Final Cut Pro 3 and DVD Studio Pro Handbook

Final Cut Pro 3 and DVD Studio Pro Handbook

4.0 1
by Adam Watkins
     
 
With recent advances in technology, the exciting realms of digital editing and DVD authoring are now within reach of most graphics professionals. Until now, editing and rendering animations to fit on VHS and compressing digital images for delivery meant sacrificing quality. But with Apple Final Cut Pro 3, DVD Studio Pro, and the practical guidance found in this book,

Overview

With recent advances in technology, the exciting realms of digital editing and DVD authoring are now within reach of most graphics professionals. Until now, editing and rendering animations to fit on VHS and compressing digital images for delivery meant sacrificing quality. But with Apple Final Cut Pro 3, DVD Studio Pro, and the practical guidance found in this book, designers and animators can edit and deliver their creations with excellent results. Written for graphics professionals, animators, video artists, and users of Final Cut Pro and other popular video packages (iMovie, iDVD, Premiere), the Final Cut Pro 3 and DVD Studio Pro Handbook provides hands-on practice for the entire digital editing process. The book is broken into two main parts. Part One provides an in depth look at FCP and basic cinematography and editing concepts. It includes a detailed review of non-linear digital video editing (NLDVE), outlines the technical specifications for DVD, and provides a comprehensive overview of Final Cut Pro 3. From there the book delves into the process of editing and delivering media productions. Using raw video files from the book?s companion DVD, users work through every step of the editing process, from importing and editing media, to audio techniques, effects, outputting FCP data, and exporting to DVD. In Part Two, users learn how to use the core features of DVD Studio Pro, such as creating compressed media, importing streaming media, designing still and motion based menus, adding fully functional interactivity, and integrating subtitles.

Editorial Reviews

Explains how to edit video on a computer with Apple's Final Cut Pro editing suite, and burn DVD copies of the final product with DVD Studio Pro. Tutorials walk step-by-step through the process of logging and capturing footage, layering multiple tracks, placing sequences within sequences, embedding alpha channels, and creating a DVD menu in Photoshop. The DVD contains media files for the tutorials. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584502005
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
07/01/2002
Series:
Digital Filmmaking Ser.
Edition description:
BK&CD-ROM
Pages:
382
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.81(d)

Meet the Author

Adam Watkins (San Antonio, TX) is the director of Computer Arts at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. He has a BFA in theater set and lighting design, and an MFA in graphic design. His previous books include The Maya 4.5 Handbook, Final Cut Pro 3 and DVD Studio Pro Handbook, and 3D Animation: From Models to Movies.

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Final Cut Pro 3 and DVD Studio Pro Handbook 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Recently, I was given the privilege to practice using Final Cut Pro on a friend of mine's Mac. I had had no previous Mac experience whatsoever but I was eager to edit video in some shape or form, so in I delved. To guide me, I was given the book 'Final Cut Pro 3 & DVD Pro' as a tutorial. I promptly copied the necessary files from the DVD and began on lesson one. I quickly overcame many of the challenges presented by not knowing how to use a Mac and was soon moving very quickly through the book. The first project in the book, labeled 'Sync China', was very confusing at first. This was partly due to the fact that I had little experience with anything related to this program or operating system. While the author never stated that I should have, it becomes apparent halfway through the book that the video clips aren't all completely labeled. It is very easy to finish the project with many extraneous clips not even viewed much less used. It is advisable that. Before starting any project from the book, that a person goes through and familiarize him/herself with the video clips. This allows the user a.) To rename the clips with titles deemed more appropriate and familiar by the user and b.) To give the user an idea of what he/she will be dealing with. Progress through the book is a bit slow at some points but the end results are well worth it. The result of the first project provides great satisfaction, as there was much freedom in editing. Many directions take are from the same family as: 'Place as many clips of whatever you want right here. Proceed when you are done.' The second project lends a somewhat simplified and basic attempt at special effects and green/blue screen technology. Short, easily over before the user realizes it, the project at least shows the process, theory and practice behind superimposing. Not in depth but nonetheless worth any person's while. The last project consists of editing an interview of a man regaling his experiences 'in the war'. Final Cut Pro is shown a little more in depth than the 'Sync China' project, allowing the user to fully use many of the tools available. The focus of the editing in the last project is mainly upon superimposing images and finding the best times to transition in an interview. The very last part of the book, though not necessarily a project, is about how to use DVD Pro. The connectivity of the two programs in the book is very interesting as the DVD Pro tutorial's focus is on creating a DVD of the last three projects created using Final Cut Pro. DVD theory is introduced but can easily be skipped for those knowledgeable of that field. The book very simply lays down the basics and, as with the last tutorials allows the user to do whatever he/she wants as long as it follows the guidelines of the book. As with many DVD Creator software, the tutorial goes into how to make interactive menus, picture buttons, chapter selection screens, subtitles, different language options, photo galleries, chapters in the movie, small movies to transition between screens, etc. The tutorial for DVD Pro is typical of the genre but the combining of DVD Pro and the projects is a great plus. Overall, I liked the book very much and would recommend it to many people I know. I would not however recommend this book to everyone. It can be very trying at many points and the urge to quit can be strong sometimes. This book is not for those who only want to 'sneak a peek' at video editing. This book is pretty serious and will be an incredible asset to those who complete even only some of the projects. I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience and would do it all over again, given the chance.