Fire in the Heart: A Spiritual Guide for Teens

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A fifteen-year-old boy is walking through a swirling fog on his way to school when a voice calls out, "Come here. We need to talk." Out of the mist emerges an old man with a white beard. He is a fantastic figure, as wizardly as Merlin, as wise as Socrates, as peaceful as Buddha. Whoever he is, the old man has appeared on that very day to change the boy's life.
"You are old enough to learn about things," he says mysteriously. "And who is going ...

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Overview

A fifteen-year-old boy is walking through a swirling fog on his way to school when a voice calls out, "Come here. We need to talk." Out of the mist emerges an old man with a white beard. He is a fantastic figure, as wizardly as Merlin, as wise as Socrates, as peaceful as Buddha. Whoever he is, the old man has appeared on that very day to change the boy's life.
"You are old enough to learn about things," he says mysteriously. "And who is going to teach you but me?"
The old man gives the boy four days of "soul training," a time of riddles, tricks, parables, and fantastic twists that bring out surprising answers to each of four burning questions about spirituality:
Do I have a soul?
How do wishes come true?
What is the supreme force in the universe?
How can I change the world?
The boy was Deepak Chopra, who grew up to become an acclaimed writer and teacher about the same invisible things that the old man had taught him. Fire in the Heart is Dr. Chopra's first book for young adults. Its aim is to pass on this soul training to young readers.
"The old man with the white beard showed me the spiritual side of life," writes the author, "where real passion and excitement come from. So before you begin, take a deep breath. This story could turn out to be yours."
"[Spirit is] everywhere, making sure that everything is connected. The light from a star billions of light years away is the same light that makes plants grow here on earth. The plants give food; the food has allowed you to develop in your mother's womb; and today you look at that star with the eyes that the stars gave you. There's the cosmic connection."
— from Fire in the Heart

By recounting his own experiences at age fifteen, Deepak Chopra, a noted Hindu author and physician, provides a blueprint for teens who are seeking their own spiritual paths.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Deepak Chopra -- bestselling author and speaker about spirituality -- provides this soul-stirring guide for today's teens about igniting the inner "fire" that glows inside each of us. In his first book aimed at younger readers, Chopra's series of lessons is divided into four parts that answer major questions about the self and life's purpose: "Do I Have a Soul?" "How Do Wishes Come True?" "What Is the Supreme Force in the Universe?" "How Can I Change the World?" No doubt these are complex questions, but Chopra's explanations are told simply in short vignettes of four meetings between a 15-year-old Indian boy (meant to be Chopra himself in his youth) and "Baba," a wise man he meets one day. Baba and his student discuss many lofty topics, including "the way of the heart" and "the secret of attraction," always with the old man's lesson illustrated through observations of nature, other people, or the boy's responses to his questions. To make teachings clear and practical for readers, Chopra also thankfully includes a "What I Learned" explanation after each episode, giving teens plenty to chew over along with his final "Soul Alphabet," which describes 26 important words to remember in the path to spiritual happiness. If you're looking for an uplifting, peaceful read that will put you on the path to understanding this crazy thing called life, Chopra's guide is a superb place to begin. Matt Warner
From the Publisher
Publishers Weekly starred review Chopra shows a great talent for explaining intangible and complex ideas lucidly and even grippingly, and teens are almost certain to respond to the intelligence and vividness of his presentation.

Time magazine [One of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century]...the poet-prophet of alternative medicine.

Mikhail Gorbachev Deepak Chopra is undoubtedly one of the most lucid and inspired philosophers of our times.

