Field of Thirteen

Field of Thirteen

4.7 11
by Dick Francis
     
 

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A superbly crafted collection of thirteen tightly plotted tales that treats readers to murder, mystery, and mayhem in the world of horseracing.See more details below

Overview

A superbly crafted collection of thirteen tightly plotted tales that treats readers to murder, mystery, and mayhem in the world of horseracing.

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Inquirer
Dick Francis has the knack. Which, clearly, is never going to desert him. It's the seemingly simple, most-writers-would-kill-for knack.
Nikki Amdur
This mesmerizing collection of short stories shows the literary jockey at the top of his game. . . . Whether it's an elegy for a sportswriter on the skids or the ballad of a Welsh groom and her social-climbing daughter, the stories linger long after you turn the page.
Entertainment Weekly
San Francisco Chronicle
You can always depend on Dick Francis for a rousing good story.
Phoebe-Lou Adams
The thefts and scams are. . .admirable; a couple are . . .enticingly plausible. . . —The Atlantic Monthly
San Diego Union-Tribune
Dick Francis remains one of the most inventive and entertaining storytellers of our time, that rare performer who can both satisfy his audience and leave them hungry for more. Francis never fails to boot home a winner.
People Magazine
[Francis] once again saddles up a winner in this fast-paced collection of stories set in the racing world.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Though nearly two score of his novels have come to print, Francis has published only eight short stories in his 41 years as a bestselling author. That octet, composed mostly in the 1970s and initially appearing in various journals (Sports Illustrated, the Times of London, etc.), is reprinted here, along with five new tales, each introduced in brief by Francis. There's not a slacker among them, though few champions either. The earliest yarn, "Carrot for a Chestnut," dating from 1970 (eight years after Francis's first novel), is typical, presenting a morally ordered universe in which malefactors get their due, albeit commonly through indirect means. Here, a jockey who bends a race by feeding a horse a drugged carrot receives his comeuppance by losing his concentration as a result of his crime and getting involved in a nasty accident; as in most of the stories, there's a light twist to the ending. Horse racing figures in every entry, of course. Sometimes it's the focus of a crime--as in "Blind Chance," in which a blind boy picks up on how bettors are getting inside info on races with photo finishes. Sometimes, it's only background, as in "Collision Course," about how a fired newspaper editor hoists poetic justice upon a horrid restaurateur/horse trainer. Most of the stories are superficially clever, but below the quick plotting there's emotional depth; in "Spring Fever," for instance, Francis plumbs the innocent desperation of unrequited December-May love. And throughout there is Francis's voice, strong, smart, ironic, developed even at the beginning but maturing in timbre as he hones his skill. Even more than the horse racing, this voice is the tie that binds these 13 tales into a charmed entertainment. (Sept.)
Phoebe-Lou Adams
The thefts and scams are. . .admirable; a couple are . . .enticingly plausible. . . -- The Atlantic Monthly
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Dick Francis has the knack. Which, clearly, is never going to desert him. It's the seemingly simple, most-writers-would-kill-for knack.
Union-Tribune San Diego
Dick Francis remains one of the most inventive and entertaining storytellers of our time, that rare performer who can both satisfy his audience and leave them hungry for more. Francis never fails to boot home a winner.
Kirkus Reviews
In lieu of his annual novel (10 Lb. Penalty), horseracing's gift to the mystery offers his fans his first collection of shorts, including five colts appearing in their first event and eight fillies who've been around the track once or twice. Most of the new stories are horsey parables of revenge. A small-town newspaper editor plots against the restaurant that humiliated his guests; a mild expatriate Brit patiently pursues legal remedies against the lawyer who swindled him out of the bail money he put up for an acquaintance; a couple of means gets even with the social-climbing daughter who neglected her mother, their faithful groom; a timely accident puts paid to the plans of a hit man and the jockey who hired him. The last story, 'Haig's Death,' about the effects of a race judge's fatal heart attack on the owners of the entrants, is the most original.

From the Publisher
"[Field of Thirteen] starts with a gallop and remains strong throughout." -USA Today

"Mesmerizing...shows the literary jockey at the top of his game." -Entertainment Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440622106
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/02/2004
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
129,227
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"[Field of Thirteen] starts with a gallop and remains strong throughout." -USA Today

"Mesmerizing...shows the literary jockey at the top of his game." -Entertainment Weekly

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