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The First Year: HIV: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
     

The First Year: HIV: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed

3.5 2
by Brett Grodeck, Daniel S. Berger (Foreword by)
 

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Close to one million people are infected with HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—in the U.S., and though in the last ten years therapies have been developed to successfully fight both the HIV infection and its associated illnesses, the physical and emotional tolls are devastating. In the tradition of the other titles in the First Year™ series, The

Overview


Close to one million people are infected with HIV—the virus that causes AIDS—in the U.S., and though in the last ten years therapies have been developed to successfully fight both the HIV infection and its associated illnesses, the physical and emotional tolls are devastating. In the tradition of the other titles in the First Year™ series, The First Year™—HIV uses a unique approach—guiding readers through their first seven days following diagnosis, then the next three weeks of their first month, and finally the next eleven months of their first year—to provide answers and advice that will help everyone newly diagnosed with HIV come to terms with their condition and the lifestyle changes that accompany it. Starting with the day of diagnosis, author Brett Grodeck provides vital information about the nature of HIV, choosing the right doctors, treatment options, coping mechanisms, holistic alternatives, and much more. The First Year™—HIV will be a supportive and educational resource for everyone who wants to take an active role in the management of their condition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781569244906
Publisher:
Da Capo Press
Publication date:
06/15/2003
Series:
First Year Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.99(w) x 9.08(h) x 0.79(d)

Meet the Author

Brett Grodeck, a longtime HIV awareness advocate, has been HIV-positive for eighteen years. An accomplished writer, his articles have appeared in the Chicago Reader, Chicago magazine, Men's Health, and various HIV treatment journals. As a patient advocate, he has consulted for the Food and Drug Administration's antiviral advisory committee. Grodeck lives in Los Angeles.

Daniel S. Berger, MD, is Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago and is the Founder and Medical Director of Chicago's largest private HIV treatment and research center, Northstar Healthcare. Dr. Berger is widely recognized throughout the industry and community and serves on the HIV Medical Issues Committee for the Illinois AIDS Drug Assistance Program.

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First Year: HIV: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed (First Year Series) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Brett Grodeck's book THE FIRST YEAR HIV is a book that anyone sexually active should read regardless if they are hiv+ or not and also a book to read if you know someone who has hiv. This book takes the subject seriously, but it's a good read and I've learned much about HIV itself and moreso, how to prevent myself from getting it. Mr. Grodeck has done a wonderful job in preparing this no-nonsense book. Getting HIV would be a terrible thing but I absolutely recommend that this book be made available to high schools and libraries throughout the world. I also think the book would make a wonderful gift to someone that you know that is sexually active and would like to know more about HIV. Grodeck also talks about other stds, but overall he writes in a simple, effective manner. The book is flawless and I highly recommend it. Grodeck has done his homework and I bow to this man for the straightforward information. You won't be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book fails to focus on ever changing improving drug treatments. People can now live with this disease. Author focuses on the liklihood of eventual drug failure and the end game. Author talks about the emotional aspects of the diagnosis as if they are so common as almost to be dismissed by the reader regardless of his own unique experience and distress on receiving the news of HIV. I found many comments hurtful and flippant. For example, the author might say that by week 10 you'll feel this way, or that way, providing a punchlist of expected feeling. In my own conversations with my MD I had learned most of the book's information in the first few weeks after diagnosis, before I found the book. Try calling Project Inform in SF rather than buying this book, which will depress you, discourage you, and trivialize your own experience.