Publishers Weekly
The author of blockbuster adult guides to spirituality and mind/body health, Chopra addresses a YA audience for the first time with this challenging and inviting book. He frames the book as a series of four daylong exchanges between the then-15-year-old Chopra and a wise old man met on a hill, revolving around four basic questions: "Do I have a soul? How do wishes come true? What is the supreme force in the universe? How can I change the world?" Early on, the wise old man introduces the notion that there is only one soul, of which each person has a piece; and he teaches that the soul can always be trusted. The author adds that other terms have been used for "soul": "spirit, God, the divine spark, the breath of life," and as the book progresses, he increasingly refers to God. For the most part, however, he avoids religion, instead drawing on folktales, quick exercises and everyday examples to engage readers in spiritual explorations. The book concludes with a "Soul Alphabet," an A-to-Z list of easy-to-do but profound spiritual practices designed "to create moments of `Aha!' every day." Chopra shows a great talent for explaining intangible and complex ideas lucidly and even grippingly, and teens are almost certain to respond to the intelligence and vividness of his presentation. Ages 12-up. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Deepak Chopra, well known for his work in the field of alternative medicine and healing, now speaks to teenagers in a book that is somewhat modeled on one of his earlier books for adults, The Way of the Wizard (Harmony Books, 1995). In this book too there is an allegorical protagonist (in this case, Chopra's own youthful self) and a spiritual teacher. The teacher, Baba, is a composite character based on people significant to the author's own teenage years. This is not a book that shies away from large questions. Do I have a soul? How do wishes come true? What is the Supreme Force in the universe? And, how can I change the world? These four questions drive the narrative, which is presented in the form of episodes involving the boy and the teacher, followed by the boy's account of what he learned. At times the voice is conversational, at other times reflective. Through short chapters and heartfelt personal anecdotes, Chopra seeks to reveal those aspects of the world that are not visible to the eye, to take readers to a place where they too can find the spark to ignite a fire in the heart. Will kids used to the frantic pace and instant gratification of our lives today slow down enough to read this and get in touch with their souls? If they do, they will find an alphabet of suggested activities to guide them along the way, from "Appreciation" to "Zero" (yes, Zero), including a "legendary creature known as That." Drawing from a multiplicity of sources, from Blake's poetry to the philosophy known as Vedanta, Fire in the Heart offers readers the chance to pause, step back and contemplate where they belong in a much larger scheme of things. 2004, Simon and Schuster, Ages 12 up.
—Uma Krishnaswami
KLIATT - Claire Rosser
Most people know about Deepak Chopra; certainly librarians know about his best-selling books about spirituality that have been written for the general public. This book is written for adolescents, using the familiar motif of a young person seeking wisdom from an older person, in this case Chopra as a 15-year-old in dialog with Baba, an old man with a white beard, about basic questions such as: Do I have a soul?; How do wishes come true?; What is the supreme force in the universe?; and How can I change the world? Adolescence, as we all know, is a time of questioning the teachings of family and searching for meaning and happiness. Chopra doesn't write about organized religions, but rather of individual connection to spirit, and thus offends no one (except the most radical fundamentalists of any faith). Here is perhaps the essence of Chopra's lessons: "The nice things of this world are not divided equally. Some people get more than their share, while others get less. But this pertains only to outward desires. On the inside everyone can win a life that brings equal joy and happiness. Baba told me to wish for just one thing: ‘Make me rich inside,' which means as full of joy and satisfaction as possible. He told me that my soul would help me every day to make this wish come true, no matter how many outward things came my way or not."
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Chopra presents inspirational life lessons spoken in parables by a mysterious teacher who leads an unnamed narrator through a four-day retreat of self-discovery. With the guidance of Baba, the 15-year-old comes to know his true self by generating answers to four major questions: "Do I have a soul? How do wishes come true? What is the supreme force in the universe? How can I change the world?" The teen and Baba spend a day discussing each question; these four sections are divided into smaller lessons or chapters that end with the young man describing what he learned and how he has applied Baba's wisdom to his life. The didactic text demonstrates a cosmic connection between the soul and all things in deliberate, forced dialogue between the teen and his teacher, and the narrator's internal conversation. The prominent themes are consistent with those common to the genre: finding order in chaos, looking for the missing "something" in life, meaningful communication, and understanding and belief in what one cannot see. The book is rather like Antoine de Saint Exup ry's Le Petit Prince meets Chicken Soup for the Soul. The final section, "A Soul Alphabet," contains inspirational words and motivational prose: appreciation, beyond, communicate-. This nondenominational offering could serve as a textbook for a course on self-exploration, faith, or spiritual discovery.-Jodi Kearns, University of Akron, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689862168
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/20/2004
  • Pages: 208
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.48 (w) x 8.74 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

Deepak Chopra

Deepak Chopra has gained worldwide acclaim as a teacher and writer in fields as diverse as mind-body medicine, Ayurveda, the nature of God, and the path to success. Time magazine called him one of the 100 icons of the twentieth century, “the poet-prophet of alternative medicine.” The author of more than sixty-four books translated into over eighty-five languages, including nineteen New York Times bestsellers, Dr. Chopra has sold more than twenty million copies of his books worldwide. He is the founder of the Chopra Center in Carlsbad, California.

