First Light (Brady Coyne/J. W. Jackson Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

When two acclaimed crime novelists and fishing buddies, Philip R. Craig and William G. Tapply, join their remarkable talents, it's the best of both worlds for readers of the first ever Brady Coyne/J. W. Jackson mystery.
It's September on Martha's Vineyard, and J.W. is contemplating the serious matter of a tree house for his children and some good fishing in the annual striped bass and bluefish derby with his friend, Boston lawyer Brady Coyne, who'll be on the island to help the...
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First Light (Brady Coyne/J. W. Jackson Series #1)

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Overview

When two acclaimed crime novelists and fishing buddies, Philip R. Craig and William G. Tapply, join their remarkable talents, it's the best of both worlds for readers of the first ever Brady Coyne/J. W. Jackson mystery.
It's September on Martha's Vineyard, and J.W. is contemplating the serious matter of a tree house for his children and some good fishing in the annual striped bass and bluefish derby with his friend, Boston lawyer Brady Coyne, who'll be on the island to help the elderly Sarah Fairchild write her will. J.W. has a little business, too, having reluctantly agreed to spend some of his valuable surf casting time trying to find a missing woman named Katherine Bannerman, who was last seen on the island a year ago.
For Brady and J.W. it'll be law and detecting during the day, but by night they will roam the far Vineyard beaches in search of prizewinning catches.
But soon another woman goes missing, a local bully threatens both Brady and J.W., and Brady discovers that more than a few people desperately crave his client's estate. With two hundred acres of pristine Vineyard land in a frail, elderly woman's control, the stakes are high.
For J.W., his case gets personal when someone slashes his wife's tires. As J.W. prowls the Vineyard's villages in search of the slasher and the two missing women and Brady defends his client's interests against an array of warring factions, the two friends come to suspect that a killer is loose on the island. What they do not know is that they themselves will soon be in danger. People are not always what they seem, and there are snakes under the rocks, even in Eden.
By turns charming and suspenseful, contemporary and evocative, First Light could only have been imagined in the collective mind of these two superb authors.
Includes three recipes.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
It's summer on Martha's Vineyard, but the living isn't easy when Brady Coyne and J. W. Jackson team up to ferret out a killer.
Publishers Weekly
Two veteran writers who know Martha's Vineyard well bring together Boston lawyer Brady Coyne and former cop J.W. Jackson in a slow-paced but ultimately satisfying crime drama set on the island after the summer season has ended. When tough businessman Jack Bannerman's wife goes missing, he hires private detective Jackson to find her. A parallel missing person's case develops when Coyne, Jackson's buddy, arrives for a fishing derby, only to see his elderly client Sarah Fairchild's private nurse vanish mysteriously in the midst of a nasty dispute over the future of ailing Mrs. Fairchild's sizable beachfront property. Conflicts erupt as family members fight among themselves and developers clash with environmentalists, all over whether to have a golf club or wildlife preserve. When he finally speaks with the bumbling local police, Jackson has already noticed that attractive women, all blonde and in their forties, have been disappearing for years on the island. Slashed tires with a warning note and quotations from Hamlet become important clues that eventually lead the pair of sleuths to a culprit whose guilt has been amply foreshadowed. The first-person narration that alternates between the two heroes for 26 chapters would have benefited from some variety, while the long descriptions of surf casting at morning's "first light" will appeal mostly to those who enjoy that sport. Yet we do get an intriguing and evocative picture of this high-profile vacation spot (whose presidential visits are noted in the text) in the off-season. (Jan. 8) Forecast: This collaborative effort ought to boost sales for both authors, especially if the two Massachusetts residents can coordinate on some joint local publicity and promotion. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Two veteran writers who know Martha's Vineyard well bring together Boston lawyer Brady Coyne and former cop J.W. Jackson in a slow-paced but ultimately satisfying crime drama set on the island after the summer season has ended. When tough businessman Jack Bannerman's wife goes missing, he hires private detective Jackson to find her. A parallel missing person's case develops when Coyne, Jackson's buddy, arrives for a fishing derby, only to see his elderly client Sarah Fairchild's private nurse vanish mysteriously in the midst of a nasty dispute over the future of ailing Mrs. Fairchild's sizable beachfront property. Conflicts erupt as family members fight among themselves and developers clash with environmentalists, all over whether to have a golf club or wildlife preserve. When he finally speaks with the bumbling local police, Jackson has already noticed that attractive women, all blonde and in their forties, have been disappearing for years on the island. Slashed tires with a warning note and quotations from Hamlet become important clues that eventually lead the pair of sleuths to a culprit whose guilt has been amply foreshadowed. The first-person narration that alternates between the two heroes for 26 chapters would have benefited from some variety, while the long descriptions of surf casting at morning's "first light" will appeal mostly to those who enjoy that sport. Yet we do get an intriguing and evocative picture of this high-profile vacation spot (whose presidential visits are noted in the text) in the off-season. (Jan. 8) Forecast: This collaborative effort ought to boost sales for both authors, especially if the two Massachusetts residents can coordinate on some joint local publicity and promotion. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
While in Martha's Vineyard on legal business, Tapply's Brady Coyne (Past Tense) visits Craig's J.W. Jackson (Vineyard Shadows). Coyne gets caught in the crossfire between land developers and the heirs of an old lady, while Jackson searches for a missing woman. The two eventually join forces, of course, in a most captivating read. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Mystery veterans Craig (A Fatal Vineyard Season, 1999, etc.) and Tapply (Muscle Memory, 1999, etc.) present their inaugural collaboration in alternating first-person narratives. The setting is Martha's Vineyard, home of Craig's fisherman/sleuth J.W. Jackson-and of distraught husband James Bannerman, who seeks help locating his missing wife, Katherine. Luckily, Tapply's lawyer/sleuth Brady Coyne is driving down from Boston to hang out with J.W. and his family and to wrap up the will of wealthy, dying matriarch Sarah Fairchild. Sarah's children Nate and Eliza (Eliza's a former flame of Brady's) are both self-destructive and unlucky in love; only Eliza's handsome son Patrick seems to have his head on his shoulders. J.W. is less interested in investigating than in fishing with his wife Zee, his kids, and his old pal Brady. The less retiring Brady finds himself in the middle of a battle between developers and environmentalists, both with designs on Sarah's estate. Assuming that Brady needs still more stimulation, Zee fixes him up with Sarah's nurse, pretty Molly Wood. When the reliable Molly doesn't show up for her date, Zee senses foul play. Comparing notes, Brady and J.W. find several similarities between Katherine and Molly, who are both blond, attractive, and 40-ish. Retracing the final days of the two women reveals common ground that leads to the surprising killer. Lively banter and a narrative brimming with mischief make this maiden voyage entertaining from start to stop. But the mystery barely raises interest, even among the detectives.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743234849
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 1/19/2002
  • Series: Brady Coyne/J. W. Jackson Series, #1
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 315,889
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

