Filbert, the Good Little Fiend by Hiawyn Oram, Jimmy Liao |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Filbert, the Good Little Fiend

Filbert, the Good Little Fiend

5.0 1
by Hiawyn Oram, Jimmy Liao
     
 

A little fiend who’s too good for his own good befriends an angel who is too naughty—and together they concoct a clever plan.

Daddy and Mommy Fiend want their little Filbert to be gruesome and ghastly, but he won’t trample or terrify, roar or holler. He’d much rather help an old lady with her bags or go bird-watching. What are they

Overview

A little fiend who’s too good for his own good befriends an angel who is too naughty—and together they concoct a clever plan.

Daddy and Mommy Fiend want their little Filbert to be gruesome and ghastly, but he won’t trample or terrify, roar or holler. He’d much rather help an old lady with her bags or go bird-watching. What are they to do with him? When Filbert starts school, he quickly learns that good behavior isn’t tolerated in class, and he is banished outside until he can act like a proper little fiend. Suddenly a little angel appears, flying fast and furious until...bump! Could this naughty Angel-School dropout be just the friend Filbert needs? Could they find a way together to make everyone accept them as they are?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jody Little
Little Filbert does not want to be a nasty, horrible fiend like his parents and the other kids at school. He would much rather watch birds, and help little old ladies, and listen to nice bedtime stories. His parents are appalled. They want him to be a gruesome and ghastly little fiend. His teacher does too. When Filbert refuses to participate in the purple paint fight at school, he is sent out to the grassy Good Spot to think about his good behavior. By chance, he meets Florinda, a not so nice angel, who has been sent out of Angel School for not being good enough. They become quick friends and come up with an idea to make everyone appreciate them just the way they are. Filled with rich, colorful and humorous illustrations, this story of friendship and acceptance will bring laughter and smiles to readers and listeners, young and old. Reviewer: Jody Little
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Oram takes on a tried-and-true theme in this pleasant but unexceptional outing. Little Fiend Filbert disappoints his monstrous parents and teacher because he is entirely too good. After he behaves well one too many times, Miss Fearsome-Frizz sends him outside to the "grassy Good Spot" where a poorly behaved little angel bumps into a tree and lands near him. Filbert dons Florinda's wings, halo, and dress, while she tries on his Max-esque horned, tailed, and clawed furry outfit. They return to their respective classrooms, prompting their teachers to beg them to go back to being themselves, and they become best friends. The text reads aloud smoothly, despite an overuse of capital letters to emphasize words. The brightly colored fiend family is reminiscent of the characters in the film version of Shrek, and the saturated hues are eye-catching. Busy, flowery borders around a few text pages don't marry well with the story, but touches like the clothes exchange, done in comiclike panels, work well, and Filbert's horned suit is particularly appealing. The story is amusing, if didactic, and the intended audience will enjoy it. Nevertheless, from Munro Leaf's Ferdinand to Leo Lionni's Cornelius to Kevin Henkes's Lilly to Ellen Stoll Walsh's frog Betsy, picture-book characters have been standing up for self-acceptance for years, and this adds nothing new to the canon.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT
Kirkus Reviews
An adorable little fiend that looks a bit like a Wild Thing is--disappointingly--anything but. Mommy and Daddy Fiend have great expectations for their little one. They want him to be fierce, ferocious, "gruesome and ghastly," just like them. But Filbert has a different nature. Instead, he is helpful, prefers nice stories and dreams about flowers. His parents send him off for the first day of school decked out in "his fiery red coat, horrifying horns, and monstrous mittens" and the hope that he will "be a proper little fiend." But quiet Filbert refuses to participate in the monstrous activities and is banished to "the grassy Good Spot" (which might as well be a cork tree). Filbert's happy reverie is interrupted when a little angel crash-lands. They soon discover their similar predicaments: Florinda is a not-very-good angel who has been banished from Angel School. They hatch a plan to exchange clothes, go back to their respective schools and really freak out their peers, ultimately leading to their respective acceptances. Liao ably paints the contrasting settings in watercolor and gouache and lends further charm to Oram's appealing characters. For fans of Ferdinand and anyone who wants to share the message of celebrating or at least respecting differences. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763658700
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
07/09/2013
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 11.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Hiawyn Oram has been writing children’s books for more than twenty years and is the author of more than sixty titles. A recipient of the Japanese Picture Book Award and the Prix du Livre Culturel, Hiawyn Oram lives in London.

Jimmy Liao is a best-selling, award-winning author-illustrator whose books with Candlewick include The World Champion of Staying Awake by Sean Taylor and The Monster Who Ate Darkness by Joyce Dunbar. Jimmy Liao lives in Taiwan.

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