Fire Power: The British Army: Weapons and Theories of War,1904-1945

Overview

This is, without doubt, the finest book about the crucial role that artillery played in the two World Wars of the Twentieth century. The authors, both former artillery officers who saw action in Word War Two, describe the development of their neglected, inadequate and class-ridden arm through the battles of the First World War and the eventual war-winning role that artillery played, to the culmination of professional military deployment in the Second World War.
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Fire Power: The British Army Weapons & Theories of War 1904-1945

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Overview

This is, without doubt, the finest book about the crucial role that artillery played in the two World Wars of the Twentieth century. The authors, both former artillery officers who saw action in Word War Two, describe the development of their neglected, inadequate and class-ridden arm through the battles of the First World War and the eventual war-winning role that artillery played, to the culmination of professional military deployment in the Second World War.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781844152162
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Books Limited
  • Publication date: 3/28/2005
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2008

    Tough read

    This book is rather esoteric read, and it helps tremendously to have a background of Artillery study or job work. Many basic concepts are left unexplained, and concepts that are imperative to warfare today, like the Time on Target, are only briefly encountered. It also compartmentalizes many different and seemingly unrelated systems as being Artillery-based as well these assertions are based on rather lucid claims that at glance appear reasonable, but subsequent study confounds one's ability to support them. The authors correlate Machine-Guns as being related to Artillery based on three distinct characteristics: ability to cause massive causalities, application of ballistic-based procedures for effective use, and the requirement of well-trained professionals to employ them effectively. This consensus is interesting, but on further study the flaws become apparent in this argument. Artillery men must base ballistic procedures on mathematical facts, while Machine Gunners use line of sight and repetitive aiming procedures oftentimes aided by visual assistance: such as an A-Gunner 'Assistant Gunner'. Furthermore, there is no doubt that Artillerymen must be trained significantly differently, and the plethora of differing jobs within a battery, such as FDC 'Fire Direction Control', Gunner, FO 'Forward Observer', and Radio Operators, are individually unique. On the contrary, Machine-Gunners can oftentimes interchange positions while operating the Gun a battery would be, on the other hand, practically useless if it¿s FDC was annihilated. I believe the authors not only confuse, but detract from the primary material when they discuss tangents such as these. However, the book does deliver its primary message in an effective format that is rather understandable if one perceives and follows the ultimate message, and that each aspect that seems unrelated is cogently fastened to their grand scheme. Fire-Power firmly affords one an ability to inundate himself in Artillery¿s true history, while pondering certain assertions about its nuances.

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