The late Philip R. Craig was the author of nineteen novels in the Martha's Vineyard Mystery series. A professor emeritus of English at Wheelock College in Boston, he loved the Vineyard and lived there year-round with his wife, Shirley.
William G. Tapply is professor of English at Clark University. The author of twenty-one Brady Coyne novels and ten books about fly-fishing and the outdoors, he is also a columnist for American Angler magazine and a contributing editor for several other outdoors publications. He lives with his wife, novelist Vicki Stiefel, in Hancock, New Hampshire.
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Read an Excerpt


Chapter One: J.W.

I had arranged to meet James Bannerman in the Fireside because it was close to the ferry landing, so he could catch the boat and go home to Connecticut after we talked. I was the only customer when he came in. He was a medium-sized guy in his mid-forties. He had flat, dark eyes and hair, and he looked in shape. He wore white-collar clothes. He glanced around, saw only me and the bartender and Bonzo wiping tables in the corner of the room. He came over to the bar.

"Are you Jackson?"

"My friends call me J.W."

The bartender drifted down while Bannerman and I were shaking hands. Bannerman pointed at my glass of Sam Adams. "Bring a couple more of those to us over in that booth, please." The "please" softened it, but it was clear that Bannerman was used to giving orders.

Bannerman and I went to the booth. He shoved a photograph at me. "That's her. That's my wife, my Katherine."

The photo was of an attractive blonde woman about my age, which made her only a few years younger than Bannerman. I drank from my glass. "Look," I said, "I'm only here because Jason Thornberry asked me to meet you. We've worked together a couple of times before, but like I told him on the phone, I don't think I'm the right man for this job. Your wife is legally separated from you, so where she goes and what she does is her own business."

"Don't say that. I'm desperate. Thornberry's people finally managed to trace her this far last year, but then they lost her. She was here on the Vineyard, but then she dropped out of sight just before Labor Day. I've been here several times this summer, trying to find her, but my work won't let me stay long. You're my last chance."

"You really need a professional. I haven't been a cop for years. I'm retired. If you don't think Thornberry Security can do the job, you should hire some other private investigator, but I think Thornberry is about as good an outfit as you'll find."

"Money's no problem, if that's what's holding you back. I've got plenty. And I don't need some other PI, I need you. Thornberry himself recommended you. He said he's been trying for years to get you to work for him, but you won't. He says you live here, you know the people, and you know this island. He says local knowledge might make the difference. Don't let me down. Please. I love Katherine. I have to find her!"

He dug out a handkerchief and wiped his face. I let myself feel sorry for him and looked at the photo again. He mentioned a sum of money that was large enough to capture my attention. When you live on Martha's Vineyard and don't have a regular job, you always need money.

"Maybe she's still here on the Vineyard," he said. "We honeymooned here, and she loved the place. I think that's why she came back here. Maybe she's living here, using another name. If she is, I want you to find her. If she's gone, find out where she went. Please."

