Field of Honor

Overview

In D. L. Birchfield’s Field of Honor, a secret underground civilization of Choctaws, deep beneath the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma, has evolved into a high-tech culture, supported by the labor of slaves kidnapped from the surface. Underground, long yellow rows of corn stand tall and ripe in immense, brightly lit greenhouses, and great games of stickball are played in the dark in huge stadiums with glowing balls.

The twentieth century has been one long, golden ...

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Overview

In D. L. Birchfield’s Field of Honor, a secret underground civilization of Choctaws, deep beneath the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma, has evolved into a high-tech culture, supported by the labor of slaves kidnapped from the surface. Underground, long yellow rows of corn stand tall and ripe in immense, brightly lit greenhouses, and great games of stickball are played in the dark in huge stadiums with glowing balls.

The twentieth century has been one long, golden summer for this underground Choctaw community, where nothing is more important than the ball games. Here Choctaw traditions are safe from the cultural genocide being waged in the world above. But crisis is about to strike the underground community, threatening its continued existence.

Into this idyllic underground Choctaw world stumbles P. P. McDaniel, a half-blood Choctaw Marine Corps deserter from the Vietnam War who has the great misfortune of suffering from Stockholm Cowardice Syndrome Dysfunction. Reeling from culture shock and struggling for his own survival, McDaniel becomes entangled in political intrigue and an unlikely romance in this rich satire.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780806136080
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Publication date: 5/28/2004
  • Series: American Indian Literature Series
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

D. L. Birchfield is a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. His Oklahoma Basic Intelligence Test won the North American Native Authors First Book Award from the Native Writers' Circle of the Americas and the University of Oklahoma.

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Table of Contents

Part 1. Stockholm Cowardice Syndrome Dysfunction 1
Part 2. The Children of the Sun 95
Part 3. The Secret of Bugaboo Canyon 217
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2004

    A new genre

    In his first novel author Donald Birchfield may have created a new genre - a madcap combination of suspense, Indian history and military farce. A member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and a professor of Native American Studies at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, Birchfield is known by his peers as a man of dry wit and expertise in Choctaw history. One wishes to have read Birchfield's soon-to-be published history of the Choctaws before reading Field of Honor, for it would surely enrich the cunningly imparted Choctaw history in this book. But it's not just history Birchfield imparts, but a witty lampoon on whites, academia, Christians, the military and even, at times, Choctaws. It's a wild ride, one that only the author of 'The Oklahoma Basic Intelligence Test, and Other New and Collected Elementary, Epistolary, Autobiographical, and Oratorical Choctologies' could conceive of.

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