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Fire-Heart
     

Fire-Heart

5.0 5
by C.S. Marks
 

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In the second of the Tales of Alterra, the World that Is.

.the Elfhunter has been laid low, but he is not yet vanquished. Now there is a new challenge to be faced; Orogond has sworn on the grave of his father that he will find his wayward brother, Hallagond, and return him to the way of the Light. But Hallagond has been driven forth by shame, and believes that he is

Overview

In the second of the Tales of Alterra, the World that Is.

.the Elfhunter has been laid low, but he is not yet vanquished. Now there is a new challenge to be faced; Orogond has sworn on the grave of his father that he will find his wayward brother, Hallagond, and return him to the way of the Light. But Hallagond has been driven forth by shame, and believes that he is unworthy of redemption. The Company is now set upon a path that will take them into unfamiliar, distant lands filled with strange and intriguing people. Not only will they encounter wonders unknown to any in the northern lands, but they must now face a new, incredibly savage enemy. And all the while, Gaelen of the Greatwood is summoning Gorgon Elfhunter to follow after her, for she would lead him into lands where Elves do not venture. Should he find her, even the strength and will of the Fire-heart might not be enough.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Silverman
In part two of the series "A Tale of Alterra, The World That Is," Gaelen, with her Company expanded by two, is still hunting Gorgon, the —half-elf monster who is still hunting for her. Orogond, the strange man who appeared in the first book, is now on a quest to find his elder brother. In one of those unusual things that happen in this sort of book, the reader finds out long before Orogond does that he has a younger brother. His younger half-brother brother Gorgon's birth, "engineered" by Wrothgar, master of the dark forces, caused their mother's death. Gorgon wears a ring that allows him to see through Gaelen's eyes—"bright" eyes, as readers are reminded constantly. She, in turn, sees a bit through his eyes, and manages to cut off the hand that wears the ring. So Gorgon goes underground to hide until he heals. None of the Company knows where he is, so they go searching for him, walking more than 1,000 miles, "through vast lands both savage and civilized" to the city where they will find sanctuary for a time. Here readers finally learn about the horses promised in the first book's blurb to be "delightfully intelligent." They can also be fierce warriors when called upon. The city's peace is about to be shattered by the invasion of the "Scourge," an army of other-worldly creatures with a living weapon that has never been defeated—a fire-breathing, bad-tempered dragon named Lokai. The Company of experienced warriors realizes that the city is ill-prepared for battle. The wall protecting it was supposed to be invincible, but it will never stand against the Scourge and Lokai. Yet Gorgon Elf-Hunter is also traveling with the Scourge. Although the entire city is mobilized to build an addition to the wall, widening and strengthening it, readers do not know whether their efforts will be successful, but after many pages, they can be fairly sure that they have succeeded. A glossary of names accompany a pronunciation guide and maps. Reviewer: Judy Silverman

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781425944421
Publisher:
AuthorHouse
Publication date:
07/12/2006
Pages:
732
Product dimensions:
1.61(w) x 9.00(h) x 6.00(d)

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Fire-Heart 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Paces.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Go ur free
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is niw back :3
swordgod More than 1 year ago
I have to admit, although I thoroughly enjoyed reading Elfhunter, nothing could have prepared me for the epic that is Fire-heart. This book is an epic in every sense of the word: larger than life featuring a cast of thousands, frighteningly intense, and utterly unforgettable. Not only are the stakes higher than they were in Elfhunter, but they are more personal too, making the battles fought within its pages even more desperate than what is typical for this kind of fiction. Few fantasy books have bestowed upon me such wonder of its sheer scope of storytelling. Fire-heart not only rises beyond the Tolkienesque charm of its predecessor, but rightfully stakes its claim as a hallmark in the lexicon of fantasy literature. It is both difficult and daunting to try to imagine the effort that went into creating this tale. It is neither brief, nor given over to flights of fancy. There is a purpose to this tale that drives it ferociously to its bitter-sweet conclusion. Many middle chapters of trilogies suffer from lack of author foresight. Like all the great sagas, Fire-heart is but the second movement in a grand opera. And its performers are now iconic figures furiously pitted against one another in the battle between good and evil. Sides are chosen and there is no threat of compromise between the opposing forces. Fire-heart picks up from where Elfhunter left off, reintroducing us to the members of the Company, a motley band of heroes united in their struggle against the dreaded Gorgon Elfhunter. However, Gorgon was terribly wounded in his last fray with The Company and has taken a respite to regain his strength. The Elven Hunter-scout Gaelen Taldin decides to follow her human companion Orogond Thaylon on his quest to find his brother Hallagond, who was separated from him at childhood. Joining them on this quest is the remainder of The Company: the Elves Galador and Nelwyn, Fima the Dwarf, the human ranger Thorndil, and of course, a coterie of very charismatic horses. But this is no light quest. The search for Hallagond will take The Company through strange and perilous lands and test their mettle in ways they cannot imagine. All the while, Gorgon is plotting his fiendish revenge against The Company. And this time, it will take more than luck or skill or even magic for The Company to survive the threats mounting against them. For most of the reading of Fire-heart, my mouth was left open, eyes wide, and brow furrowed, a helpless captive to the drama unfolding within the pages of this book. Fire-heart is a throwback to the great fantasy tales of old, marrying a contemporary sensibility with its roots firmly planted in the classics. I can't help but believe that Fire-heart is the kind of book that Lewis, Tolkien, Dunsany, and Melville would have read voraciously in front of the fireplace devouring every page with childlike delight. I know I did (minus the fireplace)! Fire-heart by C.S. Marks is highly recommended and in my humble opinion a must-read. Now on to Ravenshade!