Finding Noel

( 37 )

Overview

A heartwarming and inspirational Christmas novel in the tradition of The Christmas Box, Grace, The Gift, and The Christmas List. The New York Times bestselling author of The Christmas Box and The Walk series returns with a holiday novel of hope, love, and redemption.

A young woman, who has been adopted as a child by a loving family, has only a Christmas ornament inscribed with the word “Noel” as a keepsake of her birth family, about whom she remembers nothing. When long hidden ...

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Finding Noel: A Novel

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Overview

A heartwarming and inspirational Christmas novel in the tradition of The Christmas Box, Grace, The Gift, and The Christmas List. The New York Times bestselling author of The Christmas Box and The Walk series returns with a holiday novel of hope, love, and redemption.

A young woman, who has been adopted as a child by a loving family, has only a Christmas ornament inscribed with the word “Noel” as a keepsake of her birth family, about whom she remembers nothing. When long hidden memories resurface, she begins an emotionally challenging personal journey as she searches for her biological sister and clues about her mysterious past...

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
On the night that Mark Smart has decided will be his last, his car dies in a blizzard. He enters a closing coffee shop and finds Macy Wood, who literally offers him a shoulder to cry on. The two forge a deep friendship, and after three weeks, Mark proposes marriage. She declines, but waitress Joette, who has taken care of Macy since she was 13, orchestrates a reunion as Mark tries to smooth over the rifts dividing what remains of his family. Mark's stepfather's advice "sometimes it's the fight that makes a thing worth having" serves as the defining aphorism of Evans's yuletide offering. (Oct.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Best-selling author Evans (The Christmas Box) returns with another tale of faith and hope for the holiday season. Mark's life is falling apart he is falsely accused of theft, struggles with depression, and is distraught over the unexpected death of his mother. Then he meets Macy, a young woman with her own share of troubles, including an emotionally abusive foster family. Together, they overcome their problems and go on a quest to find Macy's long-lost sister, Noel. The story jumps from flashbacks of Macy's past to Mark's journal entries, which results in a trying, disjointed read. However, Evans's past success makes this appropriate for most collections, particularly where inspirational fiction is popular. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 6/15/06.] Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743287036
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 10/3/2006
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 325,753
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Paul Evans

Richard Paul Evans is the #1 bestselling author of The Christmas Box. Each of his more than twenty novels has been a New York Times bestseller. There are more than 17 million copies of his books in print worldwide, translated into more than twenty-four languages. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the American Mothers Book Award, the Romantic Times Best Women’s Novel of the Year Award, the German Audience Gold Award for Romance, three Religion Communicators Council Wilbur Awards, the Washington Times Humanitarian of the Century Award, and the Volunteers of America National Empathy Award. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, with his wife, Keri, and their five children. You can learn more about Richard on Facebook.com/RPEFans, or visit his website RichardPaulEvans.com.

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    1. Hometown:
      Salt Lake City, Utah
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 11, 1962
    2. Place of Birth:
      Salt Lake City, Utah
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Utah, 1984

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Begin at the start, end at the end.

It's the best advice I could give a friend.

* SONG LYRICS FROM MARK SMART'S DIARY *

When I was a boy, my mother told me that everyone comes into our lives for a reason. I'm not sure if I believe that's true. The thought of God weaving millions of lives together into a grand human tapestry seems a bit fatalistic to me. Still, as I look back at my life, there seem to be times when such divinity is apparent. None is more obvious to me than that winter evening when I met a beautiful young woman named Macy and there ensued the extraordinary chain of events that encounter set in place.

Of course such a theory carried to the extreme would mean that God sabotaged my car that night because, had my car's timing belt not broken at that precise moment, this story never would have happened. But it did, and my life was forever changed. Perhaps my mother was right. If God can align the planets, maybe He can do the same to our lives.

My story began at a time when it was dangerously close to ending -- a wintry November evening, eleven days after my mother died. My mother was killed in a car accident. There were three other people with her in the car, and everyone but my mother walked away unharmed. I was close to my mother, and the day I learned she died was the worst day of my life.

