Fishing Day

Fishing Day

4.0 1
by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Shane W. Evans
     
 

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Reenie and her mama love to go fishing down by the river. But the peace of their idyllic fishing spot is often marred by the appearance of Peter Troop and his daddy. Peter is up-jumpy and loud, scaring the fish away. And the Troops harbor some resentment toward them, too. Peter and his daddy are fishing for food; Reenie and Mama fish for fun. The Troops are white;

Overview

Reenie and her mama love to go fishing down by the river. But the peace of their idyllic fishing spot is often marred by the appearance of Peter Troop and his daddy. Peter is up-jumpy and loud, scaring the fish away. And the Troops harbor some resentment toward them, too. Peter and his daddy are fishing for food; Reenie and Mama fish for fun. The Troops are white; Reenie and Mama are black. And in the Jim Crow South, it is this last difference that is most significant. One day, when the Troops' fishing reel breaks, Reenie overcomes their mutual fear and mistrust to help Peter-an act that holds the promise of friendship and understanding. This is a moving story about two children crossing boundaries of race, class, and gender, and about small acts that make a big difference.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-A story of differences and similarities, compassion and generosity. Reenie and her mom, who are black, love to fish from the banks of the aptly nicknamed Jim Crow River. Peter and his dad, who are white, fish at the same river. However, the two families never speak to one another because, as the girl's mother reminds her, "We and white folks have kept our distance here, for as long as memory serves." While the females catch fish, the males are frustrated in their attempts. They need help, and Reenie decides to take the initiative and offer the boy some assistance and advice when he is alone. Evans takes Pinkney's words and transforms them into powerfully expressive images. Readers will easily identify with the emotions of the characters, and gain a sense of time and place. The illustrations spill across double pages in Evans's characteristic warm shades of blue, brown, green, and gold. The river flows across most of the spreads, sometimes at the top, other times at the center or bottom of the page. This heartwarming story has broad appeal and ends on a hopeful note; the children are no longer the strangers that they once were. In an author's note, Pinkney explains the term "Jim Crow" and how she came to write this book.-Mary N. Oluonye, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786807666
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Publication date:
11/01/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
AD690L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

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Fishing Day 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
NickMel64 More than 1 year ago
A story about an African American mother and her daughter, Reenie, who love to go fishing with one another every Saturday. However, their fishing trip often gets interrupted by a Caucasian father and his son, Pigeon. These two families always seem to run into each other along the banks of the Jim Crow River. Reenie and her mother are constantly catching fish, while Pigeon and his father never do. Pigeon is a very active boy and likes to throw rocks into the river, scaring all the fish away. The two families never talk because African Americans like to keep their distance from the white folks. The two males end up breaking their reel and Pigeon's dad heads for his truck to make repairs. Reenie is quick to act and runs over to Pigeon and offers him some help. Pickney does a wonderful job telling a story about a very difficult time in history and makes it easy for younger children to understand. The illustrations are amazing and really capture every meaning of the text. Children will feel like they are standing right next to the characters along the Jim Crow River banks. In the end, Reenie and Pigeon are able to overcome being strangers and become friends. This story is about differences and similiarities and would be wonderful to use in a lower elementary classroom to teach social studies.