Five Little Peppers and How They Grew (Classic Starts Series)

( 34 )

Overview

“To help mother”: that was the goal of each and every one of the five Pepper children. Yet even as “Mamsie” struggles hard to feed and educate her brood, she still manages to fill the house with joy. The adventures of this poor but loving family—Ben, Polly, Joel, Davie, and the adored youngest, Phronsie—have charmed young readers for more than a century. Overflowing with warmth, suspense, and many delightful surprises, this classic remains as compelling as ever.

A simplified retelling of the Margaret ...

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Five Little Peppers and How They Grew (Classic Starts Series)

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Overview

“To help mother”: that was the goal of each and every one of the five Pepper children. Yet even as “Mamsie” struggles hard to feed and educate her brood, she still manages to fill the house with joy. The adventures of this poor but loving family—Ben, Polly, Joel, Davie, and the adored youngest, Phronsie—have charmed young readers for more than a century. Overflowing with warmth, suspense, and many delightful surprises, this classic remains as compelling as ever.

A simplified retelling of the Margaret Sidney story in which a fatherless family, happy in spite of its impoverished condition, is befriended by a very rich gentleman.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402754203
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 3/3/2009
  • Series: Classic Starts Series
  • Edition description: Modern Retelling
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 262,135
  • Age range: 7 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Five Little Peppers and How They Grew


By Margaret Sidney

Aladdin

Copyright © 2006 Margaret Sidney
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1416916172

1: A Home View

The little old kitchen had quieted down from the bustle and confusion of midday; and now, with its afternoon manners on, presented a holiday aspect that, as the principal room in the brown house, it was eminently proper it should have. It was just on the edge of twilight; and the little Peppers, all except Ben, the oldest of the flock, were enjoying a "breathing spell" as their mother called it, which meant some quiet work suitable for the hour. It was all the "breathing spell" they could remember, however, poor things; for times were hard with them now. The father died w hen Phronsie was a baby and since then Mrs. Pepper had had hard work to scrape together money enough to put bread into her children's mouths, and to pay the rent of the Little Brown House.

But she had met life too bravely to be beaten down now. So with a stout heart and a cheery face, she had worked away day after day at making coats, and tailoring and mending of all descriptions; and she had seen with pride that couldn't be concealed, her noisy, happy brood growing up around her, and filling her heart with comfort, and making the Little Brown House fairly ring with jollity and fun.

"Poor things!" she wouldsay to herself, "they haven't had any bringing up; they've just scrambled up!" And then she would set her lips together tightly, and fly at her work faster than ever. "I must get learning for 'em some way, but I don't see how!"

Once or twice she had thought, "Now the time's coming!" but it never did: for winter shut in very cold, and it took so much more to feed and warm them that the money went faster than ever. And then, when the way seemed clear again, the store changed hands, so that for a long time she failed to get her usual supply of sacks and coats to make; and that made sad havoc in the quarters and half-dollars laid up as her nest egg. But -- "Well, it'll come some time," she would say to herself; "because it must!" And so at it again she would fly, brisker than ever.

"To help mother," was the great ambition of all the children, older and younger; but in Polly's and Ben's souls, the desire grew so overwhelmingly great as to absorb all lesser things. Many and vast were their secret plans, by which they were to astonish her at some future day, which they would only confide -- as they did everything else -- to one another. For this brother and sister were everything to each other, and stood loyally together through thick and thin.

Polly was ten, and Ben one year older; and the younger three of the "Five Little Peppers," as they were always called, looked up to them with the intensest admiration and love. What they failed to do, couldn't very well be done by any one!

"O dear!" exclaimed Polly as she sat over in the corner by the window, helping her mother pull out basting threads from a coat she had just finished, and giving an impatient twitch to the sleeve, "I do wish we could ever have any light -- just as much as we want!"

"You don't need any light to see these threads," said Mrs. Pepper, winding up hers carefully as she spoke, on an old spool. "Take care, Polly, you broke that; thread's dear now."

