenomena. Documented by distinguished sources, The Field is a book of hope and inspiration for today's world.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Lewis Carroll's Alice would have relished the Zero Point Field. The electromagnetic zero-point field of the quantum vacuum, as it is more precisely called, is a field of unimaginably large quantum energy in the infinitesimal space between things. According to Lynne McTaggert, this tiny yet vast ocean of microscopic vibrations could hold the key to many of life's Big Questions. Indeed, this so-called "dead" space could be the gateway into the hidden mysteries of ESP, spiritual healing, and remote viewing. In The Field, McTaggert documents the curious (and thrilling) history of this almost mystic concept and why it appeals to poets, astrophysicists, and Tom Clancy fans alike.
Publishers Weekly
McTaggart, an investigative journalist (What Doctors Don't Tell You), describes scientific discoveries that she believes point to a unifying concept of the universe, one that reconciles mind with matter, classic Newtonian science with quantum physics and, most importantly, science with religion. At issue is the zero point field, the so-called "dead space" of microscopic vibrations in outer space as well as within and between physical objects on earth. These fields, McTaggart asserts, are a "cobweb of energy exchange" that link everything in the universe; they control everything from cellular communication to the workings of the mind, and they could be harnessed for unlimited propulsion fuel, levitation, ESP, spiritual healing and more. Physicists have been aware of the likelihood of this field for years, McTaggart writes, but, constrained by orthodoxy, they have ignored its effects, which she likens to "subtracting out God" from their equations. But, McTaggart asserts, "tiny pockets of quiet rebellion" against scientific convention are emerging, led by Ed Mitchell, an Apollo 14 astronaut and founder of the Institute for Noetic Sciences, an alternative-science think tank. McTaggart writes well and tells a good story, but the supporting data here is somewhat sketchy. Until it materializes, McTaggart may have to settle for being a voice in the wilderness. (July) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060193003
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 7/23/2002
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.29 (w) x 9.35 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist, author, and founder/editor for leading health newsletters in the U.K. and U.S. She founded Living the Field, a master class that uses the ideas of The Field in everyday life, and hosts international conferences on the science of spirituality.
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Read an Excerpt

The Field Updated Ed
The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe

Chapter One

Light in the Darkness

Perhaps what happened to Ed Mitchell was due to the lack of gravity, or maybe to the fact that all his senses had been disoriented. He had been on his way home, which at the moment was approximately 250,000 miles away, somewhere on the surface of the clouded azure and white crescent appearing intermittently through the triangular window of the command module of the Apollo 14.

Two days before, he had become the sixth man to land on the moon. The trip had been a triumph: the first lunar landing to carry out scientific investigations. The 94 pounds of rock and soil samples in the hold attested to that. Although he and his commander, Alan Shepard, hadn't reached the summit of the 750-foot-high ancient Cone Crater, the rest of the items on the meticulous schedule taped to their wrists, detailing virtually every minute of their two-day journey, had been methodically ticked off.

What they hadn't fully accounted for was the effect of this uninhabited world, low in gravity, devoid of the diluting effect of atmosphere, on the senses. Without signposts such as trees or telephone wires, or indeed anything other than the Antares, the gold insect-like lunar module, on the full sweep of the dust-grey landscape, all perceptions of space, scale, distance or depth were horribly distorted; Ed had been shocked to discover that any points of navigation which had been carefully noted on high-resolution photographs were at least double the distance expected. It was as though he and Alan had shrunk during space travel and what from home had appeared tobe tiny humps and ridges on the moon's surface had suddenly swollen to heights of six feet or more. And yet if they felt diminished in size, they were also lighter than ever. He'd experienced an odd lightness of being, from the weak gravitational pull, and despite the weight and bulk of his ungainly spacesuit, felt buoyed at every step.

There had also been the distorting effect of the sun, pure and unadulterated in this airless world. In the blinding sunlight, even in the relatively cool morning, before the highs that might reach 270° F, craters, landmarks, soil and the earth -- even the sky itself -- all stood out in absolute clarity. For a mind accustomed to the soft filter of atmosphere, the sharp shadows, the changeable colors of the slate-grey soil all conspired to play tricks on the eye. Unknowingly he and Alan had been only 61 feet from Cone Crater's edge, about 10 seconds away, when they turned back, convinced that they wouldn't reach it in time -- a failure that would bitterly disappoint Ed, who'd longed to stare into that 1100-foot diameter hole in the midst of the lunar uplands. Their eyes didn't know how to interpret this hyperstate of vision. Nothing lived, but also nothing was hidden from view, and everything lacked subtlety. Every sight overwhelmed the eye with brilliant contrasts and shadows. He was seeing, in a sense, more clearly and less clearly than he ever had.

During the relentless activity of their schedule, there had been little time for reflection or wonder, or for any thoughts of a larger purpose to the trip. They had gone farther in the universe than any man before them, and yet, weighed down by the knowledge that they were costing the American taxpayers $200,000 a minute, they felt compelled to keep their eyes on the clock, ticking off the details of what Houston had planned in their packed schedule. Only after the lunar module had reconnected with the command module and begun the two-day journey back to earth could Ed pull off his spacesuit, now filthy with lunar soil, sit back in his long johns and try to put his frustration and his jumble of thoughts into some sort of order.

