First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower, An Intimate Portrait of the Women Who Shaped America [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Legacies and Personalities that built the White House

As a young nation grew into its own, it was not just the presidents who led the way. The remarkable women of the White House, often neglected by history, had a heavy hand in the shaping of America. The earliest First Ladies of the United States left countless untold legacies behind after their role at the White House was over.

Decidedly different from their modern day counterparts, the ...

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First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower, An Intimate Portrait of the Women Who Shaped America

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Overview

The Legacies and Personalities that built the White House

As a young nation grew into its own, it was not just the presidents who led the way. The remarkable women of the White House, often neglected by history, had a heavy hand in the shaping of America. The earliest First Ladies of the United States left countless untold legacies behind after their role at the White House was over.

Decidedly different from their modern day counterparts, the nation's first presidential wives made their impact not in terms of political policy or broad social and civic service, but instead with unique, personal, and often long-lasting accomplishments.

Read the unforgettable stories of how:

Martha Washington set the tone for First Ladies and walked the fine line between royal pretention and republican accessibility.

Sarah Polk worked diligently, constantly giving the high office her utmost attention.

Julia Grant not only adapted to the ups and downs of her husband's political career, but flourished wherever she landed.

And it was Nellie Taft's ambition that ultimately led her husband to the presidency.

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Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
A delightful, valuable book, which I would recommend to anyone who enjoys a good read and wishes to learn about important relatively neglected contributors to American history.
Bookworm Sez
The First Ladies is the kind of book that will satisfy historians, women's history scholars and trivia buffs alike. If that's you, then see that you get this book.
Book News
An independent presidential historian presents profiles of the 26 First Ladies who occupied the US White House from 1789-1961, from Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower. The book features cameo photos, and comments about their legacies for more recent First Ladies. Lesser-known ones are given credit for their contributions; e.g., Julia Tyler is compared to Jackie Kennedy as a style-setter.
From the Publisher
"A delightful, valuable book, which I would recommend to anyone who enjoys a good read and wishes to learn about important relatively neglected contributors to American history." - Midwest Book Review

"The First Ladies" is the kind of book that will satisfy historians, women's history scholars and trivia buffs alike. If that's you, then see that you get this book." - Bookworm Sez

"An independent presidential historian presents profiles of the 26 First Ladies who occupied the US White House from 1789-1961, from Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower. The book features cameo photos, and comments about their legacies for more recent First Ladies. Lesser-known ones are given credit for their contributions; e.g., Julia Tyler is compared to Jackie Kennedy as a style-setter." - Book News

"By highlighting personality traits and the activities of these women leading up to, during, and post their White House days, Foster gives a perspective of the first ladies not often seen in the press or history books. Her audiences like her because she has a light style of writing that is full of information and you learn what the First Ladies are like as people and not just a series of facts." - Charlotte Area News Stories

" An Intimate Portrait of the Women Who Shaped America has written a delightful, valuable book, which I would recommend to anyone who enjoys a good read and wishes to learn about important relatively neglected contributors to American history." - Midwest Book Review

"Feather Schwartz Foster's guide to the Founding Mothers isn't just a list of people and their details, but a chance to delve into the little-known lives of the presidents' wives: their personalities, their passions, their accomplishments, and their legacies...Recommended for everyone who wants a peak into the lives of the White House's first wives. " - The Paperback Pursuer

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402254802
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 379,254
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Researching the subject for more than 40 years, Feather Schwartz Foster has given more than 200 lectures about the women whose marriages are included in the book, including the Christopher Wren Society in Williamsburg, Virginia. She also is a "Resident Guest" at the President's Park in Williamsburg.

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Read an Excerpt

Martha Washington
1731-1802
First Lady: 1789-97
The Domestic Lady W.

It has been said that the best political decision George Washington ever made was to marry the Widow Custis. He was a Virginia militia colonel seeking a career change. Efforts for a commission in the regular British army had been consistently thwarted. Washington determined to focus his attentions on the estate he had inherited from his half brother, but in order to make his Mount Vernon plantation the envy of Fairfax County, he needed an appropriate consort. And it was time. He was twenty-six.

Martha Dandridge Custis was the daughter of well-to-do Virginia gentry on a social and economic par with the Washingtons. Her academic education was modest. She could read, write, and do sufficient arithmetic to manage the household accounts. At seventeen, she married into the wealthy Custis family and was widowed at twenty-six, left with two small children (four and two years old), and one huge estate (more than twenty thousand fertile acres, two hundred slaves, and the scarcest commodity among land-poor planters: a substantial amount of cash). Remarriage was her best option, and Martha required a mate with sufficient property of his own, since she was understandably wary of fortune hunters. She also required someone who would be a kind stepfather and honest manager for her children's sizable inheritance. Both of them made fortunate choices for a happy and successful marriage.

