Finding Your Voice: How to Put Personality in Your Writing / Edition 1

Finding Your Voice: How to Put Personality in Your Writing / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Les Edgerton
     
 

ISBN-10: 1582971730

ISBN-13: 2901582971734

Pub. Date: 02/28/2003

Publisher: F+W Media

You know a great literary "voice" when you hear it: David Sedaris' humorous cynicism. Elmore Leonard's weary, smart-mouthed dialogue. Nick Hornby's simple yet imaginative descriptions. It's the kind of writing you should aspire to, right? Well...not quite. Each of these authors found success in part by developing their own unique voice: a writing style that helped…  See more details below

Overview

You know a great literary "voice" when you hear it: David Sedaris' humorous cynicism. Elmore Leonard's weary, smart-mouthed dialogue. Nick Hornby's simple yet imaginative descriptions. It's the kind of writing you should aspire to, right? Well...not quite. Each of these authors found success in part by developing their own unique voice: a writing style that helped define -- and throw the spotlight on -- their work. Now Les Edgerton shows you how to develop a voice of your own, one that rises above the literary din because of its individuality, not in spite of it! Inside, he provides guidelines, advice and dozens of exercises for recognizing and developing a natural style that will make your characters, stories and dialogue better and more memorable. Whether you write fiction, non-fiction or poetry, Finding Your Voice is a must for your personal library. Let's face it -- editors, agents and readers all want to read something fresh and new. By finding your voice, you'll be giving them exactly what they want!

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901582971734
Publisher:
F+W Media
Publication date:
02/28/2003
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240

Table of Contents

Introduction1
Chapter 1Why Writers Lose Their Original Voices10
Chapter 2Why Unpublished Writers Have an Inferiority Complex35
Chapter 3You Want Me to Change My Entire Writing Style?56
Chapter 4It's Okay to be Yourself. I mean-It's REALLY OKAY!66
Chapter 5Here's Lookin' at You, Kid ... A New and Different Way of Looking at Your Audience75
Chapter 6The Elements of Personality or "Voice"102
Chapter 7Strategies for Getting and Keeping Your Voice on the Page144
Chapter 8The Link Between Material and Voice ... And Why You Should Break It167
Chapter 9Undue Influences-Tuning Out the Masters173
Chapter 10How to Seize Control of your Novel, Short Story, Nonfiction Article or Book and Make It Your Own189
Chapter 11What Top Writers, Editors and Agents Say About Voice199
Chapter 12A Disclaimer224
Index238

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Finding Your Voice: How to Put Personality in Your Writing 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up a copy of Finding Your Voice out of curiosity. Over the years, I¿d come to suspect that the term voice was being misused as a concept of understanding writing. I wondered if this book would enlighten me, or if it would confirm my suspicions. It did both.///// In Finding Your Voice, Les Edgerton does a great job of coaching writers on how to bring out their own personality in their writing. He explains why writers often fall short in this effort. He recommends exercises to bring out the writer¿s personality. He suggests techniques to make fiction-writing more reader friendly. Overall, the book covers a lot of the art and craft of writing style. I suspect Les Edgerton is a very good writing teacher.///// But my suspicions regarding voice, as it is often used to describe fiction, were confirmed. One of the problems is that voice refers to different subjects. In a story, each character can have a distinctive voice in dialogue and during introspection. Also, if the writer chooses to utilize an on-stage narrator, that narrator can have a distinctive voice. The problem with voice is when the term is used to describe the writer¿s style.///// Unfortunately, the subject of the writer¿s voice has morphed into confusing and misleading babble. The next-to-last chapter of Finding Your Voice provides examples of the conflicting views of top writers, editors, and agents regarding this subject.///// Today¿s novel-writer would be better served if Les Edgerton would: 1) re-name the book Developing Your Own Writing Style, 2) delete all reference to writer¿s voice, and 3) expand the text to more fully cover other aspects of style.///// Although Finding Your Voice confirmed my suspicions regarding voice, I found plenty of ideas and insight to make the book worth its purchase price, and more.