Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY, and the Lost Story of 1970

( 10 )

Overview

Fire and Rain tells the story of four iconic albums of 1970 and the lives and times of the artists who made them, set against the backdrop of the twelve turbulent months when the '60s effectively ended and the '70s began.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Audiobook (CD - Library - Unabridged CD)
$81.89
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$90.99 List Price
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (4) from $52.29   
  • New (2) from $58.64   
  • Used (2) from $52.29   
Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY, and the Lost Story of 1970

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - ebook for paperback edition)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 37%)$16.00 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Fire and Rain tells the story of four iconic albums of 1970 and the lives and times of the artists who made them, set against the backdrop of the twelve turbulent months when the '60s effectively ended and the '70s began.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Rolling Stone editor Browne focuses his fourth book on the year 1970 and how the music from four mega-bands responded to and influenced the times. His audio time line weaves descriptions of national events—Kent State and the Weathermen bombings—with the melodrama of the musicians' lives. The story is one of tragedy and transition. Three of the four groups discussed have disbanded by the narrative's conclusion, and the music and promise of the 1960s has come to an end. Browne's excellent reporting on the music makes up for the flimsy premise tying his stories together. Veteran voice actor Sean Runette performs excellently, but transitions between unrelated subjects can make the time line challenging to follow in stop-and-start audio format. Recommended for fans of the highlighted musicians. ["Browne engagingly illuminates many overlooked stories that may not be familiar to even dedicated rock enthusiasts," read the review of the Da Capo hc, LJ Xpress Reviews, 6/10/11.—Ed.]—Mark John Swails, Johnson Cty. Community Coll. Lib., Overland Park, KS
Publishers Weekly
Browne (Goodbye 20th Century) revisits the musical, political, and cultural shifts of 1970, a year that left an indelible mark on rock history. As the Beatles disintegrated, the career of a shy, unassuming singer/songwriter named James Taylor was just beginning. Meanwhile, Simon & Garfunkel and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young released iconic albums (Bridge Over Trouble Water and Déjà Vu), each of which ultimately led to the demise of their collaboration. Using new interviews with the artists and their colleagues, as well as access to rare documents and recordings from the period, Browne employs a smart narrative style to make such well-worn stories as the Beatles' breakup fresh again. Through it all, he remains convinced that the first year of that new decade was just as pivotal as its well-documented predecessors—a perfect reflection of the chaotic end of the Sixties and the beginning of a new era in rock. This book will appeal to classic rock fans, as well as younger readers who may find this to be a fascinating look at an era when an artist's reputation was built not on social media sites, but on the music itself. (June)
From the Publisher

Named one of the “Best Rock Books of the Year” by Rolling Stone

Kirkus Reviews, 5/15/11
“Through the lens of four fabulously successful musical acts, a Rolling Stone contributing editor looks at the moment 1960s idealism “began surrendering to the buzz-kill comedown of the decade ahead…A vivid freeze-frame of Hall of Fame musicians, some of whom would go on to make fine records, none ever again as central to the culture.”

Cityview Magazine, June 2011
“Browne has penned a classic.”
 
BookPage, June 2011
“Eminently readable….Browne’s engrossing account of this fertile but volatile period sets the standard by which comprehensive musical histories should be judged.”
 
Parade, 5/27/11
“This juicy, fascinating read transports you back to a turbulent year…Browne artfully describes the creation of these classic songs in a way that makes them seem brand-new.”
 
New YorkDaily News, 5/27/11
“Through rich anecdotes and incisive analysis…the book threads traces of politics, but music remains its worthy focus.  The form of the book, told chronologically over four seasons, lends it the compacted, real-time drama of an episode of ‘24’.”
 
New YorkPost, 5/29/11
“Behind-the-scenes, fly-on-the-wall looks at [the artists] make it a worthwhile read.”
 
Associated Press, 6/1/11
"Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY, and the Lost Story of 1970 is a worthy addition to anyone's collection of such music histories…the nuanced account of the struggles inherent in making music is more than enough to satisfy, as are the delightful surprise connections and asides scattered throughout the book. . . . I couldn't help but be riveted by the account of this group of immensely talented people who also, when they weren't at each other's throats, seemed like they'd be cool to hang out with.”
 