Bannerman was a tough-looking man, but he wasn't acting tough at all. He looked like he wanted to cry. I wondered if he was an amateur thespian, pulling my strings, or if he was one of those people who fool themselves about their own virtue, or if he was really as concerned as he was acting. I had no real reason to think it wasn't the latter.

I thought of the things I was planning to do. Fishing in the annual Derby was highest on the list. I was tired of being the only surf caster on Martha's Vineyard who had never caught a forty-pound bass.

"Look," said Bannerman, leaning forward, "if Katherine doesn't want to see me, that's fine. All I really want to know is that she's well and happy. I love her. Frankie, that's our daughter, loves her. Kathy's the most important thing in the world to us. Please help me."

His words were consistent with feelings I also had. I was in love with my wife. If Zee ever left me, I'd be miserable, but I'd want her to be happy.

"Please," said Bannerman for the fourth or fifth time.

I didn't want the job, but unlike Sam Spade I was a sap when it came to love or its appearance.

"All right," I said. "I'll see what I can do. But don't get your hopes up. If Thornberry Security can't find her, the chances are that I can't either. And a couple of other things. I can't spend all of my time on this job. I have other commitments. And if I do find her, it'll be up to her whether or not I tell you where she is. I'll tell you if I find her, but I may not tell you where."

"Thank you," said Bannerman. "I appreciate your help more than I can say." He wiped his face again and put the handkerchief away. I poured more beer into my glass and drank it. It was cool and smooth.

"Here," said Bannerman, who had been digging in his briefcase. He put a checkbook on the table and handed me a large envelope. "In there you'll find all of the information I gave Thornberry when they went to work for me and all that they've given me since. Maybe there's something there that will help you. If you need to know more, let me know, and I'll tell you what I can." While I pulled a file from the envelope and glanced at it, he scribbled a check and pushed it at me. It was too much, but if that was fine with him, it was fine with me, so I didn't make an issue of it.

"I'll look at this later," I said, pushing the file back into its envelope, "but you can tell me some things right now. First, why did she leave?"

He'd heard the question before, probably from both his local police and certainly from Thornberry, since detectives in both agencies would understand that husbands usually know why their wives disappear.

"I honestly don't know," he said, looking me right in the eye. "We had our ups and downs like everybody else, but nothing serious. Then one morning after I went to the office, she just drove away from our house there in Hartford and I haven't seen her since. The neighbors saw her go. She was alone. That was a year ago last spring. I've been looking for her ever since, but all I've found out is that she was here on the Vineyard last summer."

"You never heard from her?"

"Our daughter, Frankie, got a postcard from her about a week after she left. It was mailed from New York City. It said she was fine and not to worry. That was all."

"I might want to talk with people you know. That includes your family and friends and the people you work with."

He nodded, then frowned. "Do you have to talk with our daughter? This business has upset her terribly."

"If I do, I'll try to make it painless."

"I'd rather you didn't do it at all. Frankie's a freshman at UConn, and she's got the jitters about that on top of this other thing." He rubbed his forehead. "This is a terrible situation. I'm afraid something has happened to Kathy. Otherwise I'm sure we'd have heard from her."

"I'll see what I can do, but, like I said, you shouldn't get your hopes too high."

We finished our beers and he went away. I ordered another and drank it while I looked over the file he'd left. Thornberry Security had been thorough and their information was useful. About the only thing I could do that they hadn't already done was talk to some people they hadn't interviewed here on the island.

Tomorrow was soon enough for that. Today I had to get ready for the Derby and meet Brady Coyne when he came down from Boston. Brady used his law practice to support his fishing habit, and his plan was to combine some fly fishing in the Derby with some legal work for Sarah Fairchild, who owned two hundred acres up on the north shore overlooking Vineyard Sound.

My father and Sarah had met before I was born, and Sarah had taken to him enough to give him, and after his death me, lifetime access to Fairchild Cove, which consisted of Fairchild Point and Fairchild Beach, and which was one of the best bass-fishing and bluefishing spots on the island.

But now Sarah was old, and Brady was going to help her decide what to do with her estate. The very idea of trying to deal with that can of worms made me glad I wasn't a lawyer.

I left the Fireside, pushed Katherine Bannerman to the back of my mind, and headed home, thinking Derby thoughts. In September the bluefish are back, heading south after their summer sojourn to cooler northern waters, and to celebrate this return and to extend the tourist season, the Vineyard hosts a month-long fishing derby from the middle of September to the middle of October. Hundreds of fishermen and fisherwomen come over from America and join island anglers in pursuit of striped bass, bluefish, bonito, and false albacore. Local plumbers, carpenters, landscapers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, and chiefs close up shop and go fishing. They become haggard and thin as they lose sleep and money to chase fish, and their customers grow surly when they're unable to find anyone to do work for them. In mid-October, when the Derby ends, normalcy returns and you can finally get somebody to rake your lawn or fix that leaky pipe in your basement.