Even before her death my life was in shambles. I had left my home in Huntsville, Alabama, nine months earlier and come to Salt Lake City to attend the University of Utah on an engineering scholarship. I had never been out West, and all I knew of Utah (other than that it had the only out-of-state school willing to give me a scholarship) was that it was a long way from Huntsville, with a few mountain ranges in between. This suited me because I wanted to put as many miles between my father and me as I could.

Actually, I never really called Stuart Smart "Father." He had always been "Stu" to me, and I considered his full name an oxymoron. He was an auto mechanic with an eighth-grade education, grease under his fingernails, and a disdain for all things he didn't understand -- which included English grammar and me.

His dream was for me to one day take over the family business -- Smart Auto Repair -- and every Saturday after I turned ten, he'd drag me down to the garage and put me to work. While my friends were hanging around the Tastee-Freez or hunting grasshoppers with BB guns, I spent my childhood changing tires and air filters.

I hated everything about the garage; from the boredom of watching Stu dissect a transmission to eating bologna and mustard sandwiches on bread smudged with motor oil. But most of all I didn't like being with Stu. He wasn't one for idle conversation, so the long days were mostly silent except for the occasional whine of a pneumatic wrench and the constant twang of a country radio station. I wasn't much good as a mechanic and Stu always seemed annoyed with my ineptness. Every week I begged my mother to not make me go, and one Saturday, around the time I turned fourteen, Stu finally gave up on me and left me home.

If love isn't blind it's at least horribly nearsighted.

-- Mark Smart's Diary

My mother, Alice Geniel Phelps, was nothing like Stu. She was soft, well spoken and thoughtful. She liked to read and talk about philosophy, music and literature, things my father generally considered a waste of time. I could never figure out why someone like my mother married a guy like Stu until I came across a copy of my parents' wedding announcement. To my surprise I learned that they'd been married just eight weeks before I was born. I figured that with the way things were back then, she had to.

As I got older, Stu and I argued a lot. I couldn't tell you how many times my mother interceded on my behalf, sometimes standing between the two of us. My mother was the skin that held our home together. Now she was gone. And so was my home.

As I said, things were already going badly. Though I worked hard and earned straight A's, after my first year in school, the university announced a budgetary cutback and dropped hundreds of scholarships. Mine included. Since I was no longer in school, I lost my job at the university registrar's office and my room in the dorm.

In truth, I didn't care that much about engineering -- I had no real love for it -- but my parents couldn't afford tuition and the scholarship was my only way into college. My real dream was to be a songwriter. But music scholarships are hard to come by unless you're a classical virtuoso, which I'm not. I play the twelve-string guitar alright. I guess I'm more of a folksinger, not exactly Juilliard material.

Stu had predicted my failure and I wasn't about to give him the satisfaction of making him right, so I stayed in Utah and wrote cheerful, fraudulent letters home, telling everyone that school was going well. The truth was I was lonely, poor and depressed, living in a rundown basement apartment and employed at the only job I could find -- on the janitorial crew at a nearby high school.

My plan was to save up enough money to get back into school, but I was barely making enough to get by. The day my mother died, my aunt called the dorm to tell me. That's when my family learned I was no longer in school. Since I had left no forwarding address or phone number, I didn't find out about my mother's death until two days after her funeral when I called home to talk to her. Stu answered the phone. He called me a liar and told me not to bother to come home.

I thought I'd hit bottom, but apparently there was still more room to fall. Later that same week Tennys, my girlfriend back in Alabama, whom I had dated for nearly four years, sent me a letter informing me of her recent engagement to a promising young chiropractor.

I'm ashamed of what happened next. I now believe that under the right circumstances we are all capable of things we'd never think possible.

In the last year I had struggled with depression. But now, with the added grief, loneliness and rejection, I began having thoughts of ending my life. At first it was no more than an errant spark, quickly extinguished. But as my depression deepened, the idea began to take root.

The night this story begins I had arrived at work only to be yelled at by a crazy English teacher who accused me of stealing a classroom CD player. I knew nothing of the player, had never even noticed it, but she insisted that I was the only one with access to her room and she swore I'd be fired and reported to the police if I didn't return it by the next day. Later that evening, as I cleaned toilets, I decided this would be my last night of pain. That was where my mind was when my car broke down on the way home from work. God kicking me one last time, I thought. The truth was He had other plans.

