Firefly Beach [NOOK Book]

Overview

Under the summer sky, anything is possible....

Author of the acclaimed novels Cloud Nine and Follow the Stars Home, Luanne Rice returns with another moving portrait of a family in crisis—as three sisters come face-to-face with the past and find in each other the courage to go on.

Coolly sophisticated and steadfastly single, Caroline Renwick has always been the sister ...
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Firefly Beach

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Overview

Under the summer sky, anything is possible....

Author of the acclaimed novels Cloud Nine and Follow the Stars Home, Luanne Rice returns with another moving portrait of a family in crisis—as three sisters come face-to-face with the past and find in each other the courage to go on.

Coolly sophisticated and steadfastly single, Caroline Renwick has always been the sister everyone could count on. As she and Clea and Skye gathered at Firefly Hill, their childhood home, Caroline thought that they had all put the past behind them. But as summer gets under way, a mysterious man arrives—a man who has the power to bring it all back....

Joe Connor was only six when his father died at Firefly Hill. Though he and Caroline had never met, the five-year-old girl reached out to him. They became pen pals and friends, until a teenaged Joe finally learned the truth about what had happened to his father that night. Now, after years of silence, Joe is suddenly here ... and Caroline still feels a connection. But she can't help but wonder if this handsome man holds the key to her family's healing—or its destruction. And in his presence, how long will she be able to guard her heart?


From the Paperback edition.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
From her first novel to her back-to-back bestsellers, Follow the Stars Home and Dream Country, Luanne Rice has shared compelling, contemporary stories about family ties, the power of secrets, and the gripping realities of life. Firefly Beach is the story of Caroline, Clea, and Skye, three sisters whose special bond has been forged in shared triumphs, secrets, and pain. As they stand poised on the brink of disaster and discovery, they're joined by Joe Conner, a stranger whose childhood is mysteriously entwined with theirs and whose arrival opens the door to a host of new possibilities — from sunken treasure to newfound love. But first they must each face down the tragedies of the past and break down walls built of betrayals in order to discover how and if the scattered pieces of their lives can be made to fit together.
From the Publisher
"Rice brings her signature sensitivity to this beautifully textured summertime read. ... rings with truth and warmth ... a lovely celebration of sisterhood, summer and survival."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Exciting, emotional, terrific. What more could you want?"—The New York Times Book Review

"Luanne Rice proves herself a nimble virtuoso."—Washington Post Book World

"Rice has an elegant style, a sharp eye, and a real warmth. In her hands families, and their values ... seem worth cherishing."—San Francisco Chronicle

"Rice makes us believe that healing is possible."—Chicago Tribune

"Rice's trademarks are fine writing, a good eye for small detail, and an uncanny way of conveying the mysterious glue that holds families together."
-- Kirkus Reviews , starred review

"Luanne Rice touches the deepest, most tender corners of the heart."
-- Tami Hoag, author of Dust to Dust

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553902747
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/27/2006
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 58,726
  • File size: 676 KB

Meet the Author

Luanne Rice
Luanne Rice is the author of twenty-five novels, most recently Last Kiss, Light of the Moon, What Matters Most, The Edge of Winter, Sandcastles, Summer of Roses, Summer’s Child, Beach Girls, and her soon-to-be-released new hardcover, The Letters, written with Joseph Monninger. She lives in New York City and Old Lyme, Connecticut.


From the Paperback edition.

Biography

Luanne Rice is the New York Times- bestselling author who has inspired the devotion of readers everywhere with her moving novels of love and family. She has been hailed by critics for her unique gifts, which have been described as "a beautiful blend of love and humor, with a little magic thrown in."

Rice began her writing career in 1985 with her debut novel Angels All Over Town. Since then, she has gone on to pen a string of heartwarming bestsellers. Several of her books have been adapted for television, including Crazy in Love, Blue Moon, Follow the Stars Home, and Beach Girls.

Rice was born in New Britain, Connecticut, where her father sold typewriters and her mother, a writer and artist, taught English. Throughout her childhood, Rice spent winters in New Britain and summers by Long Island Sound in Old Lyme, where her mother would hold writing workshops for local children. Rice's talent emerged at a very young age, and her first short story was published in American Girl Magazinewhen she was 15.