Biography

The practice of holistic and mind-body medicine has long been a controversial subject among medical professionals. Some view it as a healthy and natural alternative to chemical pharmaceuticals. Others see it as a system of placebos and new-age chicanery. No matter where one stands on this issue, there is no denying the influence that mind, body, and spirit practitioner Deepak Chopra has had on the world of medicine.

Chopra's bestselling books on a variety of topics have been translated into 35 languages. His lectures, seminars, and learning materials are immensely popular, as are his television specials for PBS. In addition, he has founded his own medical center called the Chopra Center for Well Being and has won fans amongst celebrities ranging from Prince Charles to Mikhail Gorbachev to Demi Moore to David Lynch. When financier/philanthropist Michael Milken was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he claimed that Chopra's holistic methods shrunk his lymph nodes by 90%.

Chopra's interest in alternative medicine initially grew out of concern for his own health. After moving from India to set up a practice medicine in Boston some 25 years ago, Chopra succumbed to many of the stresses that plague medical professionals. As a result, he guzzled coffee, chain-smoked, and drank heavily. Once he began studying eastern philosophies by way of Krishnamurti and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, he became aware of medical practices outside of the sometimes limited western perspective. This awakening changed his life.

While Chopra is viewed as a major proponent of the role of Eastern philosophies in healing, he does not reject western medicine. In fact, what makes his approach so unique is the way he incorporates the best aspects of western medical research into his theories. This amalgamation of medical philosophies is at the root of self-help volumes like Restful Sleep, Perfect Weight, and Boundless Energy. Elsewhere, Chopra has addressed such diverse issues as reversing the aging process (Ageless Body, Timeless Mind), perfecting personal relationships (The Path to Love), and achieving capitalist goals via Eastern philosophies (The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success).

Chopra has also become concerned with the causes of war and violence and the principles of Eastern religions, especially Buddhism, and his books on these subjects have garnered praise from such major international figures as the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, and Boutros-Boutros Ghali. Consequently, Chopra continues to play a significant role in world health and world politics in spite of detractors and skeptics. With an immense body of work behind him and more volumes of wisdom sure to follow, he continues to preach the simple philosophy he is certain is the key to understanding ourselves, mentally and physically: "We're not human beings that have occasional spiritual experiences, it's the other way around: we're spiritual beings that have occasional human experiences."

Good To Know

In 1999, Time magazine named Chopra one of the Top 100 Icons and Heroes of the Century.

Chopra's father was a prominent cardiologist and an anglophile who distrusted Indian philosophies and alternative medical practices.

Despite his reputation as a serious-minded intellectual, Chopra describes himself as "playful" and "carefree."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Deepak Chopra M.D.
    2. Hometown:
      La Jolla, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1946
    2. Place of Birth:
      New Delhi, India
    1. Education:
      All India Institute of Medical Sciences

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: Day One

Do I Have a Soul?

Baba

When I was fifteen, my school was on a green hillside overlooking a valley even more green and lush. That part you already know. Every day I saw this beautiful view, except when the valley filled with billowing mist. On those mornings I walked to school with wisps of white curling around me, like walking through clouds. It was on just such a day, as I was making my way down the road, that a stranger's voice called out.

"Come," it said. "I've been waiting."

The voice seemed to come from another world. I imagine you've walked through fog and know how it creates a hush all around you, like a cocoon. Then my eye caught something. An old man was sitting under the biggest, most twisted tree by the side of the road.

"Baba, I'm on my way to school," I said. "You must be waiting for someone else." I grew up in India, and baba is a term of respect that is given to someone who is considered a wise or holy man.

"We need to talk," he said in a most definite voice. I drew closer. Baba was sitting on the ground with his legs crossed. His beard was almost as white as the immaculate cotton pants and shirt that he wore.

"You're old enough to know things now," he said, not waiting for me to reply. "And who else is going to tell you?"

I felt a shiver run down my spine. "What kind of things?" I asked.

"Invisible things. Secret things." Suddenly Baba laughed. "How mysterious do I have to sound for you to listen?"

