First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival

First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival

4.3 20
by Ken Wheaton
     
 

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Welcome to Grand Prairie, Louisiana—land of confounding accents, hard-drinking senior citizens, and charming sinners—brought to hilarious life in a bracing, heartfelt debut novel simmering with Cajun spice. . .

Father Steve Sibille has come home to the bayou to take charge of St. Pete's church. Among his challenges are teenybopper altar girls,

Overview

Welcome to Grand Prairie, Louisiana—land of confounding accents, hard-drinking senior citizens, and charming sinners—brought to hilarious life in a bracing, heartfelt debut novel simmering with Cajun spice. . .

Father Steve Sibille has come home to the bayou to take charge of St. Pete's church. Among his challenges are teenybopper altar girls, insomnia-curing confessions, and alarmingly alluring congregant Vicky Carrier. Then there's Miss Rita, an irrepressible centenarian with a taste for whiskey, cracklins, and sticking her nose in other people's business.

When an outsider threatens to poach Father Steve's flock, Miss Rita suggests he fight back by staging an event that will keep St. Pete's parishioners loyal forever. As The First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival draws near, help comes from the strangest places. And while the road to the festival may be paved with good intentions—not to mention bake sales, an elephant, and the most bizarre cook-out ever—where it will lead is anyone's guess. . .

"A sparkling debut."

—Luis Alberto Urrea, author of Queen of America

"Delightful. . .Wheaton writes with an infectious energy, and his affection for the characters and culture is authentic."

Publishers Weekly

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Authentic Cajun touches (and recipes) spice up Wheaton's delightful debut yarn about faith and the yearnings of the flesh. Fr. Steve Sibille, the reflective protagonist, is re-evaluating his vow of celibacy after being tempted by Vicky Carrier, the sinfully conceived but beloved daughter of St. Peter's church's former padre. Father Steve considers the repeated advice of his family friend Miss Rita, a scene-stealing African-American centenarian who tells Father Steve that what he needs is a woman. Things get stickier for Father Steve when his gay friend, Fr. Mark Johnson, quits the priesthood and the Rev. Paul Tompkins attempts to woo St. Pete congregants to his Pentecostal church, leading to a big showdown and the festival of the title. Wheaton writes with an infectious energy, and his affection for the characters and culture is authentic without being overbearing or cheesy. Do the bon temps rouler? In Wheaton's hands, they sure do. (Jan.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780758238528
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
01/01/2010
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

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First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book with some very colorful language.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a practicing Catholic I wasn't sure what to expect from Ken Wheaton's novel. Would I be shocked? Offended? Amused? Turns out it was all of the above. This was a pleasure to read and I can't wait to read more of Wheaton's work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A joy to read.
Yzzy More than 1 year ago
That book had me laughing and chuckling the whole time. It is irreverent and funny as can be. Some people who have posted reviews have a problem with the "profanities". I don't. Really, when you stop and think about it, that's how most normal well adjusted adults talk. You say a curse word here and there and life goes on. Grow up! The story is cute and some characters could have been developed a little bit more but the whole point of the book was to keep you reading and...it did just that. I'm sorry it was so short. I would have liked that book to be never ending I liked it so much. The recipes at the end seem yummy. I'm definitely going to try the crawfish etoufee. If you want something lighthearted and funny with a definite southern twang, this is it!
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neworleanslady1 More than 1 year ago
Ken's book is great from the introduction to the recipes at the end of the book. The book is a funny and entertaining look at life in South Louisiana from a Louisiana native. I laughed out loud as I heard phrases straight out of my childhood.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Carspar289 More than 1 year ago
i did not like this book. it was disturbing in the sense of what the priest does, thinks and talks about. he was creepy. story line was good but characters were very disturbing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story is really good, but I had trouble getting past all the profane language. I'm not sure it added anything positive to what could be a great book club review. However, I would never suggest it to either of my book clubs.
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Tatute More than 1 year ago
Headline says it all!