Martha was the consummate colonial mistress and hostess, reasonably cultured, and superbly skilled at household management. It would fall to her to supervise the numerous slaves and cottage industries that accounted for a successful plantation. She sewed beautifully, danced the minuet gracefully, was said to set the finest table in northern Virginia. Her kitchen and recipe collection was the envy of her neighbors. She boasted a medical box with all the proper herbs and remedies the eighteenth century could provide, and she took pride and pleasure in caring for others.

The Custis wealth helped to assure Washington a seat in the House of Burgesses, a responsibility he accepted with the usual eighteenth-century noblesse oblige. Within ten years of their marriage, Washington had increased his own holdings to include acreage as far west as the Ohio Valley. Mount Vernon had been renovated and enlarged. Most important, he had established and engaged more than a dozen tenant farmers and craftsmen to provide mills, shipbuilding facilities, a fishing fleet, spinners, and weavers for his ever-growing conglomerate of industries. The Washingtons had become extremely wealthy, thanks to his shrewd business instincts, but they seldom dined alone. Their home was a mecca for friends and neighbors, relations on both sides, and weary travelers. No one was turned away. Their hospitality was known throughout the colony.

At the onset of the American Revolution, both George and Martha were forty-three, which was considered well into middle age. War in the eighteenth century was primarily a seasonal affair: spring, summer, and fall. In the winter, armies usually went into winter quarters, and Martha Washington would travel from Mount Vernon with her medicine box and knitting needles to meet her husband wherever he was encamped. She had never before ventured beyond Virginia's borders. The exacting general, who was always hard-pressed to maintain his ragtag army, heartily welcomed Mrs. W. and whatever supplies she could bring, which were a godsend. She immediately took charge of seeing to the general's personal comfort, supervising the officers' kitchens, and organizing other officers' wives to sew, knit, scrape lint for bandages, and make themselves useful. Above all, she had her medicine box for tending the sick and wounded. Come spring, she went home and the war continued.

It would be seven years before Private Citizen and Mrs. Washington could be together again in their beloved Virginia home. Their idyll would not last long. Politics would take center stage in the new nation, and Washington was considered the indispensable man with a new title: president of the United States. There had never been anything like it before. How would he and Lady Washington behave in this new office? It was virgin territory. Every known political paradigm was based on royalty or quasi royalty, and this had been so for nearly two thousand years. There was no precedent for a republic on the scale of the tiny United States on the vast continent of America. How would they chart the course for generations to come?

Lady W. (some honorific was needed, and aristocratic titles were verboten) was nearly sixty and not about to change her ways-certainly not willingly. She continued to dress in the same simple fashions she had worn for decades and determined to remain refined and dignified. But she had a serious predicament. Her elevation in social stature as the premier woman in the country precluded her traditional Virginia hospitality. She could not appear aloof and remote, since it would smack of monarchial tendencies. But neither could she be warm and welcoming, as was her nature. It would suggest an unbecoming familiarity for a head of state. After a lifetime of full houses and of exchanging frequent visits with friends and family, the new protocol made her feel isolated. Some middle ground had to be met. But how?

She was happy, of course, to open the presidential home in New York and later in Philadelphia (rented in both cases) for entertaining. Political dinners for President Washington were usually stag affairs. Martha would plan and supervise, but she did not attend. Instead, she instituted regular drawing room levees, inviting carefully selected guests for carefully prepared entertainments, trying to tiptoe that fine line required for a republican court. People were contemptuous of royal trappings, but they definitely wanted some glitz. Martha was decorous but not glitzy. Obviously she could not please everyone. The criticism in society, in the political world, and in the press annoyed her.

Having tirelessly devoted themselves to the welfare of their country, valuing honorable conduct above all else, both Washingtons were notably thin-skinned and sensitive to public reproach for their behavior, which they believed to be estimable at all times. Martha resented being watched by the colonial paparazzi and criticized at every turn. Where did she go? What did she wear? Whom did she speak to? Which carriage did she use? Why did she sit on a slightly raised platform at her receptions? What did all this mean? It rankled her to no end, so she chose to go out as seldom as possible, pining for the time she could return to Mount Vernon and their own vine and fig tree.

It was a difficult line to walk, and both Washingtons were more than happy to finally relinquish the power, the glory, and the comments. For the first time in twenty years, they could sit down to dinner by themselves.