"I couldn't help it," said Polly, vexedly; "it snapped; everything's dear now, it seems to me! I wish we could have -- oh! ever an' ever so many candles; as many as we wanted! I'd light 'em all, so there! and have it light here one night, anyway!"

"Yes, and go dark all the rest of the year, like as anyway," observed Mrs. Pepper, stopping to untie a knot. "Folks who do so never have any candles," she added, sententiously.

"How many'd you have, Polly?" asked Joel, curiously, laying down his hammer, and regarding her with the utmost anxiety.

"Oh, two hundred!" said Polly, decidedly. "I'd have two hundred, all in a row!"

"Two hundred candles!" echoed Joel, in amazement. "My whockety! what a lot!"

"Don't say such dreadful words, Joel," put in Polly, nervously, stopping to pick up her spool of basting thread that was racing away all by itself; "'tisn't nice."

"'Tisn't worse'n than to wish you'd got things you haven't," retorted Joel. "I don't believe you'd light 'em all at once," he added, incredulously.

"Yes, I would, too!" replied Polly, recklessly; "two hundred of 'em, if I had a chance; all at once, so there, Joey Pepper!"

"Oh," said little Davie, drawing a long sigh. "Why, 'twould be just like heaven, Polly! but wouldn't it cost money, though!"

"I don't care," said Polly, giving a flounce in her chair, which snapped another thread; "O dear me! I didn't mean to, mammy; well, I wouldn't care how much money it cost, we'd have as much light as we wanted, for once; so!"

"Goodness!" said Mrs. Pepper, "you'd have the house afire! Two hundred candles! who ever heard of such a thing!"

"Would they burn?" asked Phronsie, anxiously, getting up from the floor where she was crouching with David, overseeing Joel nail on the cover of an old box; and going to Polly's side she awaited her answer patiently.

"Burn?" said Polly. "There, that's done now, mamsie dear!" And she put the coat, with a last little pat, into her mother's lap. "I guess they would, Phronsie, pet." And Polly caught up the little girl, and spun round and round the old kitchen till they were both glad to stop.

"Then," said Phronsie, as Polly put her down and stood breathless after her last glorious spin, "I do so wish we might, Polly; oh, just this very one minute!" And Phronsie clasped her fat little hands in rapture at the thought.

"Well," said Polly, giving a look up at the old clock in the corner, "goodness me! it's half-past five; and 'most time for Ben to come home!"

Away she flew to get supper. So for the next moments nothing was heard but the pulling out of the old table into the middle of the floor, the laying of the cloth, and all the other bustle attendant upon the getting ready for Ben. Polly went skipping around, cutting the bread, and bringing dishes; only stopping long enough to fling some scraps of reassuring nonsense to the two boys, who were thoroughly dismayed at being obliged to remove their traps into a corner.

Phronsie still stood just where Polly left her. Two hundred candles! oh! what could it mean! She gazed up to the old beams overhead, and around the dingy walls, and to the old black stove with the fire nearly out, and then over everything the kitchen contained, trying to think how it would seem. To have it bright and winsome and warm! to suit Polly -- "Oh!" she screamed.

"Goodness!" cried Polly, taking her head out of the old cupboard in the corner, "how you scared me, Phronsie!"

"Would they never go out?" asked the child gravely, still standing where Polly left her.

"What?" asked Polly, stopping with a dish of cold potatoes in her hand. "What, Phronsie?"

"Why, the candles," said the child, "the ever-an'-ever so many pretty lights!"

"Oh, my senses!" cried Polly, with a little laugh, "haven't you forgotten that! Yes -- no, that is, Phronsie, if we could have 'em at all, we wouldn't ever let 'em go out!"

"Not once?" asked Phronsie, coming up to Polly with a little skip, and nearly upsetting her, potatoes and all -- "not once, Polly, truly?"

"No, not forever-an'-ever," said Polly; "take care, Phronsie! there goes a potato; no, we'd keep 'em always!"

"No, you don't want to," said Mrs. Pepper, coming out of the bedroom in time to catch the last words; "they won't be good to-morrow; better have them to-night, Polly."