I started to forget about school. All kinds of images were filling my mind. Sitting there in that cross-legged position, the old man looked like Buddha, who became enlightened sitting under a tree. His long white beard made Baba look wizardly, like Merlin, and the gleam in his eye told me unmistakably that he must be wise, like Socrates.

"I'm not asking much. Just give me one day," Baba coaxed.

Hesitantly I sat down beside him under the gnarled, twisted tree. The sun was burning the mist off now. Between billows of fog we could glimpse the green tea plantations that filled the valley and surrounding hills.

"This won't be like school," Baba said. "I'm going to teach you a new way to see and a new way to be."

He pointed at the scenery. "What do you see? I mean right now, at this very moment?"

"I see you and this tree, and I see the fog lifting from the valley," I said.

Baba leaned closer. "Want to know what I see? I see your soul." He was catching my attention more and more. "I see a world for you to possess. I see eternity." Baba stopped, and I felt another shiver. "Do you believe me?" he asked.

"I want to believe you, but I can't see any of those things," I said.

"Of course not. It takes a new way of seeing, which is why I had to find you," he said. "A few more years and you might be lost. The old ways are hard to break."

I was at that age when a dreamy inclination comes easily. In fact, the reason I hadn't noticed Baba was that I had been dreaming my way to school. Now it seemed as if I had conjured up a vision out of the mist.

The old man's eyes sharpened. "I'm not talking about fantasies and pink clouds," he said. "You need to know how reality works. Only what's real has power, even when it looks like magic."

"Okay," I said. I had the uncomfortable feeling that he had read my mind when I wondered if he was imaginary.

"In reality there is eternity everywhere," said Baba. "In reality your soul is here for you to experience it. I'll show you what I mean."

He reached down and took up a handful of sand from the side of the road. "Feel it," he said. "What's it like?"

He dropped some of the sand into my hands. "It's rough and sharp and grainy," I said. "And it's warm from the sun."

"Would it surprise you if I told you that none of that is real?" he asked.

I felt confused. "Of course it's real."

"But sand is made of molecules," said Baba. "And molecules aren't sharp or rough or grainy. I could take the molecules in sand and turn them into glass, which is completely smooth. Of course, molecules aren't real either."

"Why not?"

"Because they are made of atoms, and atoms are just blurry clouds of energy. You can't see or touch one, and isn't that how you measure real things, by seeing and touching them? Come to think of it, energy isn't real either."

By now I didn't feel like arguing; this was a completely new way of seeing things, just as he had promised.

"Energy vibrates everywhere in the universe," Baba said. "But it springs from the void, which is empty and still. You won't know what's real until we go there. Shall we?"

He let the sand sift through his fingers, and for a moment it was like watching someone letting the whole world sift through his fingers, the world I thought I lived in.

"This is very strange," I murmured.

"Ah, so the old ways are not looking quite so certain," he said, sounding pleased. "What will be left when everything solid vanishes before your eyes?"

"Nothing," I said.

"Nothing!" he repeated. "That's exactly right. But when we're through, nothing will turn into everything — your soul, God, an infinite world for you to possess. Shall we?" he asked again.

"Absolutely," I said.

What I Learned

Spirituality is about a new way of seeing and a new way of being. When Baba told me that one thing, he told me all I had to know. It wasn't even necessary to use the word spirituality. Words are never as important as reality itself, and what's real is that you and I are like walking clouds at the atomic level. Atoms are a lot more empty than they are solid, which means that we are a lot more empty than we are solid (every person is more than 99.999999 percent empty space; the space between the earth and the sun is much smaller by comparison).

Just beneath the surface, where things look reassuring and solid, we all should fly apart and float away into a fog, but we don't. This is because we aren't really empty. There's an invisible something to be discovered inside us.

"A mysterious force is holding things together and making patterns out of clouds of energy," Baba told me. "You'd better find out what that force is."

"Why?" I asked.

"Because it's everywhere. It's finer than the finest atom. It's subtler than the subtlest energy. It's more real than anything you have ever seen. Don't even compare it to physical forces like gravity and electricity," he said. "Unless an invisible something existed, there would be no universe. And no you."

So that's how it started: A boy and an old man set out to hunt the invisible something that is real even when everything else vanishes. Only years later, after I was grown up, did I come across some lines that perfectly state what we were after. They come from the poet William Blake, and you could call them the motto for this book.