Rice later attended Connecticut College, but dropped out when her father became very ill. At this point, she knew she wanted to be a writer. Instead of returning to college, Rice took on many odd jobs, including working as a cook and maid for an exalted Rhode Island family, as well as fishing on a scallop boat during winter storms. These life experiences not only cultivated the author's love and talent for writing, but shaped the common backdrops in her novels of family and relationships on the Eastern seaboard. A true storyteller with a unique ability to combine realism and romance, Rice continues to enthrall readers with her luminous stories of life's triumphs and challenges.

Good To Know

Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Luanne:

"I take guitar lessons."

  • "I was queen of the junior prom. Voted in, according to one high school friend I saw recently, as a joke because my date and I were so shy, everyone thought it would be hilarious to see us onstage with crowns on our heads. It was 1972, and the theme of the prom was Color My World. For some reason I told my guitar teacher that story, and he said Yeah, color my world with goat's blood."

  • "I shared a room with both sisters when we were little, and I felt sorry for kids who had their own rooms."

  • "To support myself while writing in the early days, I worked as a maid and cook in one of the mansions in Newport, Rhode Island. I'd learned to love to cook in high school, by taking French cooking from Sister Denise at the convent next door to the school. The family I worked for didn't like French cooking and preferred broiled meat, well done, and frozen vegetables. They were particular about the brand—they liked the kind with the enclosed sauce packet. My grandmother Mim, who'd always lived with us, had taken the ferry from Providence to Newport every weekend during her years working at the hosiery factory, so being in that city made me feel connected to her."

  • "I lived in Paris. The apartment was in the Eighth Arrondissement. Every morning I'd take my dog for a walk to buy the International Herald Tribune and have coffee at a café around the corner. Then I'd go upstairs to the top floor, where I'd converted one of the old servant's rooms into a writing room, and write. For breaks I'd walk along the Seine and study my French lesson. Days of museums, salons du thé, and wandering the city. Living in another country gave me a different perspective on the world. I'm glad I realized there's not just one way to see things.

    While living there, I found out my mother had a brain tumor. She came to Paris to stay with me and have chemotherapy at the American Hospital. She'd never been on a plane before that trip. In spite of her illness, she loved seeing Paris. I took her to London for a week, and as a teacher of English and a lover of Dickens, that was her high point.

    After she died, I returned to France and made a pilgrimage to the Camargue, in the South. It is a mystical landscape of marsh grass, wild bulls, and white horses. It is home to one of the largest nature sanctuaries in the world, and I saw countless species of birds. The town of Stes. Maries de la Mer is inspiring beyond words. Different cultures visit the mysterious Saint Sarah, and the presence of the faithful at the edge of the sea made me feel part of something huge and eternal. And all of it inspired my novel Light of the Moon."

  • "I dedicated a book to Bruce Springsteen. It's The Secret Hour, which at first glance isn't a novel you'd connect with him—the novel is about a woman whose sister might or might not have been taken by a serial killer. I wrote it during a time when I felt under siege, and I used those deeply personal feelings for my fiction. Bruce was touring and I was attending his shows with a good friend. The music and band and Bruce and my friend made me feel somehow accompanied and lightened as I went through that time and reached into those dark places.

    During that period I also wrote two linked books—Summer's Childand Summer of Roses. They deal with the harsh reality of domestic violence and follow The Secret Hour and The Perfect Summer When I look back at those books, that time of my life, I see myself as a brave person. Instead of hiding from painful truths, I tried to explore and bring them to the light through my fiction. During that period, I met amazing women and became involved with trying to help families affected by abuse—in particular, a group near my small town in Connecticut, and Deborah Epstein's domestic violence clinic at Georgetown University Law Center. I learned that emotional abuse leaves no overt outward scars, but wounds deeply, in ways that take a long time to heal. A counselor recommended The Verbally Abusive Relationshipby Patricia Evans. It is life-changing, and I have given it to many women over the years."