"Ma'am!" said Polly, setting down her potato-dish on the table, and staring at her mother with all her might -- "have what, mother?"

"Why, the potatoes, to be sure," replied Mrs. Pepper; "didn't you say you better keep 'em, child?"

"'Twasn't potatoes -- at all," said Polly, with a little gasp; "'twas -- O dear me! here's Ben!" for the door opened, and Phronsie, with a scream of delight, bounded into Ben's arms.

"It's just jolly," said Ben, coming in, his chubby face all aglow, and his big blue eyes shining so honest and true; "it's just jolly to get home! Supper ready, Polly?"

"Yes," said Polly; "that is -- all but -- " and she dashed off for Phronsie's eating-apron.

"Sometime," said Phronsie, with her mouth half full, when the meal was nearly over, "we're going to be awful rich; we are, Ben, truly!"

"No?" said Ben, affecting the most hearty astonishment. "You don't say so, Chick!"

"Yes," said Phronsie, shaking her yellow head very wisely at him, and diving down into her cup of very weak milk and water to see if Polly had put any sugar in by mistake -- a custom always expectantly observed. "Yes, we are really, Bensie, very dreadful rich!"

"I wish we could be rich now, then," said Ben, taking another generous slice of the brown bread; "in time for mamsie's birthday," and he cast a sorrowful glance at Polly.

"I know," said Polly; "O dear! if we only could celebrate it!"

"I don't want any other celebration," said Mrs. Pepper, beaming on them so that a little flash of sunshine seemed to hop right down on the table, "than to look around on you all; I'm rich now, and that's a fact!"

"Mamsie doesn't mind her five bothers," cried Polly, jumping up and running to hug her mother, thereby producing a like desire in all the others, who immediately left their seats and followed her example.

"Mother's rich enough," ejaculated Mrs. Pepper, her bright, black eyes glistening with delight, as the noisy troop filed back to their bread and potatoes; "if we can only keep together, dears, and grow up good, so that the Little Brown House won't be ashamed of us, that's all I ask."

"Well," said Polly, in a burst of confidence to Ben, after the table had been pushed back against the wall, the dishes nicely washed, wiped, and set up neatly in the cupboard, and all traces of the meal cleared away; "I don't care; let's try to get a celebration, somehow, for mamsie!"

"How are you going to do it?" asked Ben, who was of a decidedly practical turn of mind, and thus couldn't always follow Polly in her flights of imagination.

"I don't know," said Polly; "but we must some way."

"Phoh! that's no good," said Ben, disdainfully; then seeing Polly's face, he added kindly, "let's think, though; and p'r'aps there'll be some way."

"Oh, I know," cried Polly, in delight; "I know the very thing, Ben! let's make her a cake; a big one, you know, and -- "

"She'll see you bake it," said Ben; "or else she'll smell it, and that'd be just as bad."

"No, she won't, 'either," replied Polly. "Don't you know she's going to help Mrs. Henderson to-morrow; so there!"

"So she is," said Ben; "good for you, Polly, you always think of everything!"

"And then," said Polly, with a comfortable little feeling in her heart at Ben's praise, "why, we can have it all out of the way perfectly splendid when she comes home -- and besides, Grandma Bascom'll tell me how. You know we've only got brown flour, Ben; I mean to go right over and ask her now."

"Oh, no, you mustn't," cried Ben, catching hold of her arm as she was preparing to fly off. "Mammy'll find it out; better wait till to-morrow; and besides Polly -- " and Ben stopped, unwilling to dampen this propitious beginning. "The stove'll act like everything, to-morrow! I know 'twill; then what'll you do!"

"It shan't!" said Polly, running up to look it in the face; "if it does, I'll shake it; the mean old thing!"

The idea of Polly's shaking the lumbering old black affair, sent Ben into such a peal of laughter that it brought all the other children running to the spot; and nothing would do, but they must one and all be told the reason. So Polly and Ben took them into confidence, which so elated them that half an hour after, when long past her bedtime, Phronsie declared, "I'm not going to bed! I want to sit up like Polly!"