The Derby thrives in spite of the increasing difficulty fishermen have getting to traditional angling spots. The problem is a familiar one in all resort communities, where local land is owned by outside people. On Martha's Vineyard, more and more off-islanders, both individuals and corporations, are buying property and closing off access routes to the woods and shore. NO TRESPASSING signs are tacked on locked gates that previously were open to fishermen and hunters. Local folks, who once felt welcome to cast a line or pop a cap almost anywhere on the Vineyard, now can't get close to hunting stands or fishing spots. Only a lucky few, like me, have permission to open gates and cross private lands. I was happy to be among the chosen, although I wasn't sure how much longer my privileges would last.

I spent the early afternoon with Zee on our screened porch lubricating our reels, replacing rusty hooks with new ones, and checking lines and leaders and rods. Katherine Bannerman refused to stay out of my mind, so while we worked I told Zee about the job I'd taken.

"People don't just leave without a reason," said Zee. "If you find out why she left, maybe you can find out where she went. What did you think of Bannerman?"

"I'm not sure. People wear different faces in different situations. I'm pretty certain he wants to find her, because he's spent a lot of time and money trying to do it. But on the other hand, he's made a lot of money in the last few years, so he can afford to finance an expensive search even if it's just for appearances."

"Is there another woman in his life?"

"None that Thornberry found."

"How about another man in hers?"

"No, but apparently she likes to dance and socialize more than her husband does, and it was a point of contention between them. According to Thornberry, Bannerman is either at the office or at home getting rested up so he can go back to the office. She wanted more than that in her life. Is that enough to send her packing, do you think?"

"Could be. Maybe she was having a midlife crisis."

"I thought only men had those. They divorce their wives and go off with blonde bimbos."

"It happens to both genders. The difference is, nowadays more women have enough money to leave boring hubbies. That wasn't always the case."

When our gear was in good shape, I drove with the kids to Fairchild Cove to make a few practice casts with each of the rods while Zee stayed home to wash her hair and muck out the guest room for Brady. The master plan was for us to take Brady, between lawyering stints, with us as we roamed the beaches in search of that prizewinning fish.

Joshua and Diana and I drove up to Vineyard Haven and managed to make a left turn at the infamous Tee intersection of State Road and the Edgartown Road, the site of one of the three worst permanent traffic jams on the island, the other two occurring at the Five Corners near the Vineyard Haven ferry docks and between Al's Package Store and the A&P in Edgartown. Smart Vineyard Haven cops do nothing to correct the situations at the Tee or at the Five Corners, because the traffic jams slow cars to a crawl, which is the speed for which island roads are constructed. The jams, of course, are caused by people making left turns. I've been pointing this out for years, but does anybody listen? No. When I'm king of the world, I'm banning left turns.

We drove to West Tisbury, then turned into the narrow, sandy driveway that led to the Fairchild place. A hundred yards along, a smaller lane split off to the right. We took that and came to a locked gate. I had the key.

"How come there's a gate, Pa?" asked Joshua.

"Because the people who own the land don't want other people to come in."

"How come you have a key?"

"Because we're special."

The lane led down to Fairchild Cove. It wound through the trees and past some big rocks left behind by the glacier that, before its eventual retreat back north, had created the Vineyard, Nantucket, Long Island, and other south coastal islands by pushing part of what is now New Hampshire down into what is now the sea. On the far side of the big rocks, we curled over a rise and dropped down toward the shore.

"Look, Pa. A haunted house." Diana pointed.

It did look something like a haunted house. Actually, it was the stone cottage that some nineteenth-century Fairchild male had built as a hunting and fishing lodge for himself and his buddies. As cottages go, it was pretty fair-sized, and in its day it had all of the amenities. But for as long as I had been driving to the cove, the place had been in ruins and, as empty and abandoned houses do, it had taken on an increasingly forsaken air. Maybe it was haunted. According to tales I'd heard in my youth, it had never been used again after the drowning death of one of the Fairchild buddies who had been staying there with his fishing pals. The victim had, it was said, been done in by that familiar fisherman's notion that they're biting better over there than over here. He had waded out to the rocks at the tip of Fairchild Point, been trapped by the rising tide, and had drowned trying to get back to shore.

Whether his ghost still hung around the cottage was something I'd never thought of until my daughter's remark. Maybe Diana was psychic.

"I don't think that it's haunted," I said, "but it does look scary."

"No," insisted little Diana. "It's haunted, all right. It's got ghosts."

I glanced at her and she looked up at me. "Don't worry, Pa. They're not bad ghosts. You don't have to be scared of them."

The lane turned and we left the cottage behind us and came to the beach. Fairchild Point was to the west. Reaching out from its tip was the underwater sandbar that the drowned fisherman had followed to the fatal rocks that lay thirty yards out in the sound. The beach curved east to other rocks lying at the foot of the embankment that formed that end of the shallow cove. Out across the sound I could see the Elizabeth Islands and Tarpaulin Cove, where I had anchored more than once while cruising in the Shirley J.