To see a world in a grain of sand

And a heaven in a wild flower,

Hold infinity in the palm of your hand

And eternity in an hour.

You Won't Believe Your Eyes

We'll never find anything invisible if you believe your eyes," said Baba. "Most people do that all the time. It's a bad habit." He pointed to a rock lying beside him on the ground. "Even though this is really an energy cloud, a rock looks very solid and heavy, doesn't it?"

"Yes, because it is. A cloud wouldn't hurt if you dropped one on your foot," I said.

"Ah, you do trust your five senses," said Baba. "Why shouldn't you? After all, the world is flat, just the way your eyes see it."

"Well, no, that's something I couldn't trust," I said.

"Oh, but the sun moves across the sky and sets in the west at night, doesn't it?" said Baba.

"No, it only looks that way," I admitted.

"So you're already in the habit of not trusting your eyes," said Baba, smiling a certain way. I came to call this his I know a secret smile, and one could never quite tell when it was coming.

"Maybe I can't trust my eyes all the time, but how can I rely on what I can't see at all?" I asked.

"Here's a clue wrapped in a story," said Baba. "One night while you were asleep, your body started talking to itself. The heart spoke up first. 'I'm sick of pumping blood all day for the stomach. Why should I? I should be working just for myself.'

"When it heard this, the stomach replied, 'You should talk. I digest food all day for the brain. It takes whatever I give, and frankly, I should be working just for myself too.'

"When the brain heard this, it said, 'I think all the time about what to put in the stomach. Do you realize how easily it gets upset? If anybody should be working just for themselves, it's me.'

"You can see why this argument is silly," said Baba. "In reality every part of the body works for every other part. How do you see that? In your mind. Knowledge goes beyond the senses. I will teach you to see with your mind's eye. Then you'll have no trouble seeing invisible things."

What I Learned

To be spiritual you have to believe in something invisible. Baba taught me this at the very beginning. First you have to stop trusting that only your five senses are right. It's a hard habit to break, because common sense says, "I want to see it, touch it, taste it — then I'll know it's real." But I can make you taste something right now that is totally invisible.

Close your eyes and see a bright yellow lemon in your mind's eye. Now see a knife cutting the lemon into slices, and then see yourself biting into one slice. Did you notice that your mouth started watering? This happened exactly as if you were biting into an actual lemon. All it took was a mental picture, which you produced out of nowhere, and suddenly your body went into action. Millions of cells in your brain formed the image; a signal was sent along the network of nerves inside your head to your mouth; your salivary glands received the message and began to flow.

Here are some amazing facts that follow from this simple experiment:

There was no picture of a lemon inside your head. When you thought of a lemon, your brain cells didn't paint an image or project one on a screen. Your brain is as dark as the blackest cave — there's no light or color inside it. So where did that picture come from?

There was no taste of lemon in your mouth. You didn't actually experience real lemon juice. Your salivary glands, which you may think need food to react to, here needed nothing at all. So where did the sourness come from?

Someplace mysterious. Some place Baba was leading me to, step by step.

Everything Is Connected

Now, let's say you believe there really is something in the universe that you can't see," said Baba. "What does it do? If it had nothing to do, even if you called it God, our lives would stay the same as they are. People probably wouldn't bother looking for it in the first place."

"Probably not," I said.

The sun was rising higher in the sky, and we were comfortable sitting in the cool shade of the tree. Every once in a while I felt a darting worry about missing school, but as long as I kept listening to Baba, even this worry was far away.

"So it's a fine puzzle to figure out what this invisible something could be doing." Baba took in a big breath of air. "Go ahead, do that," he said. "The answer is right here, waiting to be noticed."

I took a deep breath. "I don't notice anything," I said.

"Isn't there something in the air?" asked Baba. "Spring. You can't miss it. When the birds start singing and the buds come out on the trees, when hearts flutter and you see lovers holding hands in the park, isn't spring in the air?"

"Sure, but — "

"Well, why is it spring? There's no reason for it. The earth tilts a few degrees on its axis — so what? Yet in the arctic snow a polar bear knows that it is time to come out of hibernation. Flowers know that it is time to sprout without fear of dying in the frost. Locusts buried seven years in the ground know that it is time to creep forth. How can all this happen from a little tilt?"