My mother used to say, "Man's extremities are God's opportunities." She also used to say, "Be kind to everyone -- you don't know what cross they're bearing and how sweet that kind word might ring." That night proved both pieces of wisdom true.

That night was the start of a journey that taught me that one truth can change everything. It was the night I found Macy. And it was the Christmas season that Macy found Noel.

Copyright © 2006 by Richard Paul Evans

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Introduction

Finding Noel

Richard Paul Evans

Synopsis

"When I was young, my mother told me that everyone comes into our lives for a reason."

On a snowy November evening in Salt Lake City, Mark Smart, sitting in a broken down car, has hit rock bottom. He's lost his college scholarship, been dumped by his girlfriend back home, and most shattering of all, just learned of his mother's sudden death. But at the moment that he feels most hopeless, he meets Macy Wood, a kind and lovely stranger who is haunted by tragedies of her own.

Mark grows closer to Macy, learning the sad details of her past — a neglectful father, an abusive adoptive family, and a lost sister, Noel. Guided by the message on an old glass ornament, Macy begins a journey to reconnect with her sister. As Mark helps Macy's search, he examines his own life, finding love, forgiveness, and the true meanings of family and Christmas.

Reading Guide

1. Finding Noel opens with an opinion, the narrator questioning an inspirational thought. Does this immediately create an impression of the narrator? Does Mark's skepticism make him more human and accessible? How does his questioning help draw you into his story?

2. In Mark's first encounter with Macy, she says, "We always tell our deepest secrets to strangers." (Pg. 12) Do you agree with her reasoning for this? How does Mark's initial honesty create a foundation for his relationship with Macy? In what ways does this contrast with the other relationships in his life? Why do you think Mark believes people will use his secrets against him?

3. In Finding Noel, many first encounters are described using specific physicaldescriptions of people or places. How do these details inform your first impressions of characters? Compare some of the setting descriptions, such as the Hummel household (pg. 28), Jolene's apartment (pg. 51), and the Thorup home (pg. 97). How do the settings reflect their inhabitants? In what ways are they deceptive?

4. Mark's past is summarized quickly in the first few pages of Finding Noel, whereas Macy's unfolds in pieces as the story progresses. Does your sympathy for Mark evolve as you learn about Macy? Does the difference in narrative pace indicate differences in the two characters' perspectives? How does Macy's reaction to her father contrast with Mark's resentment?

5. Does the revelation of his childhood battle with polio alter your opinion of Macy's father? Does this excuse his abandonment of his daughters to any degree? He says that "the greatest hurts of our lives come from running from the smaller hurts." In what way does this statement pertain to Mark's situation at the beginning of the book? How does his revelation help to set up Mark's father's later revelation?

6. When Mark and Joette spend time together on Thanksgiving, she compares parenting to The Wizard of Oz. How does this discussion affect Mark's outlook when he returns to Alabama?

7. Why did Macy react so negatively to Mark's proposal? Was it inappropriate for him to propose after so short a time? Was Macy's anger at Mark's running from his past justified, or was it an easy defense mechanism? How could Macy's past affect her present relationships?

8. How does Tennys's personality contrast with Macy's? What do you think Mark got out of his relationship with Tennys? Mark describes Tennys as a "sure thing." What makes her less of a challenge than Macy? How have Mark's strong emotions for Macy complicated his relationship with her, in addition to validating it? What sort of life do you imagine Mark would have with Tennys?

9. Finding Noel depicts very different examples of families and homes. What, ultimately, is the meaning of home? Was the Hummel household ever home to Macy? What makes Mark feel finally at home in Alabama? Do Macy and Mark need to find their own senses of family before they can form one together?

10. In Macy's Christmas poem (pg. 73), she describes the responsibility of Christmas as being "called, to leave our troubled lives of care,/To set aside our burdened minds, with God and man our hearts to share." In what ways is the gift of Christmas also a responsibility? How does Mark step up to the challenge in this novel? In what ways is this a Christmas story?

Reading Group Tips

Is it near the holidays? Why not have a crafts day and make holiday ornaments together? For do-it-yourself ideas, visit this website: http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/dc_occasions_december/0,1792,HGTV_3472,00.htmlTo make it more personal, you could include a message to someone special, just like in Finding Noel.