  • "I became a vegetarian. I decided that, having been affected by brutality, I wanted only gentleness and peace in my life. Having experienced fear, I knew I could never willingly inflict harm or fear on another creature. All is related. A friend reminds me of a great quote in the Zen tradition: "How you do anything is how you do everything."
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      1. Date of Birth:
        September 25, 1955
      2. Place of Birth:
        New Britain, CT

    Read an Excerpt

    Chapter One


    It was the longest day of the year. The full moon was rising out of the sea. The old dog lay on the grass beside Caroline, his chin resting on folded paws. Caroline, her mother, and her sisters sat in white wicker chairs. The gathering had an edge; family ghosts were circling around.

    Caroline Renwick felt like a matriarch, but she was just the oldest sister. She loved her family. They were strong yet vulnerable, ordinary women who happened to be exceptional. Sometimes she felt she spent too much time with them, shepherding them along like a flock of eccentric sheep. Whenever that happened, she would jump on a plane, go on a business trip. It didn't matter where, as long as it was far enough away to give her mind a rest. But for right now, she was home.

    As the moon rose, it grew smaller and colder, lost its pinkness and became silver. Stirred and panting, Homer raised his head from his paws ... to watch. "Oh, girls," Augusta Renwick said, looking at her three daughters once it was entirely up.

    "Isn't it incredible?" Augusta asked, staring out at Long Island Sound.

    "A full moon on the longest day of the year," said Caroline. "That has to be a good omen."

    "You're always looking for signs," Clea teased. "A full moon, shooting stars..."

    "The North Star," Skye said. "Caroline taught me how to find it the last night I was ever really happy."

    "The last what?" Augusta asked, smiling.

    "Mom ..." Caroline warned.

    "My last happy night," Skye said sadly. She stumbled slightly on the words, making Caroline wonder how much she had already had to drink.

    "You're happy now, darling," Augusta said. "Don't be ridiculous. How can you say something like that?"

    "Easily," Skye said softly, staring at the old dog Homer.

    "Mom..." Caroline started again, racking her brain for something light and conversational.

    "Oh, Skye. Stop now," Augusta said, looking wounded. "We're celebrating the summer solstice! Let's get back to talking about stars...."

    "The North Star..." Clea said, laughing. "I don't need it anymore. If I want to go somewhere, I'll call my travel agent. No more hiking, no more hunting for this girl."

    "Don't need any stars," Skye said.

    "We all need stars," Augusta said. Then she said it again, as if it were very important: "We all need stars."

    "We need cocktails," Skye said. "Isn't it time? The sun's down, the moon's up. There: I've got signs too. It's the cocktail hour. Right, Homer?" The ancient golden retriever thumped his tail.

    "Well, it is," Augusta agreed, checking her small gold watch for added confirmation. She glanced at Caroline and Clea as if she expected them to interfere. Watching her mother, Caroline was reminded of a teenage girl on the brink of doing something her parents would disapprove of, daring them to stop her. Hearing no objections, Augusta walked into the house.

    "Cocktails," Skye said to Homer.

    "Drinking's not the answer," Caroline said. Instead of acting offended, Skye blew her a kiss. After all this time, their roles in life were clear: Skye misbehaved, and Caroline cleaned up.

    Caroline shifted in her chair. She felt an unease deep down, worry mixed with fear. Lately she had been restless, cranky, dissatisfied with her bountiful life. She looked at Skye and saw a person she loved throwing herself away. She had to fight to keep from saying something sharp. For all these years, Caroline had been the glue holding her youngest sister together, and she felt as if Skye might finally be coming undone.

    "Simon's not back, is he?" Clea asked, referring to Skye's scoundrel artist husband. "He's not coming tonight?"

    "No, is Peter?" Skye asked, referring to Clea's husband, a hospital chaplain.

    "No, he took the kids out for pizza," Clea replied.

    "Peter's such a good guy," Caroline said, "wanting a night out with his kids."

    "Caroline, how was your date the other night?" Clea asked.

    "Fine," Caroline said, smiling as she shrugged.

    "Who, that poor investment banker who drove all the way up from New York just to learn he doesn't have a snowball's chance in hell--" Skye began.

    "Okay." Caroline laughed, getting up. "Enough." Thirty-six and never been married. The only Renwick girl never to tie the knot or even come close, she knew her sisters wished they could do something about her die-hard singleness.

