Finding Grace: The Face of America's Homeless

Overview

An amateur photographer from the age of 10, Lynn Blodgett studied under Andrew Eccles, a renowned photographer who was selected by The New York Times to shoot the cover of their millennium issue. Blodgett is also a businessman with a social conscience who travels the country as head of the nation’s largest provider of computer-based services to state and local governments. He does extensive fundraising across the country, with the funds going to benefit local homeless shelters and projects. During his travels ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$42.21
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$55.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $23.59   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

An amateur photographer from the age of 10, Lynn Blodgett studied under Andrew Eccles, a renowned photographer who was selected by The New York Times to shoot the cover of their millennium issue. Blodgett is also a businessman with a social conscience who travels the country as head of the nation’s largest provider of computer-based services to state and local governments. He does extensive fundraising across the country, with the funds going to benefit local homeless shelters and projects. During his travels over the last few years, he began keeping a photographic journal of the homeless people he met, along with their stories, in every city he visited. The result is this powerful collection of words and images that show how people who go through life ignored and reviled manage to endure, often with grace and humanity, the grimmest of life’s circumstances.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

This book evolved out of a class assignment in a photography workshop that Blodgett took with Andrew Eccles, a nationally prominent photographer. Blodgett has been taking pictures since the age of ten, and while making a living in corporate America, he pursued his passion for photography on weekends and in workshops. Eccles has continued to advise Blodgett in his art and has witnessed his evolution into "a remarkable photographer." This book of 140 black-and-white photographs is the culmination of a year's picture taking across America of the homeless, a group of society that many of us do not choose to see or interact with. In these photographs, we see the faces of men, women, and children who are the homeless; the overused axiom of one picture equals a thousand words has never been a more accurate statement. These photographs capture the people and the stories behind the faces. A powerful and impactful book; recommended for all libraries.
—Karen MacMurray

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781601091055
  • Publisher: Insight Editions LLC
  • Publication date: 8/28/2007
  • Pages: 124
  • Sales rank: 1,059,895
  • Product dimensions: 10.40 (w) x 13.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2008

    A touching portrait of humanity

    I was very disheartened to read the previous review written on this site. I watched a CBS documentary on Lynn Blodgett and was overcome with admiration for him. I and my family are a simple middle class family, no where near the wealth of this man. However, instead of spending his time at country clubs or flying a private jet around the world, he has chosen to use his talents to bring awareness to The Homeless. His efforts have raised millions of dollars for the cause. The book is beautiful and to the the average person, a work of art. I would hope more people would follow this man's lead.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2008

    A reviewer

    There is no doubt that Lynn Blodgett is able to take a good picture: but that doesn¿t necessarily mean that he takes great photographs. Artistry in photography is not defined by the intent or purpose of the photographer, but by an intrinsic quality ¿ as is in all art -- that excites, transforms and touches the viewer. Excellence in photography may just be when the intent is executed. Although compared to Richard Avedon, Blodgett has not in any sense produced images as remarkable, or original. He may have copied Avedon¿s technique with the use of the white backdrop, but that¿s as close as he could be said to capturing that unique vision. Unlike Avedon¿s art, the lack of context in Blodgett¿s images requires the need for an explanation of the content to the viewer. This ruins the point of the image. Consider Avedon¿s classic `The Family (a work in progress)¿, published in 1976 in Rolling Stone. The images stand alone, in his signature stark contrast, and the viewer needs no words to explain them. The point is that photography is a visual medium and words are irrelevant. There is no indication that these pictures in any way give the impression that they are homeless first. More powerful and moving ¿ indeed artistic - portraits that illustrate this are works produced by Walker Evans and Dorothea Lang and offer a far better ¿ and photographic ¿ expression of transcendent grace. Mr. Blodgett claims to have taken two to three thousand pictures of people. Certainly, with quantity there will always be some quality. And practice and education will produce technically flawless pictures. But there is something intrinsically wrong with a man that shows up on the street with designer clothes, a 30K Hasselblad and a fist full of ten-dollar bills to take pictures of homeless people. A much more interesting photograph that would illustrate the plight of the homeless would have been one showing this man with his dollars, clothes, camera, and the line of people with hands extended waiting for their share. This image would have needed no explanation. A cynical mind could observe that a privileged Blodgett approaches photography with the same laissez faire with which he pursues falconry.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)