Entertainment Weekly, 6/10/11
A “Best New Summer Read”
 
Vineyard Gazette, 5/20/11
“A social commentary, a fan’s look, an evolution of a generation and an up-close view of backstage dynamics in the music business, it’s also a book that will revive personal and social memories for anyone who ever lived their life to these songs.”
 
SecondAct.com, 5/25/11
 “Both fresh and revelatory … Browne's work reminds me of the late Otto Friedrich's classic book about Hollywood in the 1940s, City of Nets.”
 
ChicagoReader, 5/26/11
“Its principal task is to dive into the 60s hangover on a day-to-day level, describing the tensions that drove U.S./UK rock culture—emblematized by the four artists in the subtitle—toward the sweet, consoling embrace of Let It Be, Bridge Over Troubled Water, Sweet Baby James, and Deja Vu,  …  Browne renders this somnambulant period with such care that he makes it seem alive.”
 
Mojo, June 2011
“Highly readable … shifts between the key points smoothly. He unearths some little-told stories along the way.”
 
BookPage, 6/1/11
“It wasn’t obvious as it was happening, but, as David Browne shows in Fire and Rain, 1970 turned out to be a watershed year in popular music.  … Browne’s engrossing account of this fertile but volatile period sets the standard by which comprehensive musical histories should be judged.”

Library Journal, 6/8/11
Browne engagingly illuminates many overlooked stories that may not be familiar to even dedicated rock enthusiasts. Highly recommended.”

Bookforum.com, Summer 2011
“Exhilarating and meticulously researched…Browne is a superb chronicler of popular music and a fine social historian.”
 
HollywoodReporter.com, 6/6/11
“An irresistible page-turner, a gossipy, scholarly account of an explosive rock moment, as organized as the times were chaotic— as well-crafted as a Beatles tune. The book is a brilliant lens on a time you only thought you knew.”
 
St. PetersburgTimes, 6/5/11
“If you liked Life, then try Fire and Rain.”
 
Indiewire.com, 6/7/11
“Totally entertaining…There are drugs, love affairs and infighting behind the music, a story Browne smartly sets against the backdrop of a culture emerging from the turbulent 60’s. I can’t say I’m a big music person, but I was hooked from the minute I opened it.”
 
UGO, 6/7/11
The big picture that Browne paints throughout Fire and Rain, is a thoroughly fascinating and entertaining one.”
 
Music Tap, 6/7/11
“Compelling new tome… By placing the music in the context of time, but never letting the time overwhelm the subject of his book, Browne strips away that mythic quality of each release and makes them seem fresh and new again.”
 
Blurt! Magazine, 6/13/11
“[An] interesting and sometimes surprisingly informative book.”
 
BostonGlobe, 6/13/11
“Absorbing…Browne avoids sentimentality and nostalgia, aiming instead at a fresh look at the bands and their milieu. Some of the period details are almost astonishingly apt.”
 
Blogcritics.org, 6/16/11
“David Browne's masterfully researched and written Fire And Rain is the sort of book that should have come along much sooner than it actually did…[A] compelling, thought provoking read…Fascinating.”
 

New YorkTimes, 6/24/11
“As a reporter [Browne] is dogged and earnest; as a profile writer, crisp and professional. As “Fire and Rain” jaunts from London to Laurel Canyon, Mr. Browne drops in memorable details…very readable.”
 
People Magazine, 7/4/11
“A fascinating look at a pivotal year in the lives of James Taylor, Simon & Garfunkel, the Beatles, and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.”
 
NPR.org, 6/20/11
“Browne is an incredibly intelligent writer…His considerable narrative skills make Fire and Rainone of the most entertaining and informative books of the year. It's bound to be enjoyed not only by rock fans, but by anyone interested in popular culture and social change.”
 
New YorkMagazine, 6/20/11
“[A] juicy history of 1970 in rock.”
 
MiamiHerald, 6/24/11
“[An] intriguing new book…Fire and Rain works as a history lesson but is foremost a fast-paced music fan’s appreciation of the brilliance of that era’s artists.”
 
Showbiz411.com, 6/24/11
“A beautifully wrought compelling recounting of a key year in pop music…full of great tidbits”
 
San AntonioExpress News, 6/23/11
“One of the truly great rock books”
 
Christian Science Monitor, 6/21/11
“Dishes the drama and details how it all went down”
 
Record Collector (UK), July 2011
“Browne is an excellent writer and tells this story very well.”
 