    "Seriously," Skye teased, tripping over the "s"'s. "Two hundred miles in his 500SL to find out you don't kiss on the first--"

    "I'll see what Mom's up to," Caroline said, walking away so she wouldn't have to hear how drunk Skye sounded.

    She walked across the wide green lawn into her mother's house. Firefly Hill had been her childhood home. Hugh and Augusta Renwick had named their house on the Connecticut shoreline after Noel Coward's house in Jamaica, because on still June nights like these, when the moon rose out of the Sound, the dark fields around the old Victorian house and the thicket behind the beach below sparked with the green-gold glow of thousands of fireflies. The three sisters would run barefoot through the grass, catching the bugs in cupped hands.

    And they had named it Firefly Hill because Noel Coward, to the Renwick family, meant martinis and conversation, wicked gossip and wit, wild parties and lots to drink -- but never too much until way after dark. Caroline's father had been a famous artist; her mother had celebrated him with legendary parties here in Black Hall, the birthplace of American Impressionism.

    The house smelled like home. Whenever she entered the place, the smell of her childhood was the first thing Caroline noticed. Salt air, wood smoke, oil paint, gin, her mother's perfume, and her father's gun oil all mingled together. She wandered through the cool rooms and couldn't find her mother.

    There, sitting on the wide steps of the side porch, tucked back from her daughters' view, the sea breeze ruffling her mane of white hair, was Augusta Renwick.

    Caroline hesitated in the darkened living room. Even alone, thinking herself unobserved, her mother had such poise, such theatricality. She gazed across the ocean with such intensity, she might have been awaiting her husband's return from a dangerous voyage. Her cheekbones were high and sculpted, her mouth wide and tragic.

    She wore a faded blue shirt and khakis, tattered old sneakers. Around her neck were the black pearls Hugh Renwick had given her ten Christmases before he died. Augusta wore them always; to a party, to a ball, in the garden, to the A&P, it didn't matter. Her black hair had gone white when she was only thirty years old, but she had never dyed it. It was long and luxuriant, halfway down her back. Her eyebrows remained dark. She was still a dramatic beauty.

    "Hi, Mom," Caroline said.

    "Darling," Augusta said, emotional. "I just made the drinks and I was sneaking a quick one. Have one with me before we go back to your sisters."

    "No, thanks."

    Augusta patted the spot beside her. Caroline grabbed a seat cushion off the wicker rocker and placed it on the top step. The martini shaker, condensation clinging to the deep monogram in the sterling silver, rested between them.

    "I was just sitting here, thinking of your father," Augusta said. Shielding her eyes, she looked across the waves, violet and silver in the moonlight. "He loved the June full moon. Didn't he? Couldn't he do a beautiful picture of that sky?"

    "He could, Mom," Caroline said.

    "Here's to Hugh," Augusta said, raising her glass at the moon, "and to the picture he could make of this moment. His wife and his oldest daughter and the longest day of the year. First one of the summer."

    "First one of the summer," Caroline said, raising an imaginary glass.

    "Oh, I miss him."

    "I know you do."

    There was a moment of silence, and Caroline could almost feel her mother waiting for Caroline to say "I do too." Augusta carried an air of sadness and longing around with her, and Caroline knew it had to do with the past, deep love, and missed chances. Hugh had died seven years before, of stomach cancer. As life unfolded, there seemed to be more things they all had to say to him, but he wasn't there to hear them. Her mother had loved him madly till the end.

    Across the Sound, the lighthouses of Long Island had flashed on. To the west, the bright lights of some enormous fishing boat or work platform, moored over the Wickland Shoals, blazed like a small city.

    "Come on," Caroline said, tugging her mother's hand. "Let's go back to the others and watch the moon."

    Her mother left the drink things on the porch steps. Caroline felt relieved. As they crossed the yard, they felt the breeze in their hair. This was the time of day that reminded Caroline of her father more than any other. Her mother was right: She did hold things against him, but that couldn't stop the lump in her throat. Not all the memories were of bad things.

