First Stringers: Eyes That Do Not See

Overview

In the near future, a group of handicapped twenty-one-year-olds with the ability to control the string structure of the universe, find each other and form an alliance against the people and organizations who would hunt them down and use their powers to conquer the world. As they discover one another they must strive to master their abilities, overcome their conflicts, face their personal fears and discover their deepest values in order to become more fully human.
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Overview

In the near future, a group of handicapped twenty-one-year-olds with the ability to control the string structure of the universe, find each other and form an alliance against the people and organizations who would hunt them down and use their powers to conquer the world. As they discover one another they must strive to master their abilities, overcome their conflicts, face their personal fears and discover their deepest values in order to become more fully human.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453653821
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/1/2010
  • Pages: 616
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.24 (d)

Meet the Author

Gerald M. Weinberg (Jerry) writes "nerd novels," such as The Aremac Project and Mistress of Molecules-about how brilliant people produce quality work. More of his novels may be found as eBooks at . Before taking up his science fiction career, he published books on human behavior, including Weinberg on Writing: The Fieldstone Method, The Psychology of Computer Programming, Perfect Software and Other Fallacies, and an Introduction to General Systems Thinking. He also wrote books on leadership including Becoming a Technical Leader, The Secrets of Consulting (Foreword by Virginia Satir), More Secrets of Consulting, and the four-volume Quality Software Management series. He incorporates his knowledge of science, engineering, and human behavior into all of writing and consulting work (with writers, hi-tech researchers, and software engineers).

Early in his career, he was the architect for the Mercury Project's space tracking network and designer of the world's first multiprogrammed operating system. Winner of the Warnier Prize and the Stevens Award for his writing on software quality, he is also a charter member of the Computing Hall of Fame in San Diego and the University of Nebraska Hall of Fame. His website and blogs may be found at http://www.geraldmweinberg.com.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 21, 2011

    Very Recommended - "Kids with super-powers" and a relation to the String theory

    I got interested into the book because of its blurb.
    The mix of "kids with super-powers" and a relation to the String theory seemed fascinating. Well, the String theory is only loosely related, but nevertheless the book was (is) a hit for me.

    Anytime I opened the book I ended up reading a dozen or more chapters in a row; sometimes till the crack of dawn (no joke).
    Even so the nearly 500 pages took some time to read, but still I was sad, when I reached the last page.

    The story unfolded and evolved at a good pace; I never lost the interest (too slow) or the overview (too fast).

    In hindsight I think, it contains some "teens get responsibilities and grow mature" morale, but that was a very fine underline and not in the way.

    The ending was a good closure for the first part, but left enough space (cliffhanger anyone?) for the second part.

    Which I will buy right now, so my review is over.
    I heartily recommend the book for any reader who likes "super power" stories with a twist.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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