Metro (UK), 6/22/11
“Engaging”
 
Demetri Martin, 7/1/11
It’s a fun read”
 
MiamiHerald, 6/30/11
“Intriguing new book…Fire and Rain works as a history lesson but is foremost a fast-paced music fan’s appreciation of the brilliance of that era’s artists.”
 
Financial Times, 6/26/11
“[Browne’s] attention to detail lends this compelling book a depth and richness rarely found in rock biography.”

 

Publishers Weekly, 7/18
“A fascinating look at an era when an artist's reputation was built not on social media sites, but on the music itself.”
 

Publishers Weekly, 7/18/11
“Using new interviews with the artists and their colleagues, as well as access to rare documents and recordings from the period, Browne employs a smart narrative style to make such well-worn stories as the Beatles' breakup fresh again…This book will appeal to classic rock fans, as well as younger readers who may find this to be a fascinating look at an era when an artist's reputation was built not on social media sites, but on the music itself.”
 
NPR.org, 7/20/11
“The book offers a refreshed view of the moment when the counterculture allegedly went soft. Browne's finely-detailed, engrossing narrative.”
 
PopMatters.com, 7/14/11
“Had Tolstoy been a reporter for Rolling Stone, he could’ve told this story better, but it would have taken him an extra 500 pages.”
 
AustinChronicle, 7/15/11
“Chronicled capital-R rock music’s transition from late 1960s insurrection to early 1970s introspection.”
 
Irish Times (Ireland), 8/6/11
“Browne tells us much we didn’t know about each artist, but also gives a decent historical account of that year’s events, from the Apollo 13 crisis to the Kent State shootings to the bomb-making activism of The Weathermen to Nixon’s bid for re-election. Through numerous interviews and painstaking research, Browne has built up a forensic picture of these 12 months, and allows us to become flies on the wall at recording sessions, band meetings, public appearances and backstage at concerts.” 
 
Hartsville Messenger, 8/3/11
“Using new interviews with the artists and their colleagues, as well as access to rare documents and recordings from the period, Browne employs a smart narrative style to make such well-worn stories as the Beatles’ breakup fresh again.”
 
American Profile, 8/8/11
“For music fans, modern-history buffs and pop-culture junkies, it’s a fact-filled, insight-rich look at the beginnings of an era in which America grew up in more ways than one.”
 
Paste, 8/22/11 “Browne examines in this worthy book not only the music scene but also the backdrop of civil unrest that took place politically, culturally and musically in the dawning year of the ’70s…Browne is the perfect person to tell this story…The man has credentials, and his narrative skills weave stories in a way that doesn’t lose readers along the journey.”

Times Square Gossip, 9/2/11
“As a music fan, I appreciated the new details that [Browne] uncovers for each of the artists…The way he weaves in the timely moments in society (Kent State; Vietnam); wrapping them around his words…is miraculous…If you're a music fan from those halcyon days of the 70's...this one's for you.”

HITS Daily Double, 9/9/11
“[Browne] puts his mark on yet another transition period in rock and roll, connecting the dots to delineate a pop music universe that now seems so much more naïve and innocent.”
 
Huffington Post, 9/11/11
“Fascinating doesn’t even come close as we get a never before seen glimpse of the time leading up to Paul McCartney’s announcement that he was leaving the Beatles and the intertwining, almost incestuous connections between all four of these artists, not to mention the tremendous cultural tremors going through the body politic as a whole and how this informed their music.”
 
Shelf Life (Canada), October 2011
“A true trip down musical memory lane…This was a most interesting time in music and life, with much happening on the world stage. The author captures it precisely, giving us the inside story of the four top acts and how their music changed the music world for the better.”
 
American History, December 2011
“This respected music critic builds his plot according to his tastes. Even if you don’t share them, you’ll find his insights and writing rewarding.”

Relix
, October/November 2011
“Browne’s engaging new book explores a bittersweet cultural moment…An altogether absorbing narrative.”

Stuff I Like (blog), 11/27/11
“Evocative and splendidly written.”

JamBands.com
Fire And Rain should be handed out to students in every institution of learning across this fair land…A well-crafted, totally engaging history that reads like a novel…A very readable tale of cultural and political change.”
 

The Nervous Breakdown Gift Guide
“No music fan can afford to take a pass on this book.”
 