There was a battered pickup truck parked in front of us, and fifty yards to our left a large man was reeling in his line and looking in our direction. His grizzled face wore a scowl. Nate Fairchild, Sarah's son. He didn't like me or anybody else that I knew of. I parked and pointed at Fairchild. "You see that man?"

"Yes, Pa."

"Stay away from him. He doesn't like people to get too close to him when he's fishing. When you get out, go in the other direction to play."

"Is he one of those big people who don't like children?" asked Diana, who was particularly perceptive today.

"Yes, he is."

"I don't like him, either, then."

Smart Diana. We got out and I looked at Fairchild and lifted a hand. He made no reply, but turned back to his line. Diana and Joshua went down the beach away from Fairchild. I got the first rod from the roof rack.

The sun was bright, the air was warm, and the tide was just beginning to run west. It wasn't the best time to wet a line in the cove. That happens at first light just before or after the changing of the tide. But when you fish, any time is better than no time.

I tried all of our rods and several lures and never saw a sign of life in the sea. Off toward the point, Nate Fairchild wasn't catching anything, either. I put the last rod back on the roof rack and called to the kids. They were wet and sandy, so I had them go back in the water to rinse off most of the sand, then wrapped them in beach towels and took them home.

Zee was on the phone, so I put the kids into the outdoor shower, dried them again, and sent them into the house to get dressed. I hung their wet bathing suits on the line, and thought happy thoughts about that shower. An outdoor shower is one of the world's best things. You never have to worry about steaming up the walls or getting sand on the floor, and there's a fine feeling of freedom and airiness that you never get in an indoor shower. We used ours almost all year, forsaking it only when winter arrived in force.

I looked at the watch I'd found in the South Beach surf. You should never pay more than nine dollars for a watch, and mine had cost me only the price of a new band. A bargain. The watch said it was after four o'clock.

I had poured myself a Sam Adams and was up on the balcony drinking it when Zee, martini in hand, came up and sat beside me. She was sleek as a leopard, and her black hair gleamed. Joshua and Diana were down in the yard, looking up. The cats, Velcro and Oliver Underfoot, were in the garden doing cat things.

"Can we come up, Pa?"

"No, Josh. This is big-people time on the balcony."

It was the daily answer to his daily question. He tried another familiar one. "Can we build the tree house, Pa?"

The big beech behind the house was an excellent place for a tree house.

"Not today. Now go play. Your mother and I are having some private time."

Joshua and his sister went to look at the beech tree.

"That was Brady on the phone," said Zee. "Plans have changed. He's getting here at six and having supper with us, but Sarah Fairchild wants him to stay with her. So after we eat, we'll take him up there. I'm sorry he won't be staying with us."

"Well, Brady's been her lawyer for years. If she wants him to stay with her, I guess he should. She's business. We're just for fun."

Zee finished her martini and glanced at her watch. "Time to meet the boat. We're having spag for supper. I've thawed out a batch of your sauce, so you can warm that up and make the garlic bread while I go pick up Brady." She kissed me and went down the stairs.

I looked out over the gardens toward Nantucket Sound and thought about Katherine Bannerman. The dark blue waters touched a pale evening sky, and there was a single sail out on the horizon. Maybe Katherine was on that boat. Maybe she was looking at that sky.

Probably not.

Beauty is truth and truth beauty, the poet said, but I couldn't imagine much of either in the Bannerman case. I finished my beer and went down to the kitchen.

Copyright © 2002 by Philip R. Craig and William G. Tapply

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Table of Contents

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First Chapter

Chapter One: J.W.

I had arranged to meet James Bannerman in the Fireside because it was close to the ferry landing, so he could catch the boat and go home to Connecticut after we talked. I was the only customer when he came in. He was a medium-sized guy in his mid-forties. He had flat, dark eyes and hair, and he looked in shape. He wore white-collar clothes. He glanced around, saw only me and the bartender and Bonzo wiping tables in the corner of the room. He came over to the bar.

"Are you Jackson?"

"My friends call me J.W."

The bartender drifted down while Bannerman and I were shaking hands. Bannerman pointed at my glass of Sam Adams. "Bring a couple more of those to us over in that booth, please." The "please" softened it, but it was clear that Bannerman was used to giving orders.

Bannerman and I went to the booth. He shoved a photograph at me. "That's her. That's my wife, my Katherine."

The photo was of an attractive blonde woman about my age, which made her only a few years younger than Bannerman. I drank from my glass. "Look," I said, "I'm only here because Jason Thornberry asked me to meet you. We've worked together a couple of times before, but like I told him on the phone, I don't think I'm the right man for this job. Your wife is legally separated from you, so where she goes and what she does is her own business."

"Don't say that. I'm desperate. Thornberry's people finally managed to trace her this far last year, but then they lost her. She was here on the Vineyard, but then she dropped out of sight just before Labor Day. I've been here several times this summer, trying to find her, but my work won't let me stay long.You're my last chance."

