Firefly Atlas of the Universe

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The ultimate reference to the worlds beyond.

The Firefly Guide to the Universe is an encyclopedic examination of the stars, planets, and universe with the latest, most comprehensive information currently available. The book features the latest images from the Hubble Space Telescope which are put into context with clear and detailed text.

In seven extensive sections, the book ...

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Overview

The ultimate reference to the worlds beyond.

The Firefly Guide to the Universe is an encyclopedic examination of the stars, planets, and universe with the latest, most comprehensive information currently available. The book features the latest images from the Hubble Space Telescope which are put into context with clear and detailed text.

In seven extensive sections, the book illustrates and explains:

  • Exploring the Universe: the history and current state of astronomy and space exploration
  • The Solar System: Earth and other planets, mapped and imaged using data from the most recent mission probes
  • The Sun: astrophysical phenomena from sunspots to eclipses
  • The Stars: movements and life cycles, novae and supernovae, black holes, and more
  • The Universe: the origin and nature of the universe, our galaxy, local and remote galaxies, quasars, the question of alien life
  • Star Maps: whole sky maps with 22 alphabetized chapter listings of stars and constellations, and seasonal charts for north and south
  • The Practical Astronomer: Tips for beginner and advanced astronomers including equipment selection and how to build a backyard observatory.

The Firefly Guide to the Universe is a lively and useful reference illustrated with spectacular color photographs and illustrations. It is the ideal guide for discovering the vast richness of the universe.

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Editorial Reviews

Winnipeg Free Press - Erin De Booy
This beautifully developed atlas, with its breathtaking pictures and eye-appealing page layouts, includes everything you ever wanted to know about the universe.
American Reference Books Annual, Volume 35 - Denise Garofalo
Straightforward, but not simplistic, explanations of a wide variety of astronomical objects, including maps and guides to constellations and charts of every mapped body in the solar system.
Booklist / RBB
Each of the two-page overviews packs a great deal of textual and graphical information into its compact format... current accurate, and detailed information on the universe... Highly recommended for most public and academic libraries.
Science News
Moore is particularly adept at presenting the latest advances with clarity... Novice and more-advance amateur astronomers will come away intrigued by and better informed about the night sky.
Knight Ridder Newspapers - Charles Matthews
Illustrated with stunning images.
London Free Press - Jonathan Sher
Our current state of knowledge and uncertainty is captured beautifully in The Firefly Atlas of the Universe... an invaluable and enjoyable tool.
SkyNew - Terence Dickinson
A beautiful, up-to-date oversized volume that is the equivalent of a small astronomy library... a superb visual reference and a fine gift.
Choice - C.S. Dunham
Presents the universe in straightforward fashion, making it easy to find objects in the sky and learn more about them... Recommended. General readers; undergraduates.
The Science Teacher - Rebecca Bell
A superb reference text for all aspects of astronomy... A treasure trove of detailed star maps and unique topographical maps.... personable and accessible.
Halifax Chronicle-Herald - Jodi Delong
Gorgeous new, comprehensive guide... gloriously illustrated... Moore's writing is engaging, and he explains concepts clearly, as well as punctuating the text with intriguing bits of trivia.
Lunar and Planetary Information Bulletin
An encyclopedic examination of the stars, planets, and universe with the latest, most comprehensive information currently available.
Globe and Mail
Impressively organized book covers everything... luminous photographs.
Mercury
A beautiful and informative portrait of the cosmos with superb star maps.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552978191
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/6/2003
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 12.00 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Patrick Moore is the author of 60 books and hosts the BBC-TV series, The Sky at Night.

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Table of Contents

Foreword
by Professor Sir Arnold Wolfendale, FRS

Introduction
by Patrick Moore

EXPLORING THE UNIVERSE
• Astronomy through the Ages
• Telescopes and Stars
• Observatories of the World
• Great Telescopes
• Invisible Astronomy
• Rockets into Space
• Satellites and Space Probes
• Man in Space
• Space Stations
• The Hubble Space Telescope

THE SOLAR SYSTEM
• The Sun's Family
• The Earth in the Solar System
• The Earth as a Planet
• The Earth's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere
• The Earth-Moon System
• Features of the Moon
• Lunar Landscapes
• The Far Side of the Moon

• Missions to the Moon
• Clementine and Prospector
• The Moon: First Quadrant
• The Moon: Second Quadrant
• The Moon: Third Quadrant
• The Moon: Fourth Quadrant
• Movement of the Planets
• Mercury
• Features of Mercury
• Map of Mercury
• Venus
• Mapping Venus
• The Magellan Mission
• Mars
• Missions to Mars
• Satellites of Mars
• Map of Mars
• Hubble Views of Mars
• Mars from Global Surveyor
• The Search for Life on Mars
• The Pathfinder Mission
• Asteroids
• Exceptional Asteroids
• Jupiter
• The Changing Face of Jupiter
• Missions to Jupiter
• Impacts on Jupiter
• Satellites of Jupiter
• The Galilean Satellites — from Galileo
• Maps of Jupiter's Satellites

• Saturn
• Rings of Saturn
• Details of Saturn's Rings
• Missions to Saturn
• Satellites of Saturn
• Maps of Saturn's Icy Satellites
• Titan
• Uranus
• Missions to Uranus
• Satellites of Uranus
• Maps of the Satellites of Uranus
• Neptune
• Satellites of Neptune
• Pluto
• The Surface of Pluto
• Boundaries of the Solar System
• Comets
• Short-period Comets
• Halley's Comet
• Great Comets
• Millennium Comets
• Meteors
• Meteorites
• Meteorite Craters