Before I could hazard a guess, he said, "I'm going to show you. Imagine that you are a bird. You don't think about spring; you don't think in words at all. How do you know that it's time to fly north again and mate?"

"Spring fever?"

"Good enough," said Baba. "Let's call it an impulse that happens only in the spring. One impulse seems to strike every creature. The locust, the polar bear, the flower, and the bird live far apart, but they feel the same impulse in their own way. Even in the darkest depths of the ocean, where sunlight never reaches, the horseshoe crab knows that it's time to march hundreds of miles to shore, and on one single moonlit night millions of horseshoe crabs appear at once. Amazing.

"Sending that impulse is what something is doing. It holds life together. That's its job. But now we can stop calling it something," said Baba. "Once you know what the invisible force does, you can call it by its rightful name."

"Which is what?" I asked.

pard

"The soul."

What I Learned

People have millions of things to say about the soul, but Baba focused on just one: The soul is the glue of the universe. It's not just sticky glue; it's intelligent. The universe is held together in three invisible ways:

Everything is connected.

Everything looks out for everything else.

Everything is in harmony with the whole.

Your body is a living example of how these three things work. A single cell that isn't connected, that selfishly looks out only for itself, and that refuses to be in harmony with the whole turns into a cancer. One rogue cell among billions is enough to destroy the entire scheme of life. The body's intelligence breaks down, and that is far more devastating than physical harm. Fortunately, such runaway cells are very uncommon, less than one in a million, and the huge majority of these rogues do not survive. The body's inner intelligence knows exactly how life should be regulated for maximum survival.

Baba didn't say that the invisible glue must be called the soul. Other terms have come down through the ages: spirit, God, the divine spark, the breath of life. Often I use the word essence. When you reduce anything to its purest form, you have its essence. An armful of roses can be reduced to half an ounce of pure rose essence. There are billions of people living totally different lives. Yet soul or spirit is the purest part of being alive, no matter who you are. It's your essence.

It's strange that this essence is so hard to find. When we go around looking for it, we're like fish looking everywhere for water but never seeming to find it. I imagine the first fish to discover water happened to jump out of the ocean. Maybe a shark was chasing it, and the fish got desperate. When it splashed back into the sea, the fish had a thrilling moment of Aha! So that's where the water is. I've been swimming in it all my life and never knew.

That's what Baba did for me. Like a fish splashing back into the sea, I discovered that I'd been living with spirit, inside and out, all my life. It's everywhere, making sure that everything is connected. The light from a star billions of light-years away is the same light that makes plants grow here on Earth. The plants give food; the food allowed you to develop in your mother's womb; and today you look at those stars with the eyes that the stars gave you. There's the cosmic connection.

Did you know that with every breath you breathe, you take in millions of atoms breathed out yesterday by someone in China? Those atoms were in another body, circulating in the blood or building a cell or perhaps making a baby. Without knowing it, you are connected to a baby who hasn't even been born yet. The water in your body has the same salt and mineral content as the ocean, which means you are carrying the ocean around inside you. The skin cells that you rubbed off with a towel this morning when you stepped out of the shower contain molecules that were once in the body of Jesus and Buddha and every other holy figure from the past.

So rejoice in the cosmic connection. See yourself on a beautiful spring day. You are full of new life and energy. The day feels perfect. Inside you a spark is gleaming, and you suddenly know for sure that you are alive in a world that is your home. At that moment you are truly tuned in. Baba taught me never to forget that feeling of being connected to everything.

And he was just getting started.

Copyright © 2004 by Deepak Chopra

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Table of Contents


Before You Begin...     1
Do I Have a Soul?     5
How Do Wishes Come True?     49
What Is the Supreme Force in the Universe?     85
How Can I Change the World?     129
A Soul Alphabet     151
The Last Word     197
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Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Deepak Chopra about Fire in the Heart

This is your first book written especially for teens. What inspired you to write for this audience?

Deepak Chopra: First of all, I noticed an absence of books that talked to teenagers at their own level about spirituality. For every hundred books for adults there may be one or two for teens, and those often use religious terms. I wanted to write something holistic that would be free of the word God, a book that would begin with everyday experiences and then lead the reader toward eternal questions.

How does this book differ from your books for adults?

DC: It's actually quite a lot like The Way of the Wizard, in that a magical teacher appears out of nowhere to bring wisdom to a young person. (This book was tentatively titled I Met a Man of Wisdom at one stage.) The difference is that Fire in the Heart stems from my own perspective as a teenager and expands on it for teenagers today.

