Finnglas and the Stones of Choosing

Finnglas and the Stones of Choosing

by Fay Sampson
     
 

"On, Cloud–Clearer, on!" screamed Princess Finnglas. But she knew her horse was already pouring out all his strength. And the rival black stallion was still ahead. Finnglas is riding for her life and the crown. If she loses, she will die and the Summer Land will fall into the grip of evil powers. But this race is only the first of the Seven Trials.

Overview

"On, Cloud–Clearer, on!" screamed Princess Finnglas. But she knew her horse was already pouring out all his strength. And the rival black stallion was still ahead. Finnglas is riding for her life and the crown. If she loses, she will die and the Summer Land will fall into the grip of evil powers. But this race is only the first of the Seven Trials. There are more terrifying tests ahead.

Editorial Reviews

Guardian
Breathless, tumbling fantasy. The mixture of epic poetry, heroism, and suspense should enchant 10 to 13s.
School Library Journal
Gr 7-9-These series titles crash headlong into C. S. Lewis's "Narnia" books and Evangeline Walton's "Mabinogion" titles. Pangur B n, the first book in the series, is, of course, inspired by the ninth-century poem, but instead of a mighty hunter, the feline here is small and cowardly. After he and Niall, a monk, contribute to the death of a king's son, they are banished to the sea for a year and a day. In the same curragh is Princess Finnglas, who is bent on avenging her brother. After several trials and tasks, all is made well by the sacrifice of Arthmael, the laughing dolphin. In Finnglas, the young princess must fight to gain her rightful throne. She submits to seven trials, is finally named queen, and drives out the Druids, dedicating her kingdom to Arthmael. The battle between the Christian church and the Druids lacks any of the grace of that same battle in Walton's Prince of Annwn (Macmillan, 1992). If the besetting fault of these books is the breakneck pace that allows no spaces for readers to catch a figurative breath and reflect on what has passed, the overriding achievement is in the use of language. Sampson freely mines Welsh lore and geography; Arthmael is thought to be one name for King Arthur, and Manawydan, who commands the seahorses, is the son of the sea king Llyr. By the same token, the dialogue leaves much to be desired. Speech is often stilted and the tone shifts from a measured, formal style to something that sounds quite modern. Serviceable additions where Christian fiction or Celtic lore is in demand.-Patricia A. Dollisch, DeKalb County Public Library, Decatur, GA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780745911243
Publisher:
Lion Hudson PLC
Publication date:
01/01/1989
Series:
Pangur Ban Ser.
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
128
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

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