Finders and Keepers: Helping New Teachers Survive and Thrive in Our Schools

Overview

"This important and much-needed book is based on a longitudinal study of fifty new teachers during their first years in the classroom. It highlights the cases of ten, whose stories vividly illustrate the joys and disappointments of new teachers in today's schools. The book documents why they entered teaching, what they encountered in their schools, and how they decided whether to stay or move on to other schools or other lines of work. By tracking these teachers' eventual career decisions, Finders and Keepers reveals what really matters to new
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Overview

"This important and much-needed book is based on a longitudinal study of fifty new teachers during their first years in the classroom. It highlights the cases of ten, whose stories vividly illustrate the joys and disappointments of new teachers in today's schools. The book documents why they entered teaching, what they encountered in their schools, and how they decided whether to stay or move on to other schools or other lines of work. By tracking these teachers' eventual career decisions, Finders and Keepers reveals what really matters to new teachers as they set out to educate their students. The book uncovers the importance of the school site and the crucial role that principals and experienced teachers play in the effective hiring and induction of the next generation of teachers." Staffing the nation's schools presents both challenges and opportunities. For teacher educators, district administrators, educational policymakers, teachers, principals, and staff development professionals, Finders and Keepers provides valuable insights about how to better serve new teachers and the students they teach.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
"Between 2000 and 2010, one half of the public school teachers in the United States will retire. At the same time, student enrollments continue to grow and attrition rates among new teachers soar." Who will become the next generation of teachers? How can they be effectively recruited to schools that need them? What can we do to keep them in the profession? These are the central questions behind this fascinating study by Johnson (Harvard Graduate Sch. of Education) and her colleagues in the Project on the Next Generation of Teachers. Drawing extensively on a long-term qualitative study of 50 teachers who entered the profession in the late 1990s and focusing on the experiences of ten of them, the authors identify a number of issues that keep our schools both from finding and from keeping talented new teachers. With substantive discussions of issues such as educational leadership, peer mentoring, hiring practices, and effective means of professional induction, Johnson and her coauthors outline the challenges facing new teachers in today's schools and suggest numerous ways in which teachers, administrators, and policymakers can work together to improve the experience of new teachers and to help assure that there is a next generation of professionals in our schools. Recommended for all collections.-Scott Walter, Washington State Univ. Lib., Pullman Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780787987640
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 3/23/2007
  • Series: The Jossey-Bass Education Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 1,415,273
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Moore Johnson, a former high school teacher and administrator, is the Pforzheimer Professor of Teaching and Learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where from 1993 to 1999 she served as academic dean. Johnson is a member of the National Academy of Education and director of The Project on the Next Generation of Teachers. She is the author of numerous articles and several books, including Teacher Unions in Schools (Temple University Press), Teachers at Work (Basic Books), and Leading to Change (Jossey-Bass).
Sarah E. Birkeland, Morgaen L. Donaldson, Susan M. Kardos, David Kauffman, Edward Liu, and Heather G. Peske are all are former teachers, advanced doctoral students, and published researchers at The Project on the Next Generation of Teachers at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Table of Contents

List of Tables, Figures, and Exhibits
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors
1 Greater Expectation, Higher Demands 1
2 The Next Generation of Teachers 19
3 What Teaching Pays, What Teaching Costs 49
4 Seeking Success with Students 69
5 Schools that Support New Teachers 91
6 Filling the Curriculum Void 119
7 Professional Culture and the Promise of Colleagues 139
8 Making Better Matches in Hiring 167
9 Supporting New Teachers Through School-Based Induction 193
10 Sustaining New Teachers Through Professional Growth 225
11 Finders and Keepers 249
Epilogue 273
Notes 275
App. A: Background and Methods 279
App. B: Interview Protocols 287
References 299
Index 309
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2005

    Good Teachers

    Susan Johnson does a good job of providing information that is important for new teachers as well as for current teachers to know. Three main ideas or issues that she goes over in this book in which I believe are essential for all teachers are the following: what schools expect of their teachers, how much an average teacher gets paid, and also how schools themselves can keep ahold of good teachers and not lose them to other schools or even to an entirely different profession. I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone specifically those who are thinking of becoming teachers, those who are already teachers and any one involved in a school.

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