    The fireflies had begun to come out. They twinkled in the rosebushes. They spread across the field, lighting the tall grass like a million candles. The fireflies made their beach magical. They danced down the gently sloping grassy hill, darting through the reeds and spartina above the sandy white strand. No other beaches along the shoreline glowed so intensely. Her father said his girls were special, that the fireflies lit their way and illuminated their beach so they could always find their way home.

    Sometimes he would catch the fireflies and kill them, rubbing their lightning juice across Caroline's cheeks, anointing her with glowing war paint. Or he would pinch them between his big fingers and drop them into his glass, making his martini sparkle with stars, laughing with pleasure as he enchanted his daughters. For so long, Caroline had loved her father more than anything.

    Clea and Skye were silent in their wicker chairs, watching the fireflies. Were they thinking of their father too? It seemed impossible that they weren't. Homer watched Caroline's progress across the yard, head on his paws. As she took her seat, he lifted his white face to kiss her hand. The night felt magical, as if the moon and the past and the ghost of Hugh had cast a spell upon them all. The Renwick women gazed at the moon and listened to the waves.

    "What are you thinking?" Clea asked suddenly, leaning forward to tap Caroline's shoulder.

    "About Dad," Caroline said.

    Skye brooded in the moonlight, seeming to shiver. Their father was buried in the cemetery through the woods on the western edge of Firefly Hill, and Caroline watched Skye's gaze go there now.

    "What are those boats?" Clea asked, pointing at the cluster of lights out by Wickland Shoals. "That's what I'm wondering."

    "They anchored there today," Augusta said. "Two big white boats and a lot of little launches running in and out."

    Leave it to Clea to be thinking something simple, uncomplicated, Caroline thought. She was the happiest Renwick sister, the least encumbered, the only one who had put the past behind her. Caroline gave her a smile. She turned to Skye.

    "How about you?" she asked. "Why are you so quiet, Skye?"

    "Just thinking," Skye said. But of course she would not say what about.

    "We're all together, Caroline," Augusta said. "Let that be enough."

    "I thought someone said something about cocktails," Skye said, rising unsteadily. "Can I get anyone anything?"

    "I don't think so," Augusta said with a sidelong glance at Caroline.

    But when Skye turned to walk precariously across the moonlit lawn, Augusta followed, linking arms with her youngest daughter. Homer rose, as if to follow. He seemed torn. Caroline scratched his ears, and he turned his eloquent eyes to hers. He had always sensed that Skye was the one who needed protection. But his great love was for Caroline, and both of them knew it.

    Duty won. When Skye and Augusta headed up the gentle incline, Homer followed behind with his old head bent and his tail wagging. They disappeared inside the house. Caroline and Clea sat still, waiting. The music started: the tinkle of ice against silver, the complicit laughter, the clink of heavy crystal.



    Unable to sleep that night Caroline turned her head and looked at the framed photo on her bedside table. It showed her, Clea, and Skye, all in summer dresses, at yet another party for their father, when Caroline was about sixteen.

    Sisterhood is amazing. Caroline had known it almost forever, from when she was two, the moment she first realized her mother was growing large. It never ceased to amaze her: She and her sisters came out of the same womb.

    Caroline knew it was the same for sisters everywhere. Whenever she met women who had sisters, she knew they knew. They understood the incredible connection. Staring at the picture, she tried to remember those girls from long ago. Her eyes focused on the image of herself: smiling but guarded, standing slightly behind Clea and Skye, as if to protect them.

    "What were you thinking?" she whispered to her old self, to her younger sisters.

    They grew up in the same house, with the same smells, the same sights, the same sounds. They had the same parents. They shared a room, fell asleep every night to the sound of one another's soft breathing. They shared the same images in dreams. They knew each other's nightmares. Some of their sweetest dreams were of one another.

    "We walked each other to school," she said to herself, to her sisters.

    When she looked at her sisters' bare legs, she knew every single scar. She knew the crescent-moon scar just under Clea's left knee, where she tripped in the night and fell on a piece of broken glass. She knew the inch-long scar on Skye's right ankle, from the time she snagged her foot on barbed wire, cutting through a pasture where none of them were supposed to be.