Visit www.richardpaulevans.com, where he discusses the inspiration for his books, and keeps us updated on upcoming novels.

Have a discussion about fate. Do you believe in it? Have fun sharing stories about times you feel that someone has come into your life for a reason.

RICHARD PAUL EVANS is the #1 best-selling author of The Christmas Box. His fourteen novels have each appeared on the New York Times bestseller list; there are more than thirteen million copies of his books in print. His books have been translated into more than 22 languages and several have been international best sellers. He is the winner of the 1998 American Mothers Book Award, two first place Storytelling World Awards for his children's books, and the 2005 Romantic Times Best Women Novel of the Year Award.  Evans received the Washington Times Humanitarian of the Century Award and the Volunteers of America National Empathy Award for his work helping abused children.  He is the founder and CEO of BookWise, an international direct sales business. Evans lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, with his wife, Keri, and their five children.

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Reading Group Guide


Finding Noel

Richard Paul Evans

Synopsis

"When I was young, my mother told me that everyone comes into our lives for a reason."

On a snowy November evening in Salt Lake City, Mark Smart, sitting in a broken down car, has hit rock bottom. He's lost his college scholarship, been dumped by his girlfriend back home, and most shattering of all, just learned of his mother's sudden death. But at the moment that he feels most hopeless, he meets Macy Wood, a kind and lovely stranger who is haunted by tragedies of her own.

Mark grows closer to Macy, learning the sad details of her past -- a neglectful father, an abusive adoptive family, and a lost sister, Noel. Guided by the message on an old glass ornament, Macy begins a journey to reconnect with her sister. As Mark helps Macy's search, he examines his own life, finding love, forgiveness, and the true meanings of family and Christmas.

Reading Guide

1. Finding Noel opens with an opinion, the narrator questioning an inspirational thought. Does this immediately create an impression of the narrator? Does Mark's skepticism make him more human and accessible? How does his questioning help draw you into his story?

2. In Mark's first encounter with Macy, she says, "We always tell our deepest secrets to strangers." (Pg. 12) Do you agree with her reasoning for this? How does Mark's initial honesty create a foundation for his relationship with Macy? In what ways does this contrast with the other relationships in his life? Why do you think Mark believes people will use his secrets against him?

3. In Finding Noel, many first encounters are described using specific physical descriptions of people or places. How do these details inform your first impressions of characters? Compare some of the setting descriptions, such as the Hummel household (pg. 28), Jolene's apartment (pg. 51), and the Thorup home (pg. 97). How do the settings reflect their inhabitants? In what ways are they deceptive?

4. Mark's past is summarized quickly in the first few pages of Finding Noel, whereas Macy's unfolds in pieces as the story progresses. Does your sympathy for Mark evolve as you learn about Macy? Does the difference in narrative pace indicate differences in the two characters' perspectives? How does Macy's reaction to her father contrast with Mark's resentment?

5. Does the revelation of his childhood battle with polio alter your opinion of Macy's father? Does this excuse his abandonment of his daughters to any degree? He says that "the greatest hurts of our lives come from running from the smaller hurts." In what way does this statement pertain to Mark's situation at the beginning of the book? How does his revelation help to set up Mark's father's later revelation?

6. When Mark and Joette spend time together on Thanksgiving, she compares parenting to The Wizard of Oz. How does this discussion affect Mark's outlook when he returns to Alabama?

7. Why did Macy react so negatively to Mark's proposal? Was it inappropriate for him to propose after so short a time? Was Macy's anger at Mark's running from his past justified, or was it an easy defense mechanism? How could Macy's past affect her present relationships?

8. How does Tennys's personality contrast with Macy's? What do you think Mark got out of his relationship with Tennys? Mark describes Tennys as a "sure thing." What makes her less of a challenge than Macy? How have Mark's strong emotions for Macy complicated his relationship with her, in addition to validating it? What sort of life do you imagine Mark would have with Tennys?

9. Finding Noel depicts very different examples of families and homes. What, ultimately, is the meaning of home? Was the Hummel household ever home to Macy? What makes Mark feel finally at home in Alabama? Do Macy and Mark need to find their own senses of family before they can form one together?