The Kittyhawk was slowly rotating, like a chicken on a spit, in order to balance the thermal effect on each side of the spacecraft; and in its slow revolution, earth was intermittently framed through the window as a tiny crescent in an all-engulfing night of stars. From this perspective, as the earth traded places in and out of view with the rest of the solar system, sky didn't exist only above the astronauts, as we ordinarily view it, but as an all-encompassing entity that cradled the earth from all sides.

It was then, while staring out of the window, that Ed experienced the strangest feeling he would ever have: a feeling of connectedness, as if all the planets and all the people of all time were attached by some invisible web. He could hardly breathe from the majesty of the moment. Although he continued to turn knobs and press buttons, he felt distanced from his body, as though someone else were doing the navigating.

There seemed to be an enormous force field here, connecting all people, their intentions and thoughts, and every animate and inanimate form of matter for all time. Anything he did or thought would influence the rest of the cosmos, and every occurrence in the cosmos would have a similar effect on him. Time was just an artificial construct. Everything he'd been taught about the universe and the separateness of people and things felt wrong. There were no accidents or individual intentions. The natural intelligence that had gone on for billions of years, that had forged the very molecules of his being, was also responsible for his own present journey. This wasn't something he was simply comprehending in his mind, but an overwhelmingly visceral feeling, as though he were physically extending out of the window to the very furthest reaches of the cosmos.

He hadn't seen the face of God. It didn't feel like a standard religious experience so much as a blinding epiphany of meaning -- what the Eastern religions often term an 'ecstasy of unity'. It was as though in a single instant Ed Mitchell had discovered and felt The Force. He stole a glance at Alan and Stu Roosa ...

The Field Updated Ed
The Quest for the Secret Force of the Universe
. Copyright © by Lynne McTaggart. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. <%END%>
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First Chapter

Chapter One

Light in the Darkness

Perhaps what happened to Ed Mitchell was due to the lack of gravity, or maybe to the fact that all his senses had been disoriented. He had been on his way home, which at the moment was approximately 250,000 miles away, somewhere on the surface of the clouded azure and white crescent appearing intermittently through the triangular window of the command module of the Apollo 14.

Two days before, he had become the sixth man to land on the moon. The trip had been a triumph: the first lunar landing to carry out scientific investigations. The 94 pounds of rock and soil samples in the hold attested to that. Although he and his commander, Alan Shepard, hadn't reached the summit of the 750-foot-high ancient Cone Crater, the rest of the items on the meticulous schedule taped to their wrists, detailing virtually every minute of their two-day journey, had been methodically ticked off.

What they hadn't fully accounted for was the effect of this uninhabited world, low in gravity, devoid of the diluting effect of atmosphere, on the senses. Without signposts such as trees or telephone wires, or indeed anything other than the Antares, the gold insect-like lunar module, on the full sweep of the dust-grey landscape, all perceptions of space, scale, distance or depth were horribly distorted; Ed had been shocked to discover that any points of navigation which had been carefully noted on high-resolution photographs were at least double the distance expected. It was as though he and Alan had shrunk during space travel and what from home had appeared to be tiny humps and ridges on the moon's surface hadsuddenly swollen to heights of six feet or more. And yet if they felt diminished in size, they were also lighter than ever. He'd experienced an odd lightness of being, from the weak gravitational pull, and despite the weight and bulk of his ungainly spacesuit, felt buoyed at every step.

There had also been the distorting effect of the sun, pure and unadulterated in this airless world. In the blinding sunlight, even in the relatively cool morning, before the highs that might reach 270° F, craters, landmarks, soil and the earth -- even the sky itself -- all stood out in absolute clarity. For a mind accustomed to the soft filter of atmosphere, the sharp shadows, the changeable colors of the slate-grey soil all conspired to play tricks on the eye. Unknowingly he and Alan had been only 61 feet from Cone Crater's edge, about 10 seconds away, when they turned back, convinced that they wouldn't reach it in time -- a failure that would bitterly disappoint Ed, who'd longed to stare into that 1100-foot diameter hole in the midst of the lunar uplands. Their eyes didn't know how to interpret this hyperstate of vision. Nothing lived, but also nothing was hidden from view, and everything lacked subtlety. Every sight overwhelmed the eye with brilliant contrasts and shadows. He was seeing, in a sense, more clearly and less clearly than he ever had.

During the relentless activity of their schedule, there had been little time for reflection or wonder, or for any thoughts of a larger purpose to the trip. They had gone farther in the universe than any man before them, and yet, weighed down by the knowledge that they were costing the American taxpayers $200,000 a minute, they felt compelled to keep their eyes on the clock, ticking off the details of what Houston had planned in their packed schedule. Only after the lunar module had reconnected with the command module and begun the two-day journey back to earth could Ed pull off his spacesuit, now filthy with lunar soil, sit back in his long johns and try to put his frustration and his jumble of thoughts into some sort of order.