"You really need a professional. I haven't been a cop for years. I'm retired. If you don't think Thornberry Security can do the job, you should hire some other private investigator, but I think Thornberry is about as good an outfit as you'll find."

"Money's no problem, if that's what's holding you back. I've got plenty. And I don't need some other PI, I need you. Thornberry himself recommended you. He said he's been trying for years to get you to work for him, but you won't. He says you live here, you know the people, and you know this island. He says local knowledge might make the difference. Don't let me down. Please. I love Katherine. I have to find her!"

He dug out a handkerchief and wiped his face. I let myself feel sorry for him and looked at the photo again. He mentioned a sum of money that was large enough to capture my attention. When you live on Martha's Vineyard and don't have a regular job, you always need money.

"Maybe she's still here on the Vineyard," he said. "We honeymooned here, and she loved the place. I think that's why she came back here. Maybe she's living here, using another name. If she is, I want you to find her. If she's gone, find out where she went. Please."

Bannerman was a tough-looking man, but he wasn't acting tough at all. He looked like he wanted to cry. I wondered if he was an amateur thespian, pulling my strings, or if he was one of those people who fool themselves about their own virtue, or if he was really as concerned as he was acting. I had no real reason to think it wasn't the latter.

I thought of the things I was planning to do. Fishing in the annual Derby was highest on the list. I was tired of being the only surf caster on Martha's Vineyard who had never caught a forty-pound bass.

"Look," said Bannerman, leaning forward, "if Katherine doesn't want to see me, that's fine. All I really want to know is that she's well and happy. I love her. Frankie, that's our daughter, loves her. Kathy's the most important thing in the world to us. Please help me."

His words were consistent with feelings I also had. I was in love with my wife. If Zee ever left me, I'd be miserable, but I'd want her to be happy.

"Please," said Bannerman for the fourth or fifth time.

I didn't want the job, but unlike Sam Spade I was a sap when it came to love or its appearance.

"All right," I said. "I'll see what I can do. But don't get your hopes up. If Thornberry Security can't find her, the chances are that I can't either. And a couple of other things. I can't spend all of my time on this job. I have other commitments. And if I do find her, it'll be up to her whether or not I tell you where she is. I'll tell you if I find her, but I may not tell you where."

"Thank you," said Bannerman. "I appreciate your help more than I can say." He wiped his face again and put the handkerchief away. I poured more beer into my glass and drank it. It was cool and smooth.

"Here," said Bannerman, who had been digging in his briefcase. He put a checkbook on the table and handed me a large envelope. "In there you'll find all of the information I gave Thornberry when they went to work for me and all that they've given me since. Maybe there's something there that will help you. If you need to know more, let me know, and I'll tell you what I can." While I pulled a file from the envelope and glanced at it, he scribbled a check and pushed it at me. It was too much, but if that was fine with him, it was fine with me, so I didn't make an issue of it.

"I'll look at this later," I said, pushing the file back into its envelope, "but you can tell me some things right now. First, why did she leave?"

He'd heard the question before, probably from both his local police and certainly from Thornberry, since detectives in both agencies would understand that husbands usually know why their wives disappear.

"I honestly don't know," he said, looking me right in the eye. "We had our ups and downs like everybody else, but nothing serious. Then one morning after I went to the office, she just drove away from our house there in Hartford and I haven't seen her since. The neighbors saw her go. She was alone. That was a year ago last spring. I've been looking for her ever since, but all I've found out is that she was here on the Vineyard last summer."

"You never heard from her?"

"Our daughter, Frankie, got a postcard from her about a week after she left. It was mailed from New York City. It said she was fine and not to worry. That was all."

"I might want to talk with people you know. That includes your family and friends and the people you work with."

He nodded, then frowned. "Do you have to talk with our daughter? This business has upset her terribly."

"If I do, I'll try to make it painless."

"I'd rather you didn't do it at all. Frankie's a freshman at UConn, and she's got the jitters about that on top of this other thing." He rubbed his forehead. "This is a terrible situation. I'm afraid something has happened to Kathy. Otherwise I'm sure we'd have heard from her."

"I'll see what I can do, but, like I said, you shouldn't get your hopes too high."

We finished our beers and he went away. I ordered another and drank it while I looked over the file he'd left. Thornberry Security had been thorough and their information was useful. About the only thing I could do that they hadn't already done was talk to some people they hadn't interviewed here on the island.

Tomorrow was soon enough for that. Today I had to get ready for the Derby and meet Brady Coyne when he came down from Boston. Brady used his law practice to support his fishing habit, and his plan was to combine some fly fishing in the Derby with some legal work for Sarah Fairchild, who owned two hundred acres up on the north shore overlooking Vineyard Sound.

My father and Sarah had met before I was born, and Sarah had taken to him enough to give him, and after his death me, lifetime access to Fairchild Cove, which consisted of Fairchild Point and Fairchild Beach, and which was one of the best bass-fishing and bluefishing spots on the island.

