Fish Catcher

Fish Catcher

4.5 2
by David Carter
     
 

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It is London, a blitzed city. Up till now Mary Fiss has resisted being sent to the country but when the Mulryne's house opposite is bombed, slaughtering little Orla,Mary relents. 2 days later in the company of her sister Daisy, and 500 strangers she departs Paddington station bound for Devon. They pitch up in a small country town along with an abandoned boy Billy

Overview

It is London, a blitzed city. Up till now Mary Fiss has resisted being sent to the country but when the Mulryne's house opposite is bombed, slaughtering little Orla,Mary relents. 2 days later in the company of her sister Daisy, and 500 strangers she departs Paddington station bound for Devon. They pitch up in a small country town along with an abandoned boy Billy Grimes, they wait to find their new Mum and Dad. Some of the kids are taken to the guesthouses, some to the Vicarage, or Smithy, but Billy and the Fissleborough sisters are driven into the hills to Wolfdale. Mary has always fancied herself as a private detective, and it is not long before she is looking into the affairs at Wolfdale. Why is the front bedroom always locked? Who is the smooth stranger Oliver Tresco who glides about the Hall? And where is the daughter, Cicely, who no one has seen? The more she discovers,the darker the picture appears. Is it a figment of Mary's over-active imagination, or could they be in danger at Wolfdale?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781847539304
Publisher:
Lulu.com
Publication date:
12/28/2006
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.54(d)

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Fish Catcher 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are several clichés that come to mind while reading this murder/mystery, `what goes around, comes around there are skeletons in everyones¿ closet.¿ You will have to read this novel to understand the full impact of what I mean. In September 1939, massive evacuations of England¿s major cities began with pregnant women and children. During this devastating occurrence in history, how often do we think about the children? Their lives are were forever changed, their thoughts molded for ultimate survival. Based on several young characters that become evacuees, banished to rural areas to escape the bombings in England, we are treated to an inside and well researched version of the possibilities that may have occurred while they were supposedly in the care of `Evacuee Wardens.¿ Torn from their homes and loved ones, these children of World War II were abruptly thrown into a foreign world. Fiction combined with truth keeps this story flowing. The reality and personal insight into bombings and devastation of houses, which were actually the homes and lives of real families, mixed with the logic behind two fictional murder cover-ups, entices the reader to a rational understanding of each story. The author, David Carter has accurately described the devastating effect of bombs and opened the imagination to the plight of an evacuee¿s peril, yet understanding the need that `life goes on.¿ It is truly a powerful story of how children bond together to protect each other in order to survive personal upheaval. David Carter is a well established English author who also has an extremely interesting web site with published articles varying from writing tips, the sport of cricket to identity theft. Obviously multitalented I am sure we will hear from him many times to come. A well written mystery with a touch of historical fact. A novel suitable for both older children and adults which I would Highly Recommend to either generation. Reviewer: Cheryl Ellis, Allbooks Reviews
Guest More than 1 year ago
because it made me laugh, it made me cry, it kept me turning the pages,and I finished it in just over two days. Think world war two kids in England taken from home for safety reasons, and all that follows. I'm glad I read it.