Final Fantasy and Philosophy: The Ultimate Walkthrough

Final Fantasy and Philosophy: The Ultimate Walkthrough

3.3 12
by Jason P. Blahuta, Michel S. Beaulieu, William Irwin
     
 

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An unauthorized look behind one of the greatest video game franchises of all time, Final Fantasy

The Final Fantasy universe is packed with compelling characters and incredible storylines. In this book, you'll take a fascinating look at the deeper issues that Final Fantasy forces players to think about while trying to battle their way to the

Overview

An unauthorized look behind one of the greatest video game franchises of all time, Final Fantasy

The Final Fantasy universe is packed with compelling characters and incredible storylines. In this book, you'll take a fascinating look at the deeper issues that Final Fantasy forces players to think about while trying to battle their way to the next level, such as: Does Cloud really exist (or should we really care)? Is Kefka really insane? Are Moogles part of a socialist conspiracy? Does the end of the game justify the means?

As Mages, Moogles, fiends, and Kefka are mashed together with the likes of Machiavelli, Marx, Foucault, and Kafka, you'll delve into crucial topics such as madness, nihilism, environmental ethics, Shintoism, the purpose of life, and much more.

  • Examines the philosophical issues behind one of the world's oldest and most popular video-game series
  • Offers new perspectives on Final Fantasy characters and themes
  • Gives you a psychological advantage—or at least a philosophical one—against your Final Fantasy enemies
  • Allows you to apply the wisdom of centuries of philosophy to any game in the series, including Final Fantasy XIII

Guaranteed to add a new dimension to your understanding of the Final Fantasy universe, this book is the ultimate companion to the ultimate video-game series.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470415368
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/12/2009
Series:
Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series , #12
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
611,764
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Jason P. Blahuta is an associate professor of philosophy at Lakehead University and has contributed to Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy and Terminator and Philosophy.

Michel S. Beaulieu is an assistant professor of history at Lakehead University.

William Irwin is a professor of philosophy at King's College. He originated the philosophy and popular culture genre of books as coeditor of the bestselling The Simpsons and Philosophy and has overseen recent titles including Batman and Philosophy, House and Philosophy, and Watchmen and Philosophy.

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Final Fantasy and Philosophy: The Ultimate Walkthrough 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Maikataot4 More than 1 year ago
I found this book for the most part to be an interesting read, and a reasonably good first stab at looking the phenomenon of Final Fantasy in depth. Unfortunately, the authors tend to allow their personal bias to restrict their view of the universality of the series. Of specific note is the section on the Shintoist influences in Final Fantasy VII. This Shinto influence is undeniable and extremely interesting, as are the influences of Buddhism and, possibly, Hinduism. However, the author goes out of his/her way to say that the game is somehow anti-JudeoChristian and anti-Western. For example, they claim the similarity between the name of the "Calamity", Jenova, and "Jehovah," indicates Japanese negativity towards western religious philosophy. However, the name Jenova could just as likely come from "gene" and "ova," in order to highlight the dangers of unethical genetic experimentation on sentient beings. They ignore the somewhat heavy-handed, but positively presented, Christian symbolism in "Advent Children," specifically in the use of an undeniably Christian-style church as Aerith's sanctuary, complete with stained glass and modified Chi-Rho above the altar. Cloud's cleansing of Denzel in the miraculous spring that rises there, in order to remove his illness or "geostigma," is also highly reminiscent of Christian baptism. Lastly, they claim the naming of Sephiroth (from the Judeo Kabbalistic tradition - sephirot) is indicative of "a potentially problematic syncretism." However, their interpretation of sephirot is not correct as I understand it - it has to do with achieving union with the divine God, not merely as "emanations of an Absolute God." The use of the name thus becomes understandable, as Sephiroth the character says he wishes to become a god. It is a pity the authors couldn't give the game creators more credit for inclusivity - using traditions that will be recognized by and appeal to a wide variety of cultural traditions. I believe the series' universality is one its greatest strengths, and this book doesn't do it justice.
CatnipVT More than 1 year ago
Overall, definitely an interesting read - it gets its point across, and addresses many different philosophers and their ideas in Final Fantasy terms, which is sweet. However, some of the essays were not as well-written as others; most had some sort of subjective spin on them that they failed to address, and I counted multiple typos. Other than that, pretty interesting, though. Worth a read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though I find your opinion satisfactory I hate to pint this out but could Sephiroth not be named for he fact that "sephiroth" is latin for One-winged angel? As, he has one huge wing that makes him resemble , to me at least , a fallen angel. Learn latin.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a hard book to read - hey, it's written mostly by students and grad students in philosophy. So if you're put-off by big words, don't read it. Oh, and actually, Sephiroth is not Latin. The Latin for "one-winged angel" is "alae unius Angeli". Sephiroth isn't Latin for anything.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Woah there watch the words they i couldnt understand half of what ur sayin!!!!!!!