But now Sarah was old, and Brady was going to help her decide what to do with her estate. The very idea of trying to deal with that can of worms made me glad I wasn't a lawyer.

I left the Fireside, pushed Katherine Bannerman to the back of my mind, and headed home, thinking Derby thoughts. In September the bluefish are back, heading south after their summer sojourn to cooler northern waters, and to celebrate this return and to extend the tourist season, the Vineyard hosts a month-long fishing derby from the middle of September to the middle of October. Hundreds of fishermen and fisherwomen come over from America and join island anglers in pursuit of striped bass, bluefish, bonito, and false albacore. Local plumbers, carpenters, landscapers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, and chiefs close up shop and go fishing. They become haggard and thin as they lose sleep and money to chase fish, and their customers grow surly when they're unable to find anyone to do work for them. In mid-October, when the Derby ends, normalcy returns and you can finally get somebody to rake your lawn or fix that leaky pipe in your basement.

The Derby thrives in spite of the increasing difficulty fishermen have getting to traditional angling spots. The problem is a familiar one in all resort communities, where local land is owned by outside people. On Martha's Vineyard, more and more off-islanders, both individuals and corporations, are buying property and closing off access routes to the woods and shore. NO TRESPASSING signs are tacked on locked gates that previously were open to fishermen and hunters. Local folks, who once felt welcome to cast a line or pop a cap almost anywhere on the Vineyard, now can't get close to hunting stands or fishing spots. Only a lucky few, like me, have permission to open gates and cross private lands. I was happy to be among the chosen, although I wasn't sure how much longer my privileges would last.

I spent the early afternoon with Zee on our screened porch lubricating our reels, replacing rusty hooks with new ones, and checking lines and leaders and rods. Katherine Bannerman refused to stay out of my mind, so while we worked I told Zee about the job I'd taken.

"People don't just leave without a reason," said Zee. "If you find out why she left, maybe you can find out where she went. What did you think of Bannerman?"

"I'm not sure. People wear different faces in different situations. I'm pretty certain he wants to find her, because he's spent a lot of time and money trying to do it. But on the other hand, he's made a lot of money in the last few years, so he can afford to finance an expensive search even if it's just for appearances."

"Is there another woman in his life?"

"None that Thornberry found."

"How about another man in hers?"

"No, but apparently she likes to dance and socialize more than her husband does, and it was a point of contention between them. According to Thornberry, Bannerman is either at the office or at home getting rested up so he can go back to the office. She wanted more than that in her life. Is that enough to send her packing, do you think?"

"Could be. Maybe she was having a midlife crisis."

"I thought only men had those. They divorce their wives and go off with blonde bimbos."

"It happens to both genders. The difference is, nowadays more women have enough money to leave boring hubbies. That wasn't always the case."

When our gear was in good shape, I drove with the kids to Fairchild Cove to make a few practice casts with each of the rods while Zee stayed home to wash her hair and muck out the guest room for Brady. The master plan was for us to take Brady, between lawyering stints, with us as we roamed the beaches in search of that prizewinning fish.

Joshua and Diana and I drove up to Vineyard Haven and managed to make a left turn at the infamous Tee intersection of State Road and the Edgartown Road, the site of one of the three worst permanent traffic jams on the island, the other two occurring at the Five Corners near the Vineyard Haven ferry docks and between Al's Package Store and the A&P in Edgartown. Smart Vineyard Haven cops do nothing to correct the situations at the Tee or at the Five Corners, because the traffic jams slow cars to a crawl, which is the speed for which island roads are constructed. The jams, of course, are caused by people making left turns. I've been pointing this out for years, but does anybody listen? No. When I'm king of the world, I'm banning left turns.

We drove to West Tisbury, then turned into the narrow, sandy driveway that led to the Fairchild place. A hundred yards along, a smaller lane split off to the right. We took that and came to a locked gate. I had the key.

"How come there's a gate, Pa?" asked Joshua.

"Because the people who own the land don't want other people to come in."

"How come you have a key?"

"Because we're special."

The lane led down to Fairchild Cove. It wound through the trees and past some big rocks left behind by the glacier that, before its eventual retreat back north, had created the Vineyard, Nantucket, Long Island, and other south coastal islands by pushing part of what is now New Hampshire down into what is now the sea. On the far side of the big rocks, we curled over a rise and dropped down toward the shore.

"Look, Pa. A haunted house." Diana pointed.

It did look something like a haunted house. Actually, it was the stone cottage that some nineteenth-century Fairchild male had built as a hunting and fishing lodge for himself and his buddies. As cottages go, it was pretty fair-sized, and in its day it had all of the amenities. But for as long as I had been driving to the cove, the place had been in ruins and, as empty and abandoned houses do, it had taken on an increasingly forsaken air. Maybe it was haunted. According to tales I'd heard in my youth, it had never been used again after the drowning death of one of the Fairchild buddies who had been staying there with his fishing pals. The victim had, it was said, been done in by that familiar fisherman's notion that they're biting better over there than over here. He had waded out to the rocks at the tip of Fairchild Point, been trapped by the rising tide, and had drowned trying to get back to shore.