VEVO Holiday Gift Guide
 “A vivid read” 

Kirkus Reviews

Through the lens of four fabulously successful musical acts, aRolling Stonecontributing editor looks at the moment 1960s idealism "began surrendering to the buzz-kill comedown of the decade ahead."

By decade's end, the '60s counterculture ethos of peace, love and togetherness lay pretty much in ruins. Browne (Goodbye 20th Century: A Biography of Sonic Youth, 2008, etc.) alludes to many dismal headline events that dominated the news of 1970—the shootings at Kent and Jackson State, the Manson trial, the Weather Underground's terror bombings, Apollo 13 limping home from space—but focuses here on the music makers, the most visible representatives of the youth subculture whose collaborations became every bit as dysfunctional as the Establishment they mocked. Released in 1970, the Beatles'Let It Be, Simon & Garfunkel'sBridge Over Troubled Water and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young'sDéjà vuwere their final albums together and signaled the end of an era. The early fame and the seemingly effortless camaraderie gave way to jealousy, greed, infighting and disarray. Artists turned their backs on group albums in favor of solo efforts; intimate concerts were replaced by stadium shows; outdoor festivals, attempting to duplicate Woodstock, were brushed by fans demanding free admission. Hard drugs hovered over the entire scene, crippling musicians—Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin overdosed—and addling fans. That same year, James Taylor, famously a former mental patient, himself strung out, issuedSweet Baby James, for better or worse, the herald of a softer, more relaxed vibe that would dominate the years ahead. Browne skillfully interleaves the stories of these musicians during this tumultuous year, making room for substantial walk-ons by other significant industry figures like Bill Graham, Peter Yarrow, Phil Spector, Rita Coolidge, Carole King and Joni Mitchell. Intimately familiar with the music, fully comprehending the cross-pollination among the artists, thoroughly awake to the dynamics of the decade's last gasp, the author expertly captures a volatile and hugely interesting moment in rock history.

A vivid freeze-frame of Hall of Fame musicians, some of whom would go on to make fine records, none ever again as central to the culture.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781452633718
  • Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/19/2011
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Library - Unabridged CD
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

David Browne is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone and the author of three books: Dream Brother (2001), Amped (2004), and Goodbye 20th Century (2008). He also contributes to the New York Times, NPR, and other outlets. He lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Prologue: January 5

Part 1 Winter Into Spring: A Song That They Sing When They Take to the Highway 25

Part 2 Spring Into Summer: A Feeling I Can't Hide 113

Part 3 Summer Into Fall: Away, I'd Rather Sail Away 187

Part 4 Pall Into Winter: Gone Your Way, Ill Go Mine 253

Epilogue: December 315

Coda: October 2009 327

Acknowledgments 335

Notes and Sources 339

Index 347

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Snapshot In Time

    If you are a fan of any of the bands and/or singers listed in the title, then this is a book for you. Readers follow the descent of the Beatles, the quick rise and fall of CSNY, Simon and Garfunkel's fall and Simon's singular rise, and James Taylor's ascent into the singer/songwriter world of music. We're given glimpses into their personal lives and the way their lives and music tangled together, then came apart.

    David Browne does occasionally touch upon the politics and social aspects of life in 1970 but this book is mainly about the music of these particular artists. I found it a well-written, relatively unbiased account one of the major turning points in music's history.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 9, 2011

    BORING writing style - did not like the book at all!

    The author jumps around too much in his writing. It's not that I couldn't keep up with the information (I mean, really, what's to keep with - nothing new was revealed). It was so fragmented - no glue to hold the story together. I found myself jumping ahead to see if the book was gonna improve. Well, folks, it didn't. Sure wish I'd read the sample before buying. And that's another issue - why the high price for an ebook?!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 8, 2011

    Great book on a very interesting year...must read for fans of CSNY, JT, S&G, and the Beatles.

    With great style and incredible detail, Fire and Rain really captivates what most music lovers probably don't realize was a pretty big year...I didn't. With great ease and seamless transitions, you'll be reading about the Beatles then jump to JT then CSNY to Simon & Grafunkel then back again. Music, sex, drugs, and great short sections on the world events that coincided with the making of some real classics. An entertaining and easy read...and count the number of times you say, "wow, I didn't know that!"

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 7, 2011

    Great Book but Too Much for an Ebook

    Thanks for the sample B&N...Well written and extremely interesting. But, it's too much for an ebook. You have gone beyond the tipping point. Sell the book for less than $10 and more folks would buy it...jb

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)