Find Me

Find Me

3.9 58
by Rosie O'Donnell
     
 

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As she closes the door on her stunningly successful television show, Rosie O' Donnell opens her heart to the share the amazing experience that changed her life forever. Comedian. Actress. Talk-show host. Producer. Benefactor. Editorial Director. Mother. Friend.

Rosie O' Donnell has worn many hats. Now she takes a new role--as a gifted writer and the

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Overview

As she closes the door on her stunningly successful television show, Rosie O' Donnell opens her heart to the share the amazing experience that changed her life forever. Comedian. Actress. Talk-show host. Producer. Benefactor. Editorial Director. Mother. Friend.

Rosie O' Donnell has worn many hats. Now she takes a new role--as a gifted writer and the author of a surprising and powerful memoir, Find Me.

Editorial Reviews

Book Magazine
...a quick-paced memoir that reads like a novel...
Despite the tabloids' fascination with O'Donnell's sexuality, her gripping memoir only deals with the topic in passing. O'Donnell, a volunteer at an adoption agency, focuses instead on the friendship she developed last May with a young girl who contacted her after she was raped and became pregnant. Incorporating snapshots from her own life, the author writes of her attempts to help the girl and the unexpected, disturbing events that followed. O'Donnell hasn't written a juicy tell-all but a quick-paced memoir that reads like a novel.
—Kristin Kloberdanz

Publishers Weekly
One day, TV talk show host O'Donnell (Kids Are Punny), aka Rosie, impulsively left a phone message for a pregnant, 14-year-old girl, whose tragic story of rape she had learned about at the New Jersey adoption agency she funds. Within days, the girl, Stacie, called back. Rosie introduced herself and offered to help the girl in any way she could. "And as I said those words, it was like a shell breaking open or a bird coming out," writes O'Donnell. "I said hello and a crack came, and we all fell in, straight into looking-glass land." What follows is an enormously powerful story about the mystery of identity, about how forces strong enough to shatter one person can make another shine like a diamond. Rosie chronicles her increasingly obsessive phone and e-mail relationship with a poor, broken kid who comes to show her that beneath her gifts of humor, fame, money and even love, she is still the child who lost her mother and is calling out to her. But what makes this brief book extraordinary by any standard is that it captures the way a core self, a true I, can appear in the midst of the most broken life. In the kind of lean, clean, witty prose that comes only with complete honesty, Rosie imparts some unexpected truths. Readers will come away persuaded that the road of obsessiveness can sometimes lead to the palace of wisdom, that faith and grace are real. Those who declare this merely a sexual "coming-out" story (there are passing references to dating a woman and to Rosie's partner, Kelli) need a heart and brain transplant. Here, Rosie offers us an unsentimental and utterly real tale about the power of love. (One-day laydown, Apr. 16) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
O'Donnell's life is the stuff of legend. She grew up in a poor household, and at the age of 11 she lost her mom to breast cancer. From that background she became a comic, an actress, an award-winning talk show host, and an activist for children's rights. But behind the success was a woman suffering with depression and her need to be perfect. The author parallels this memoir with her experience with a woman with multiple personalities who comes into her life. The book moves between O'Donnell's interactions with the young woman and her own story, including her decision to leave her talk show and become more public about her private life with her longtime lover. This work is extremely disjointed and can be quite confusing; the listener sometimes has trouble keeping track of whether O'Donnell is talking about her life or "Stacie," one of the multiple personalities. After hearing her tale, instead of wanting to cheer, listeners may wonder if O'Donnell is in need of mental health support as well. Given her problems with her magazine and other events that are keeping her in the news, libraries may want to purchase this tape for demand. Otherwise, not a necessary purchase.-Danna Bell-Russel, Library of Congress Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786243846
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Series:
Biography Ser.
Edition description:
LARGEPRINT
Pages:
222
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 8.86(h) x 0.81(d)

Read an Excerpt

I met Stacie for the first time in May. Her voice was meek and flat on the phone. She wasn't crying, but I heard it, the unmistakable sound of desperation. That was the first call, the single call that would change my life, and hers too, probably forever.

I work with a nonprofit adoption agency in New Jersey. I fund their operation and provide outreach services; they do the work. Finding families for kids who need them is beyond fulfilling, it is addictive. I like to help. I need to help. I help a lot, sometimes too much.

This is a true story about a girl named Stacie who called the adoption agency with a terrible problem. A lot of it won't make sense, at least logically. But sometimes sense runs deeper than logic. Nothing happens by chance. The events that follow, some dark and painful, changed me absolutely.

You have been warned.

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