10. In Macy's Christmas poem (pg. 73), she describes the responsibility of Christmas as being "called, to leave our troubled lives of care,/To set aside our burdened minds, with God and man our hearts to share." In what ways is the gift of Christmas also a responsibility? How does Mark step up to the challenge in this novel? In what ways is this a Christmas story?

Reading Group Tips

Is it near the holidays? Why not have a crafts day and make holiday ornaments together? For do-it-yourself ideas, visit this website: http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/dc_occasions_december/0,1792,HGTV_3472,00.html To make it more personal, you could include a message to someone special, just like in Finding Noel.

Visit www.richardpaulevans.com, where he discusses the inspiration for his books, and keeps us updated on upcoming novels.

Have a discussion about fate. Do you believe in it? Have fun sharing stories about times you feel that someone has come into your life for a reason. Simon & Schuster

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2013

    Great

    When I read this book I cried! Not many books make me cry!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent Read!!!

    A great story teller – Evans always brings a novel to life. As the Christmas season approaches Mark has to drop out of college due to finances and has just learned his mother has died and on one snowy night in November when he car dies, he stumbles upon a girl Macy who has had a horrible childhood and living with a lady who took her in. She has little memory of her birth parents and a horrible adopted family. Her one hope is to find her sister “Noel” as they were separated when they were children and kept apart by the system. Macy and Mark are meant for each other and fate has something in motion, as when one door closes, God places someone there for you. An amazing story – loved it!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 17, 2012

    It was a good book until the end when her sister showed up. The

    It was a good book until the end when her sister showed up. The reason she gave for showing up felt like a stretch. What mormon princess digs through garbage? She was supposed to be away at A.S.?
    $14.99 for a several year old, less than 200 page nook book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Live

    Live

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  • Posted April 24, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    This is an inspiring book packed full of emotion. I couldn't put

    This is an inspiring book packed full of emotion. I couldn't put it down!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    Great read

    This was a very good book but all his books are great. I have read all his books

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  • Posted August 27, 2011

    Great!

    I love all his little books!! I love that they make me smile and they make me cry and they make me fall in love all over again. Great book, you woun't be disappointed.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Nice Holiday Story

    It;s stories like this that bring us closer together during the holidays.
    Stories like this are what give holidays their importance.

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  • Posted January 9, 2010

    Another Riveting Novel by the Captivating Richard Paul Evans

    Richard Paul Evans has done it again. He has a way of capturing your heart with his characters. His novels leave you waiting for his next piece of craftmenship. Well done.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2009

    Touching as always

    As with all of Richard Paul Evans' books, this one is a quick light but totally inspiring read. I would highly recommend this for anyone who wants to read a well written inspiring tale.

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  • Posted July 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Another Gem

    This is a touching hankie grabber, (again), from Mr. Evans. This is a story of a man and woman, both who grew up with sad childhoods, how they meet, and resolve those old issues, with a tearful but well-resolved conclusion. Typical Richard, so if you like a little romance, a book with morals and a little crying in there somewhere, this is a perfect little read. And I do mean little. Done in an hour or two, but oh, so worth it. Good, as well, for a little stocking stuffer at Christmas, and also good to read in front of the Christmas tree, on a rainy or snowy dusky afternoon with a hot cup of chocolate! And a tissue.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2008

    The Very Best

    I am a very slow reader, and I lose interest quickly if the book doesn't get my attention within the first few pages. Richard Paul Evans has had the ability, in all his works, to hold my interest with his beautiful stories, descriptions, and mix of sadness and humor. However, by far, this book is my favorite. I don't know when I've cried so hard one minute, and laughed so hard the next minute while reading ANY book. In my opinion, you have missed something very special if you do not read this story. Thank you, Mr. Evans for touching every part of my soul.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2007