You dedicate Fire in the Heart to "all the teenagers today and tomorrow upon whom the fate of the world depends." In your opinion, what are the greatest challenges facing teens today?

DC: All the challenges of globalization have a spiritual dimension. Whether it's war, overpopulation, a deteriorating environment, or uncontrollable epidemics of disease, huge problems face us in the future, and only by drawing together as a common humanity can we solve them. I think my generation, born just after World War II, is probably the last that can indulge in the fantasy of becoming enlightened while the rest of the world suffers. Today's teens will find themselves entangled in a world situation.

Do you hear from a lot of teens?

DC: We have an active teen program at the Chopra Center, where I am amazed to find that teens are often profound seekers, and my two children always talked to me throughout their teenage years -- that was very fortunate. Too often teens get isolated from family life, and this is especially damaging on the spiritual side.

Do you think this sort of book is needed more today than in other eras?

DC: Not really. The spiritual path connects a person with reality at its deepest level. It makes you see yourself as a cell in the body of the universe but also as a creator in that universe. This hasn't changed and never will.

Fire in the Heart opens with a 15-year-old boy gazing down at a lush valley in India. The boy is you. Do you think today's teens will be able to relate to your spiritual journey as a young boy?

DC: I find that I relate the most to personal stories if they are told honestly and with passion. This book contains both, I hope. The fact that it's set in an exotic locale like India is really incidental. It could have opened with a 15-year-old girl staring at a wheat field in Nebraska or a vineyard in Italy. If a story speaks from heart to heart, readers connect to it.

What was your experience as a teenager?

DC: A mixture of restlessness and curiosity, and a strong yearning to find something meaningful to believe in. I didn't really find it until I was already an adult and a practicing physician, so I hope this book saves some young people a lot of years of searching.

On "Day One" in Fire in the Heart you encounter Baba (an Indian term of respect that is given to someone who is considered a wise or holy man) as you walk to school. Why do you feel that you were chosen for this spiritual journey at that time?

DC: Baba is a composite for all the reclusive holy men that one of my relatives loved to visit. I went along and met quite a lot of these "saints," as they are called in India. They didn't have their full impact on me until much later, although in the story I make it a one-on-one relationship, a kind of spiritual Karate Kid.

You pose four main questions in Fire in the Heart: Do I have a soul? How do wishes come true? What is the Supreme Force in the Universe? and How can I change the world?. Why do you feel that these four questions will "spark" the "fire" in one's heart?

DC: Experience and tradition. These are the four questions I still ask myself every day. And history tells us that humans have been wrestling with them for centuries.

How can parents and educators best share Fire in the Heart with teens?

DC: The book is only educational in the broadest sense. Teens are always being told how to live, and they feel ambivalent about that. On the surface a teenager will act as if the opinions of adults are very unwelcome, while if asked what they most want in their lives, the number one response is more attention from their parents. So I would respect both sides. As an adult, show that you care about spiritual things, but don't use the book to instruct your teen about how to think or behave.

What are you working on now? Would you like to write another book for teens?

DC: Another book for teens is gestating in my mind right now. I keep returning to the theme of the spiritual warrior, which I've never written about before. Maybe teens will be the first to hear about it! I think boys would be interested right off the bat, so I'll be sure to put in as much for girls as possible. Empowerment is a huge issue for all teenagers.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2004

    I'm More a believer Then ever

    This book is the BOMB!!!! I've always doubted things about me like who I am and my spirit, soul and God. Now I know their all connected, thanks to this book. I really think everyone should read this book if they want to better themselves as a person. I already feel as though I'm changing as a person. This book will alow you to see the person you could be. I KNOW i'm going to read this book 4 or 5 times just to remind myself of all the possiblites life has.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2012

    Nightclaw

    Blazefoot! Blazefoot! He cheers out with the other cats.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2012

    Smudgepelt

    Yawns stretches

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    !

    I read when I was like nine and loved! I'm nearly 13 now an plan on reading again!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Just the best!

    I'm not a teenager any more but when I read this book! it was amazing. Help me see life as a gift to us.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2004

    Helpful answers

    This was a great book for helping me understand who I am and where I am going.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2011

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    Posted February 8, 2012

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