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Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgments                                   ix
Martha Washington (1731-1802): The Domestic Lady W   1
Abigail Adams (1744-1818): John's Wife               7
Dolley Madison (1768-1849): The Magnificent       15
Louisa Adams (1775-1852): The Shadow Lady          21
Rachel Jackson (1767-1828): Her Sacred Name        27
Julia Tyler (1820-89): The Rose of Long Island         33
Sarah Polk (1803-91): Sarah, Straight and Strong        39
Three Reclusives and Miss Lane                45
Mary Lincoln (1818-82): The Born Diva              55
Julia Grant (1826-1902): Rock Solid to the Core        63
Lucy Hayes (1831-89): The Old-Fashioned New Woman  69
Frances Cleveland (1864-1947): A Star Is Born       75
Caroline Harrison (1832-92): Alias Martha Stewart    83
Edith Roosevelt (1861-1948):
The Elegant White House                            89
Nellie Taft (1861-1943): The Wind Beneath           95
Ellen Wilson (1860-1914): The Steel Magnolia        103
Edith Wilson (1872-1961): Dragon Lady             109
Florence Harding (1860-1924): Duchess          117
Grace Coolidge (1879-1957): Bountiful Graces       125
Lou Hoover (1874-1944): The Unsung Hero           131
Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962):
The Incomparable Mrs. R                            139
Bess Truman (1885-1982): Reluctant Lady            145
Mamie Eisenhower (1896-1979):
The Grandma Next Door                            151
Author's Note                                     159
Bibliography                                       163
About the Author                              177

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 10, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Intriguing Lives of the First Wives!

    Description:

    The First Ladies is a brief, yet intriguing portrait of the remarkable women behind our presidents, and the sacrifices they made for our beloved country - the U.S. of A. From Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower, Feather Schwartz Foster takes readers on an entertaining, fascinating, and humorous journey through the lives, loves, and personalities of our often overlooked Founding Mothers.

    Review:

    My parents have always instilled in my siblings and I that history is important, especially the history of our family and of our great country. So when I saw The First Ladies up for review, I grabbed at the opportunity to learn more about the women of the White House. I have taken numerous classes throughout high school and college detailing U.S. government, U.S. history, and democracy, but I have honestly never taken a class where the U.S. Presidents' wives were discussed, or even considered important in our history; and I find that to be a travesty. The only two wives I remember hearing about were Martha Washington and Eleanor Roosevelt, and it was pretty much just said in passing. But now I know so much more! Feather Schwartz Foster's guide to the Founding Mothers isn't just a list of people and their details, but a chance to delve into the little-known lives of the presidents' wives: their personalities, their passions, their accomplishments, and their legacies. The writing style is succinct, yet full of fun and surprising facts; Did you know that William Taft would have never become president if his wife Nellie "forced" him to run? I didn't. Now that I know these things, I would love to read more about them - "The Old Gals". Overall, a wonderfully entertaining read that will leave the reader smiling and inspired. Recommended for everyone who wants a peak into the lives of the White House's first wives.

    Rating: On the Run (4/5)

    *** I received this book from the author in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 28, 2011

    An Absolute Must Have

    The First Ladies
    The First Ladies by Feather Foster Schwartz offers a brief view of the First Ladies of the Presidency of the United States from Martha Washington to Mamie Eisenhower, the last of the First Ladies born in the nineteenth century.

    The First Ladies take a brief, but fascinating look into the disposition, life and a contribution each First Lady brought to her husband's presidency. It looks at which First Ladies eagerly took up the office as well as those who were reluctant or who refused to take it up. It looks very briefly at the relationship the President had with his wife - was she a confidant, a helper or simply a good example of the average woman of her time. What did she bring to the proverbial table at the time her husband took up the office of President of the United States?

    I greatly enjoyed The First Ladies. It wasn't a book of dry historical facts but rather a glimpse into the life and personality of each woman. I found it fascinating. It was as if I stepped briefly into each woman's life and understood, to a very small degree not only what she brought to the Presidency, but also what the Presidency brought to her. Was it a joy, a challenge to rise to, or an unwanted and unwelcomed burden? The First Ladies examines women who looked at the job of wife of a President in all these ways and it makes them more accessible and understandable. I think it is a wonderful example of scholarship, without being dry or boring and would make an excellent addition to any home or library.

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  • Posted April 14, 2011

    Interesting and fun!

    Learned more then i thought i would and an easy read. Give this a try you will not regret, history buffs will rave.

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    Posted August 21, 2011

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    Posted May 9, 2011

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    Posted March 13, 2011

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