    She knew the boys they liked. She had teased them about every single one. She helped them write love notes, she dialed boys' phone numbers for them so Clea or Skye could hear that boy answer and then hang up. Sometimes, and she would feel ashamed about this until she died, she flirted with them when her sisters weren't there. She wanted to see whether they liked her better.

    Gazing at the picture, she knew they all had secrets. What about the different experiences, the things they'd never know about each other? They don't tell you everything, Caroline thought. The fights they heard their parents have when she was asleep. The only time in her life she ever cheated, on a math test in seventh grade, even though Caroline had helped her with her homework, she had pretended to "get it" just to please her.


    From the Paperback edition.
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    Interviews & Essays

    Q: In Firefly Beach, you describe the sister relationships as "geometric." What do you mean by that?

    A:
    When I do write books about sisters, I get letters from readers who are sisters, and they tell what it is like for them. This response is so important to me: writing is such a solitary existence in that when I am writing I am alone. And this can be for days and weeks. And of course I am one of three sisters. Firefly Beach is primarily about what happens when the geometry of a relationship changes. In the case of this novel, the change is love—Caroline finds her love again with Joe, and the change in her causes monumental shifts in the relationship with her sisters. Suddenly all this emotional landscape shifts and things come to the surface that have been covered for years and years. As beautiful as the love is for Caroline, the change is frightening and that's a very real thing.

    Q: What makes the sibling connection such a powerful theme in your novels?

    A:
    My first published short story was called "July," and it began with: "When we were young, my sisters and I would sit around and Olivia would say, "We came out of the same body.' It was true, and amazing." That says all, or at least most, of what I feel about the sibling relationship. It's mystical, almost beyond words.

    You come into this world with the same blood, grow up under the same roof, know the words to the same songs, borrow each others' sweaters, make prank calls together, grieve over the same lost pets, race each other to the raft, vie for the attentions of the summer cop, search the tide line at Little Beach for blue sea glass and jingle shells. Agedifferences don't matter, gender doesn't matter, even feuds and estrangements don't matter. As my mother used to say when I was growing up, "You'll have many friends in life, but only two sisters." She was right. And I'll never stop writing about it.
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    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4.5
    ( 28 )
    Rating Distribution

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    (18)

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 22, 2013

      Loved it!

      Great story. Read it originally when it was first published and reread it again a few years later enjoying it just as much as the first time. This book lead me to read many, many more by Ms Rice.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted April 19, 2013

      Couldn't put it down.

      Terrific story, excellently written. Loved it.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted December 23, 2012

      Adnil

      I just finished this amazing book wow! I loved it but now i have to get a tissue because the ending was a real tearjerker

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 23, 2008

      avid reader

      I liked this book a lot. I was a great book on the relationships of mothers, daughters and sisters. Good, fast read.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 3, 2006

      A younger reader, reviwer

      I LOVE THIS BOOK! I dont read that much, but I was asked by my parents to do so. I picked up this book and never could put it down. Now I also love it because I love love stories with mystery and so much more tied in. Its modern but with a twist. If you are on the line between getting it and not, get it, you wont regret it.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 18, 2005

      A new author to love.

      WOW! Great book! A friend loaned me this book and I was very grateful for that. This is the first Luanne Rice book I have read but it was very good and I will definitely read more of hers. The story was wonderful. The characters were well developed and you learn everything about them. They are 'real' people with 'real' issues. It seems good to read about something so real. I would definitely recommend this book. I am glad to find someone new to read, since I have read all my fav authors to date. It is one you won't want to put down.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted April 27, 2005

      MY ALL TIME FAVORITE BOOK EVER!!!

      This was absolutely my favorite book of all time ~ Luanne Rice has a way of making you part of her stories once again. I really enjoy the fact that she refers to some of the characters from this book in some of her more recent ones.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted February 7, 2005

      Great Book

      Great book, I loved it, gave it to 3 friends who read it and loved it too. Buy it!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 14, 2003

      great

      This book rocks like so many of her others do. I loved the characters and how she made them seem so real and alive! Make time for it this summer.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted August 14, 2002

      I love this author

      I loved this book and I love this author. I have gone out and purchased all her books to read. Can't wait to get started on the next one.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 20, 2002

      one of the bests

      i absoultly love this book, it is one of my favs. the love story was just so sweet and made you want to read more until you were finished with the book, i couldnt put it down, i felt like i knew all of the characters and thats what i liked about the book the most

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 10, 2002

      Another Great Love Story!

