Finding, Framing, and Hanging Jefferson: A Lost Letter, a Remarkable Discovery, and Freedom of Speech in an Age of Terrorism

Overview

The #1 New York Times bestselling author, Harvard Law School professor, and tireless defender of civil liberties unearths a little-known letter by his hero, Thomas Jefferson, and shares its secrets. The letter illuminates Jefferson’s views on freedom of speech in a way that has important implications for the country today, particularly in the struggle against terrorism. This book is about the remarkable letter Dershowitz found, how he found it, and why it matters not only to ...

See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$14.99
BN.com price
(Save 6%)$15.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $1.99   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Finding, Framing, and Hanging Jefferson: A Lost Letter, a Remarkable Discovery, and Freedom of Speech in an Age of Terrorism

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$19.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$34.95 List Price

Overview

The #1 New York Times bestselling author, Harvard Law School professor, and tireless defender of civil liberties unearths a little-known letter by his hero, Thomas Jefferson, and shares its secrets. The letter illuminates Jefferson’s views on freedom of speech in a way that has important implications for the country today, particularly in the struggle against terrorism. This book is about the remarkable letter Dershowitz found, how he found it, and why it matters not only to him, but to us today.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Karen J. Greenberg
Finding Jefferson is a thoughtful reflection on the "threat posed by Imams who preach violence" and whether we should make it illegal for such people "to continue to preach their hatred."
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

Contemplating whether the government could censor imams whose preaching might incite terrorism, Harvard law professor Dershowitz (Blasphemy) wondered what Thomas Jefferson would say about "where to draw the appropriate line, between dangerous speech and harmful conduct." Dershowitz found an answer in New York's Argosy Bookstore, where he stumbled over a letter written by Jefferson on July 3, 1801, addressing the limits of free speech, especially religious and political speech. Based in part on his reading of Jefferson, Dershowitz concludes that we ought not to censor the speech of even the most violent religious leaders. Echoing Jefferson, he says that liberty is dangerous and adds that in any case censorship would not prevent either violence or incitement to it. This book is not without its annoyances: it opens with a self-indulgent tour through the many objects Dershowitz likes to collect, from baseball paraphernalia to the odd picture of Abraham Lincoln, and the bulk of Dershowitz's ruminations are cast in a long letter to Jefferson-a distracting device. These meditations from one of our most provocative constitutional scholars may not evoke as much controversy as have his earlier suggestions that there be warrants for interrogators to use torture in limited circumstances, but the main contribution here is the publication of Jefferson's letter. Photos. (Nov.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

A remarkable discovery leading to a remarkable book. As indicated by the subtitle, Dershowitz (Harvard Law Sch.; The Case for Israel) serendipitously located and then purchased a lengthy statement by Thomas Jefferson touching upon freedom of speech. The statement is not only notable for its contribution to our understanding of this eminent American's thoughts on the subject, as well as those of the Founding Fathers in drawing the original constitutional limitations on expressive speech and actions, but is of vital importance in illuminating current debate on the subject of terrorism and the right to express unpopular opinions and politics. Entrusted to a scholar of note and a prolific writer not fearful of engaging in cutting-edge arguments, the letter leads to a fascinating exchange of views that will provide signal assistance to anyone vitally interested in politics, civil liberties, and constitutional rights. In addition, the author engages in a lively recitation of his lifelong passion for collecting rarities and treasures, which many share. Given its clear explanation of the debate surrounding the right to speak out, as well as its genuinely amusing elements, this book should be made available to a wide-ranging readership in all general libraries.
—Gilles Renaud

From the Publisher
* Contemplating whether the government could censor imams whose preaching might incite terrorism, Harvard law professor Dershowitz (Blasphemy) wondered what Thomas Jefferson would say about "where to draw the appropriate line, between dangerous speech and harmful conduct." Dershowitz found an answer in New York's Argosy Bookstore, where he stumbled over a letter written by Jefferson on July 3, 1801, addressing the limits of free speech, especially religious and political speech. Based in part on his reading of Jefferson, Dershowitz concludes that we ought not to censor the speech of even the most violent religious leaders. Echoing Jefferson, he says that liberty is dangerous and adds that in any case censorship would not prevent either violence or incitement to it. This book is not without its annoyances: it opens with a self-indulgent tour through the many objects Dershowitz likes to collect, from baseball paraphernalia to the odd picture of Abraham Lincoln, and the bulk of Dershowitz's ruminations are cast in a long letter to Jefferson—a distracting device. These meditations from one of our most provocative constitutional scholars may not evoke as much controversy as have his earlier suggestions that there be warrants for interrogators to use torture in limited circumstances, but the main contribution here is the publication of Jefferson's letter. Photos. (Nov.) (Publishers Weekly, September 3, 2007)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470450437
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 4/27/2009
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Alan Dershowitz, the Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, is one of the country's foremost appellate lawyers and a distinguished defender of individual liberties. His many books include the #1 New York Times bestsellers Chutzpah and The Case for Israel. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

PART I THE COLLECTOR AND HIS PASSIONS.

1 My Passion for Collecting.

2 My Passions for Freedom of Speech, Criminal Law, and Thomas Jefferson.

PART II THE LETTER.

3 Finding the Jefferson Letter.

4 The Provenance of the Jefferson-Boardman Letter.

PART III MY LETTER TO JEFFERSON.

5 Where We Have Come since 1826.

6 Jefferson’s First Argument: An Expressed Opinion Can Never Constitute an Overt Act.

7 Jefferson’s Second Argument: If Conscience Will Govern.

8 Jefferson’s Third Argument: "We Have Nothing to Fear from the Demoralizing Reasonings of Some, if Others Are Left Free to Demonstrate Their Errors".

9 Jefferson’s Fourth Argument: "The Law Stands Ready to Punish the First Criminal Act Produced by the False Reasoning".

10 Jefferson’s Fifth Argument: "These Are Safer Correctives than the Conscience of a Judge".

PART IV WHAT WOULD JEFFERSON SAY ABOUT TERRORISM AND FREEDOM OF SPEECH TODAY?

11 Jefferson’s Views on the "Terrorism" of His Era.

12 Jefferson’s Actions in the Burr Case.

13 Jefferson’s Views on Torture, Habeas Corpus, and Other Issues Currently Debated in the Context of Terrorism.

14 How Would Jefferson Strike the Balance between Freedom of Speech and Prevention of Terrorism.

15 My View, as Influenced by Jefferson and the Experiences of Our Time.

Appendix A A Transcript of the Jefferson Letter and Letterpress Copy.

Appendix B Excerpted from "Discourse: Truth Its Own Test and God Its Only Judge".

Notes.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2008

    Distorting Jefferson's Religious Belief

    I have read 'FINDING JEFFERSON' and have found it well written and interesting. However, Dershowitz states on page 53 that Jefferson's 'god was the god of nature rather than the god of the bible.' I agree with Jefferson's view of god as I know of Jefferson's god, and I find Dershowitz's statement to be incorrect. As support of my viewpoint, I refer the reader to: 'THE JEFFERSON BIBLE, The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth,' Beacon Press, Boston, 1989, preface by Forrest Church. In a letter to Dr. Benjamin Rush, Jefferson described his thoughts as, â¿¿the result of a life of inquiry and reflection, and very different from the anti-Christian system imputed to me by those who know nothing of my opinions. To the corruptions of Christianity, I am indeed opposed: but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself.'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)