THE SUN
• Our Star: the Sun
• The Surface of the Sun
• The Solar Spectrum
• Eclipses of the Sun
• The Sun in Action

THE STARS
• Introduction to the Stars
• The Celestial Sphere
• Distances and Movement of the Stars
• Different Types of Stars
• The Lives of the Stars
• Double Stars
• Variable Stars
• Novæ
• Views from the Very Large Telescope

THE UNIVERSE
• The Structure of the Universe
• Our Galaxy
• The Local Group of Galaxies
• The Outer Galaxies
• Quasars
• The Expanding Universe
• The Early Universe
• Life in the Universe

STAR MAPS
• Whole Sky Maps
• Seasonal Charts: North
• Seasonal Charts: South
• Ursa Major, Canes Venatici, Leo Minor
• Ursa Minor, Draco
• Cassiopeia,
Cepheus, Camelopardalis, Lacerta
• Boötes, Corona Borealis, Coma Berenices
• Leo, Cancer, Sextans
• Virgo, Libra
• Hydra, Corvus, Crater
• Lyra, Cygnus, Aquila, Scutum, Sagitta, Vulpecula, Delphinus, Equuleus
• Hercules
• Ophiuchus, Serpens
• Scorpius, Sagittarius, Corona, Australis
• Andromeda, Triangulum, Aries, Perseus
• Pegasus, Pisces
• Capricornus, Aquarius, Piscis, Australis
• Cetus, Eridanus (northern), Fornax
• Orion, Canis Major, Canis Minor, Monoceros, Lepus, Columba
• Taurus, Gemini
• Auriga, Lynx
• Carina, Vela, Pyxis, Antlia, Pictor, Volans, Puppis
• Centaurus, Crux Australis, Triangulum Australe, Circinus, Ara, telescopium, Norma, Lupus
• Grus, Phoenix, Tucana, Pavo, Indus, Microscopium, Sculptor
• Eridanus (southern), Horologium, Cælum, Dorado,
Reticulum, Hydrus, Mensa, Chamæleon, Musca, Apus, Octans

THE PRACTICAL ASTRONOMER
• The Beginner's Guide to the Sky
• Choosing a Telescope
• Home Observatories

Glossary
Index
Acknowledgement

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Preface

Introduction

When I wrote the first edition of The Atlas of the Universe, in 1970, the great astronomical revolution was just beginning. Electronic devices had started to take over from photographic plates, and computers had become a real force even though they were very crude compared to those of today. Space research was in full swing: men had already landed on the Moon, probes had been sent out to the nearer planets, and the first astronomical observatories were in orbit round the Earth.

Since then a great deal has happened. Great new telescopes have been built, allowing us to explore the far reaches of the universe; new theories have forced us to change or even abandon many of the older ideas, even if we have yet to solve fundamental problems such as that of the origins of the universe itself.

The progress of space research has been less smooth. There have been spectacular triumphs, but also some serious setbacks. However, there is one very encouraging note; all nations are working together in space, and the International Space Station now orbiting the Earth really is completely international.

Undoubtedly there will be further problems during the next few decades, but all in all the outlook remains bright. There are still people who question the value of the space programs, but the cost of a planetary probe does not seem excessive when compared to that of, say, a nuclear submarine, and there are many benefits to mankind: for example, medical research is now closely linked with astronautics.

There is a major difference between this Atlas and others. We are used to superb, highly colored images produced by the world's greatest telescopes, but in general the colors are added to help in scientific analysis. Obviously I have included some of these false-colored pictures here, but I have concentrated upon things which can actually be seen by an observer who is adequately equipped. This is not always possible, but I have kept to my rule as far as I can.

Much new information has been obtained since the last edition of the Atlas. For this latest edition, I have made further amendments and additions to bring the text up to date in March 2003.

Patrick Moore

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Introduction

Introduction

When I wrote the first edition of The Atlas of the Universe, in 1970, the great astronomical revolution was just beginning. Electronic devices had started to take over from photographic plates, and computers had become a real force even though they were very crude compared to those of today. Space research was in full swing: men had already landed on the Moon, probes had been sent out to the nearer planets, and the first astronomical observatories were in orbit round the Earth.

Since then a great deal has happened. Great new telescopes have been built, allowing us to explore the far reaches of the universe; new theories have forced us to change or even abandon many of the older ideas, even if we have yet to solve fundamental problems such as that of the origins of the universe itself.

The progress of space research has been less smooth. There have been spectacular triumphs, but also some serious setbacks. However, there is one very encouraging note; all nations are working together in space, and the International Space Station now orbiting the Earth really is completely international.

Undoubtedly there will be further problems during the next few decades, but all in all the outlook remains bright. There are still people who question the value of the space programs, but the cost of a planetary probe does not seem excessive when compared to that of, say, a nuclear submarine, and there are many benefits to mankind: for example, medical research is now closely linked with astronautics.

There is a major difference between this Atlas and others. We are used to superb, highly colored images produced by the world'sgreatest telescopes, but in general the colors are added to help in scientific analysis. Obviously I have included some of these false-colored pictures here, but I have concentrated upon things which can actually be seen by an observer who is adequately equipped. This is not always possible, but I have kept to my rule as far as I can.

Much new information has been obtained since the last edition of the Atlas. For this latest edition, I have made further amendments and additions to bring the text up to date in March 2003.

Patrick Moore

Read More Show Less

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