The Fight to Survive: A Young Girl, Diabetes, and the Discovery of Insulin [NOOK Book]

Overview

In 1919, when 11-year-old Elizabeth Evan Hughes was first diagnosed with what we now know is Type 1 or juvenile diabetes, the medical community considered it a death sentence. In The Fight to Survive, Caroline Cox weaves the heart-wrenching story of Hughes’ role in a medical discovery that stopped the disease in its tracks—only weeks before her imminent death. The only account of one of the very first patients to be successfully treated with insulin for juvenile diabetes, this book tells two fascinating stories ...
See more details below
The Fight to Survive: A Young Girl, Diabetes, and the Discovery of Insulin

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

In 1919, when 11-year-old Elizabeth Evan Hughes was first diagnosed with what we now know is Type 1 or juvenile diabetes, the medical community considered it a death sentence. In The Fight to Survive, Caroline Cox weaves the heart-wrenching story of Hughes’ role in a medical discovery that stopped the disease in its tracks—only weeks before her imminent death. The only account of one of the very first patients to be successfully treated with insulin for juvenile diabetes, this book tells two fascinating stories in tandem: that of Hughes’ personal struggle, and the medical detective story that occurred during a time when endocrinology research made significant strides. It was Frederick Banting and John Macleod, doctors and researchers, who were finally able to create a testable version of insulin treatment to save Hughes’ life. She lived until the age of 74, and Banting and Macleod won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work. The Fight to Survive draws on primary sources to vividly bring the era to life, including interviews, newspaper reports, and Hughes’ own letters. Readers with an interest in medical history, pathographies, biography, diabetes, and American history will constitute this audience.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Elizabeth Hughes's is a small story, filled with the optimism of a 14-year-old with unbounded dreams. But there was nothing small about the discovery of insulin and the trials in August 1922 that saved Hughes and revolutionized the treatment of diabetes: patients “in a wretched, depleted state... brought back from imminent death” in what one researcher called “near resurrections.” Hughes lucked out: her father, Charles, as governor of New York and a GOP heavyweight, was able to get her into the original trial. Alternating the teen's painful, isolated childhood with the struggle of researchers hoping to save patients diagnosed with a then fatal disease, Cox (a historian at the University of the Pacific) weaves a compelling tale of commitment and discovery. Elizabeth “always had confidence in her future,” Cox writes, even as she withered away on a near-starvation diet—the only known treatment before insulin. Her saviors—including 1923 Nobel Prize winners Frederick Banting and John Macleod—ultimately reaped “fame, glory and prizes,” but found it tempered by bitterness and divisions within the team. Here is both a remarkable medical history and an inspiring lesson in hope. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Cox (history, Univ. of the Pacific) interweaves the stories of Elizabeth Hughes, the diabetic daughter of secretary of state and later Supreme Court justice Charles Evans Hughes, and the early treatments of diabetes with the events and personalities that led to insulin's discovery. The narrative unfolds against the backdrop of aristocratic life in the early 20th century, which did not spare the ill from the starvation diets used to treat diabetes prior to insulin. In this engaging account of the discovery of insulin, Cox honestly describes the mixture of service and ego that led to the breakthrough. Elizabeth's recovery story reminds readers that medical discoveries can powerfully transform lives and of the resiliency of young adults in the face of disease. VERDICT Despite its uneven quality, the book has moments of analytic clarity and moving portrayal reminiscent of other books that combine biography and medicine, such as Jay Neugeboren's Imagining Robert and Jane Taylor McDonnell's News from the Border.—Aaron Klink, Duke Univ., Durham, NC
Kirkus Reviews
The story of Elizabeth Evan Hughes-who in 1919 was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in the era before insulin-interwoven with a brief account of the research that led to insulin's discovery. Cox (History/Univ. of the Pacific) builds the narrative from Hughes's letters, her privately held diaries and other writings and the reminiscences of her children. A daughter of Charles Evans Hughes, a major figure in Republican politics-governor of New York, U.S. Supreme Court justice, U.S. Secretary of State-the young Hughes was a privileged yet extraordinarily self-disciplined child. When she was first diagnosed at age 11, there was no cure for diabetes, but with strict adherence to an extremely low-calorie diet, death could be postponed for a while. As Cox reveals, Hughes complied wholeheartedly if somewhat stoically to the starvation regimen. The author aims to understand just how this happened. With liberal use of excerpts, she shows the child's temperament-to her parents, from whom she was often separated, she kept up a generally cheerful front-the expectations and resources of her family and the tenor of the times. Cox briefly sketches the scientific story, profiling the researchers and doctors involved, the conflicts and antagonisms that arose among them and their final triumph. Hughes was not the first patient whose life was saved by insulin, but her family's prominence and her mother's persistence made her one of the earliest beneficiaries. In August 1922, Hughes, who had lived on a scant 800 calories per day for three years and weighed only 48 pounds, received her first shot of insulin. The following year, two of the researchers on the project, Frederick Banting and John Macleod, receivedthe Nobel Prize in Medicine. A pleasant little profile in courage.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607146056
  • Publisher: Kaplan Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/15/2010
  • Sold by: Kaplan, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 443,881
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Caroline Cox is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA. She is the author of A Proper Sense of Honor: Service and Sacrifice in George Washington's Army. She has also written numerous articles for history publications and has appeared as a commentator on the History Channel.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 The Dread Diabetes 1

2 A Good, Obedient Daughter 23

3 A Long Time to Be Away 51

4 Showing Traces All the Time 77

5 How I Do Love Writing 99

6 Oh How I Dote on Reading 127

7 Born Under a Lucky Star 151

8 The Shot Heard Round the World 175

9 I Have Nothing to Complain Of 201

About This Book 231

Bibliography 235

Index 245

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)