      Firefly Beach by Luanne Rice is one of her best books yet. I have read all but three of her books, and with each new book I read, I come to endear Rice as one of my favorite authors. Her books are incredibly sensitive, the characters are so real and believable, and she writes from her heart. Her writings seem to center on family issues that one can relate to at one time or another. Rice lets us know that love can heal, prevail and make things right. Caroline Renwick knows the secret of Joe Connor's father's untimely death when he was only six. Yet Caroline befriends him at a young age and their relationship grows deeper through their letters to each other. That is, until Joe discovers the truth of his father's death, and at seventeen and blames Caroline for not telling him the truth, and cuts her out of his life. Years later, Joe comes back into Caroline's life, back to Firefly beach to see for himself where the death occurred, and to find some more answers. Now a grown woman, Caroline, remains the main support for her mother and two sisters, as they all must confront those demons and deal with them, as well as the arrival of Joe Connor. With grace and style, Luanne Rice portrays a dysfunctional family whose yearnings to heal are marred by more challenges and confrontations. With Joe's help, Caroline is able to listen to her heart and to her longings and in the process helps her own family to find the strength to heal and to love again. This was another could not put down book, and Ms. Rice writes with the same sensitivity that I have come to admire in her previous books. A very endearing love story - I highly recommend it!

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    • Anonymous

      Posted October 26, 2001

      Boring and Depressing

      This book is full of violence and cheap romance. It is so boring I didn't even finish reading it (which is VERY rare with me). I don't recommend it!

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted November 16, 2001

      Summer Read? Summer will be over by the time you finish it!

      This novel was a little slow and boring at first but when the romance started it became a lot more interesting. My final opinion of the book was that while it held my attention enough to finsh it, it had a little too much drama.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 17, 2001

      Great summer read

      Firefly Beach is a great summer read for the beach. It kept my interest from the time I turned the first page. I recommended it to three of my friends already.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 30, 2001

      A Great Summertime Escape!

      I found Firefly Beach a warm and exciting. If you love the ocean, art, family,suspense romance and of course fireflies, you will find it in this book. I think the relationship of the sisters was beautiful and true to life in many ways. L.White

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 2, 2001

      a great heart warming summer read

      I found this one of Luanne Rice's best books yet. It was a real page turner. I enjoyed the bonding between 3 sisters. This story made me want a sister. You will really enjoy this book.

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    • Posted December 9, 2008

      more from this reviewer

      powerful look at the aftermath of a tragedy

      In 1969 at FIREFLY BEACH, Connor arrives at the Renwick home carrying a gun. He accuses the famous artist Hugh Renwick of stealing his wife and plans to steal something that the man loves. However, Renwick is not at home and Connor is unable to kill any of the three Renwick sisters as he had planned. Instead he kills himself. Five-year old Caroline Renwick begins exchanging letters with Connor¿s six-year-old son Joe, but those letters end years later when he learns his dad committed suicide rather than dying from a heart attack. <P> Over three decades later, Joe returns to FIREFLY BEACH to meet the Renwicks and gain closure. Instead, he finds the Renwicks needing emotional help too. He helps one sister dry out, but opens his heart to the vulnerable, caring Caroline as love blossoms between them. However, that tragedy thirty plus years ago still nightmarishly lingers as a blockage to any permanent relationship between Caroline and Joe. <P> FIREFLY BEACH is a powerful look at how one tragic event impacts on innocent family members. Three decades after their father had an affair with his mother; all four now adult children and the girls¿ mother still are psychologically damaged. Luanne Rice escorts the audience inside the heads of her cast so the reader can feel the swirling often-dark emotions that threaten to engulf each character. Ms. Rice is among the top gurus in invoking a realistic healing power of love in her novels and this novel showcases the author at her holistic best. <P>Harriet Klausner

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 17, 2012

      No text was provided for this review.

    • Anonymous

      Posted December 20, 2009

      No text was provided for this review.

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