Whether his ghost still hung around the cottage was something I'd never thought of until my daughter's remark. Maybe Diana was psychic.

"I don't think that it's haunted," I said, "but it does look scary."

"No," insisted little Diana. "It's haunted, all right. It's got ghosts."

I glanced at her and she looked up at me. "Don't worry, Pa. They're not bad ghosts. You don't have to be scared of them."

The lane turned and we left the cottage behind us and came to the beach. Fairchild Point was to the west. Reaching out from its tip was the underwater sandbar that the drowned fisherman had followed to the fatal rocks that lay thirty yards out in the sound. The beach curved east to other rocks lying at the foot of the embankment that formed that end of the shallow cove. Out across the sound I could see the Elizabeth Islands and Tarpaulin Cove, where I had anchored more than once while cruising in the Shirley J.

There was a battered pickup truck parked in front of us, and fifty yards to our left a large man was reeling in his line and looking in our direction. His grizzled face wore a scowl. Nate Fairchild, Sarah's son. He didn't like me or anybody else that I knew of. I parked and pointed at Fairchild. "You see that man?"

"Yes, Pa."

"Stay away from him. He doesn't like people to get too close to him when he's fishing. When you get out, go in the other direction to play."

"Is he one of those big people who don't like children?" asked Diana, who was particularly perceptive today.

"Yes, he is."

"I don't like him, either, then."

Smart Diana. We got out and I looked at Fairchild and lifted a hand. He made no reply, but turned back to his line. Diana and Joshua went down the beach away from Fairchild. I got the first rod from the roof rack.

The sun was bright, the air was warm, and the tide was just beginning to run west. It wasn't the best time to wet a line in the cove. That happens at first light just before or after the changing of the tide. But when you fish, any time is better than no time.

I tried all of our rods and several lures and never saw a sign of life in the sea. Off toward the point, Nate Fairchild wasn't catching anything, either. I put the last rod back on the roof rack and called to the kids. They were wet and sandy, so I had them go back in the water to rinse off most of the sand, then wrapped them in beach towels and took them home.

Zee was on the phone, so I put the kids into the outdoor shower, dried them again, and sent them into the house to get dressed. I hung their wet bathing suits on the line, and thought happy thoughts about that shower. An outdoor shower is one of the world's best things. You never have to worry about steaming up the walls or getting sand on the floor, and there's a fine feeling of freedom and airiness that you never get in an indoor shower. We used ours almost all year, forsaking it only when winter arrived in force.

I looked at the watch I'd found in the South Beach surf. You should never pay more than nine dollars for a watch, and mine had cost me only the price of a new band. A bargain. The watch said it was after four o'clock.

I had poured myself a Sam Adams and was up on the balcony drinking it when Zee, martini in hand, came up and sat beside me. She was sleek as a leopard, and her black hair gleamed. Joshua and Diana were down in the yard, looking up. The cats, Velcro and Oliver Underfoot, were in the garden doing cat things.

"Can we come up, Pa?"

"No, Josh. This is big-people time on the balcony."

It was the daily answer to his daily question. He tried another familiar one. "Can we build the tree house, Pa?"

The big beech behind the house was an excellent place for a tree house.

"Not today. Now go play. Your mother and I are having some private time."

Joshua and his sister went to look at the beech tree.

"That was Brady on the phone," said Zee. "Plans have changed. He's getting here at six and having supper with us, but Sarah Fairchild wants him to stay with her. So after we eat, we'll take him up there. I'm sorry he won't be staying with us."

"Well, Brady's been her lawyer for years. If she wants him to stay with her, I guess he should. She's business. We're just for fun."

Zee finished her martini and glanced at her watch. "Time to meet the boat. We're having spag for supper. I've thawed out a batch of your sauce, so you can warm that up and make the garlic bread while I go pick up Brady." She kissed me and went down the stairs.

I looked out over the gardens toward Nantucket Sound and thought about Katherine Bannerman. The dark blue waters touched a pale evening sky, and there was a single sail out on the horizon. Maybe Katherine was on that boat. Maybe she was looking at that sky.

Probably not.

Beauty is truth and truth beauty, the poet said, but I couldn't imagine much of either in the Bannerman case. I finished my beer and went down to the kitchen.

Copyright © 2002 by Philip R. Craig and William G. Tapply

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2013

    Cost

    For a 2002 release you want $ 14.00 ? Are you kidding me ??

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2012

    highly recommend

    I enjoyed the first book, finish at the beach on vacation and ordered the second one right away

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2005

    Extraordinary

    I was extremely impressed how the two writers synchronized their respective story. A very good read. I'm looking forward to reading more from both authors.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2003

    read this book

    I have read vineyard mysteries This book was just wonderful I hope there will be many more I can hardly wait

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

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