The Kittyhawk was slowly rotating, like a chicken on a spit, in order to balance the thermal effect on each side of the spacecraft; and in its slow revolution, earth was intermittently framed through the window as a tiny crescent in an all-engulfing night of stars. From this perspective, as the earth traded places in and out of view with the rest of the solar system, sky didn't exist only above the astronauts, as we ordinarily view it, but as an all-encompassing entity that cradled the earth from all sides.

It was then, while staring out of the window, that Ed experienced the strangest feeling he would ever have: a feeling of connectedness, as if all the planets and all the people of all time were attached by some invisible web. He could hardly breathe from the majesty of the moment. Although he continued to turn knobs and press buttons, he felt distanced from his body, as though someone else were doing the navigating.

There seemed to be an enormous force field here, connecting all people, their intentions and thoughts, and every animate and inanimate form of matter for all time. Anything he did or thought would influence the rest of the cosmos, and every occurrence in the cosmos would have a similar effect on him. Time was just an artificial construct. Everything he'd been taught about the universe and the separateness of people and things felt wrong. There were no accidents or individual intentions. The natural intelligence that had gone on for billions of years, that had forged the very molecules of his being, was also responsible for his own present journey. This wasn't something he was simply comprehending in his mind, but an overwhelmingly visceral feeling, as though he were physically extending out of the window to the very furthest reaches of the cosmos.

He hadn't seen the face of God. It didn't feel like a standard religious experience so much as a blinding epiphany of meaning -- what the Eastern religions often term an 'ecstasy of unity'. It was as though in a single instant Ed Mitchell had discovered and felt The Force. He stole a glance at Alan and Stu Roosa ...

The Field. Copyright © by Lynne McTaggart. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 34 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 26, 2011

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    Non Scientific

    Very New Ageish. Taking a few scientific facts and overlaying them with LOTS of metaphysical speculation.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2004

    If I didn't know it was non-fiction I'd think it was fiction

    This is fantastic! I have never read about all of this scientific research, about the 'field' that connects everything, including thoughts and matter. This is a great book and very well written too. Just great, and it would make a great topic for a discussion group -- great food for thought in here.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Scientists Explore the Last Frontier - the Zero Point Field

    With an ear for human interest and eye for detail, Lynne McTaggart masterfully tells the true story in THE FIELD of how pioneers in science and consciousness research are working to achieve a more complete understanding of the true nature of reality -- an understanding which includes (rather than ignores) consciousness. THE FIELD describes how scientists have gradually become aware of what appears to be a unifying energy structure in our universe. This 'Zero Point Field' provides us with a simpler explanation for how things work than previous overly-complex ideas require. Simplicity in science is a good thing, because it generally indicates which theories will win out as time goes by. The Zero Point Field theory demonstrates it's elegant simplicity by allowing physicists to derive the famous equation F=ma (rather than take it as a starting assumption), and by helping medical practitioners understand the underlying scientific basis for homeopathy. Our scientific conceptualization of this universe has changed considerably over the last few centuries and now faces one of the biggest overhauls ever -- and THE FIELD demonstrates why the Zero Point Field is likely to be the last frontier for us to explore. THE FIELD is packed with detailed descriptions of some of the most exciting experiments recently conducted by leading researchers in the field of consciousness such as: Cleve Backster, Jacques Benveniste, William Braud, Bob Jahn, Edgar Mitchell, Fritz-Albert Popp, Hal Puthoff, Rupert Sheldrake, Russell Targ, Elisabeth Targ, and Charles Tart. I give this book my highest recommendation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2003

    I LOVED this book!

    I have never read a book that so rocked my world. It is breathtaking. I cannot recommend it highly enough to anyone who is curious about how the world works, or wants to learn what is beyond traditional science's reduction of the world (and us) to nothing more than mechanical pieces functioning in set ways. No, I take that back. Everyone should read this book. It is THE layman's guide to the cutting edge of physics. I will never look at anything, from the apple on my desk to the beating of my heart to the thoughts in my head, in the same way again. My only warning is that it may cause you many sleepless nights.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    exactly what I needed. thank you so much. All this time, I thou

    exactly what I needed. thank you so much.

    All this time, I thought it was just me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Lynn McTaggart is awesome!

    Lynn McTaggart never fails to amaze me. I learn something new everytime I read one of her books. This is a book I placed in my library and refuse to part with. I've read it multiple times and enjoy more each time. Useful information and inspriing to think the world is still full of magic. This book is easy to read and understand. Lynn talks with various scientists and puts the most cutting edge quantum physics in a language everyone can understand. Discusses scientific research by top universities and by our own government. This book put all the pieces together for me. I've even used names of scientists from this book to find other books written on the subject. I highly recommend this book. I added it to my permanent library.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 5, 2010

    Is this audio cd as good as the book?

    The audio cd does not say how long it is and therefore it might just be a short rendering of the book. Is it???

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  • Posted December 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A few new Ideals!

    Well read

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