    Love finds a way

    This is a story about what the adoption/foster care system can do and does to children. BUT it is also a story about the resilience of children and how they cope as they grow up. Mark Smart is at the lowest point in his life when car failure and a snowy night bring him into a diner and Macy Woods into his life. Macy changes Mark¿s depression into a willingness to go on and the two begin a relationship. Mark discovers that Macy is known as Mary at the diner where she works. He wonders why and discovers that her life was not all roses as a child. A Christmas ornament with Noel is all Macy has left of her birth family. She was adopted by parents that didn¿t really want her, she was separated from her sister who was sent to another set of adoptive parents and when she tries to find her now that she is an adult, discovers that the adoption is sealed. Macy is now living with a woman who is loving and kind but has a secret of her own. Mark¿s own life has had its own turmoil. He was in college in Utah but had to drop out for lack of money. He started to work to put money aside so he could return but during this time his mother died and his family in Alabama wasn¿t able to find him until 2 days after the funeral. Mark and his father didn¿t get along very well and he doesn¿t want to have any contact with him. Mark and Macy each help the other to come to terms with their pasts so they can move forward with the present. It is a story that you will want to read from beginning to end without stopping.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2006

    A Great Find

    Another heart-touching story from Evans. His characters are good but it's his story line that keeps you conneted to this new novel. The serendipty and struggles in Mark's life will resonate with readers and provide hope, not to mention a lot to dwell upon.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Truly Inspiring...

    I read this book in no time at all. It is an absolute page-turner and is filled with memorable characters and inspiring words. I was wrapped up in the story immediately. I think just about anyone could relate to this novel on some level. Highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2006

    WONDERFUL BOOK, GREAT WRITING

    Having read this book in one sitting, you can see that it just held me captive from the beginning to the very end. Richard Paul Evans has another winner -- don't pass up this book -- it's a definite 'must read.'

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A terrific allegorical tale

    Mark Smart is extremely depressed. First he made all ¿A¿s in his first year at the University of Utah, but due to cutbacks at the school his scholarship is dropped, his job at the Registrar terminated, and he cannot afford to remain there. His Alabama hometown girlfriend of four years sent him a Dear John letter informing him she is engaged to someone else. At work cleaning toilets at West High School, he is accused of stealing a CD player. These are minor nuisances that add to his anguish. Eleven days ago his beloved mom Alice died. Now driving at night in November, he plans to join her.-------------------- In Salt Lake City during an early snowstorm, Mark¿s sixteen years old car dies. He enters The Java Hut coffee shop as they are closing the place down for the night. There he meets kind hearted Macy Wood, who lets him cry on her shoulders. They quickly become friends, and soon afterward Mark knows his feelings are more than just gratitude he is in love. He proposes, but Macy says no. As he returns to Alabama to mend things with his estranged stepfather Stuart, another waitress Joette, who raised a teenage Macy, knows Macy loves Mark and plans to bring them back together even as his stepfather insists he go fight for what he loves.------------------ FINDING NOEL is a terrific allegorical tale that provides readers with encouragement to go after what you cherish and as a reminder that it is not the biological but the nurturing that makes love. Like Joseph raised someone else¿s child, Stuart and Joette were there to bring up a person not related to them by blood. Well written with a strong cast, Richard Paul Evans provides a wonderful life holiday tale.------------------ Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2006

    Put a log on the fire...

    Put a log on the fire, find a comfortable place on the sofa and just enjoy this book. How wonderful it was to savor the experience of Finding Noel. I love books that take me down memory lane and this one did that and more. I love the characters who seem to be even more rich and wonderful. When I finished reading it, I felt as though I knew Mark and Macy and I loved them! I ached for them. I cried with them. And I hoped for them. Richard, this one could be your best yet.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2006

    Finding Noel- The Perfect Christmas Gift!

    I have read many of Richard Paul Evans' books and have always loved the journey they take me on and the emotions I feel. After learning about Richard's mother passing away in February and knowing he wrote this book for her, it added to the beauty of this story. I really feel like the author wrote it with a lot of heart, emotion, pain, and love. Finding Noel is a beautiful story about how people come into our lives at the right time. As I read I could paint pictures in my mind of the characters, setting, and it made me appreciate the detail and cleverness that Richard uses in this story. It is a book that catches your interest from the start and keeps you hopeful and involved until the very last page. I have to admit the best part of the book to me is the Epilogue. I love the way the author ties in the true message of Christmas. As I closed the book I felt feelings of gratitude, love for my family, and inspiration to help others. This book is a wonderful gift for the holiday season!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2006

    A Warm Holiday Tale

    Finding Noel is a sweet story which harkens back to the roots of the author's past Christmas themes of longing for loved ones and fighting for what's most important in this life... and then holding on tight! His fans are in for a wonderful holiday treat... something to savour and to share.

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