"Don't tease her," whispered Polly to Ben, who thought she ought to go; so she sat straight up on her little stool, winking like everything to keep awake.

At last, as Polly was in the midst of one of her liveliest sallies, over tumbled Phronsie, a sleepy little heap, right on to the floor.

"I want -- to go -- to bed!" she said; "take me -- Polly!"

"I thought so," laughed Polly, and bundled her off into the bedroom.



Continues...


Excerpted from Five Little Peppers and How They Grew by Margaret Sidney Copyright © 2006 by Margaret Sidney. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Foreword

1 A Home View

2 Making Happiness for Mamsie

3 Mamsie's Birthday

4 Trouble for the Little Brown House

5 More Trouble

6 Hard Days for Polly

7 The Cloud over the Little Brown House

8 Joel's Turn

9 Sunshine Again

10 A Threatened Blow

11 Safe

12 New Friends

13 Phronsie Pays a Debt of Gratitude

14 A Letter to Jasper

15 Jolly Days

16 Getting a Christmas for the Little Ones

17 Christmas Bells!

18 Education Ahead

19 Brave Work and the Reward

20 Polly Is Comforted

21 Phronsie

22 Getting Ready for Mamsie and the Boys

23 Which Treats of a Good Many Matters

24 Polly's Dismal Morning

25 Polly's Big Bundle

An Aladdin Reading Group Guide to Five Little Peppers and How They Grew


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Foe

    For 4th grade

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2012

    Great in the middle and end, kinda good in the beggining

    It was a great book yet the beggining needed a little help, but the rest was truly amazing it teaches a lesson that i will never forget " money is not everything" i totally recomend it for kids 4th grade and up

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A book for a lifetime

    One of my favorite books. Appropriate for preteens and early teenagers. Tells a story of family at the turn of the 19th century in American history when a great many hardships had to be overcome just like with todays families.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 13, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A lovable classic

    I've been reading "Five Little Peppers" over and over again for probably about a decade now. It gives me a window into a time period and a lifestyle that are completely foreign. The story of the five Pepper children and their mother, Mrs. Pepper, trying to eke out a living in post-WWII America is heartwarming, although that sounds cheesy. It's kind of a simplistic tale, but it really makes you feel the way the characters do - their enthusiasm, their despair, the challenges and triumphs of their daily lives spring to life. The relationships that the family members have with each other are what sustains them and ultimately leads them to success. Part of the allure of this book is how wholesome and full of values it is - everyone's heart is in the right place, for fun they tell stories to each other (no video games or TV in sight), and the family's optimism, self-reliance and dedication are boundless. Plus, as with all feel-good stories, of course there's a happy ending. This would be a good choice for anyone ages 8 and up who has read this far and is still interested. :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2005

    Good

    This is a good book for those of us who do not enjoy sinking in the quagmire of Old English, &ct. It has a nice storyline and good characters. It is definantly not my favorite book, however.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2005

    Excellent Book!

    A book about five children who live in poverty, but are still very optomistic about things! Very excellent surprise ending. I truly reccomend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Five little peppers and how they grew

    I have not read this book yet, but have heard that it is very good. My grandma loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 7, 2013

    I turned 60 last week. This is the first book I read over and o

    I turned 60 last week. This is the first book I read over and over and over as a child. Also the sequel as well. I could never get enough of this story. The best kid book ever.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Stupid

    Why would people write about 5 f*****' peppers? Ms.Sidney, you are an a******!!!!~B&N

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2012

    To abstract

    Its fine what did you need to ask

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 17, 2011

    T Bad OCR

    Rendes much of the text gibberish.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2006

    Just read this wonderful book!

    This book gives you a peekhole to look through in the lives of this family. Please read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2003

    The Five Little Peppers And How They Grew

    The Five little peppers And How They Grew is a very charming book. I gave this book four stars! On the plus side it is so sweet the way all the pepper children get along. they care so much about each other. Even though they have no money and are exstrememly poor they have so much love.Margaret Sidney really did a spectactular job on this heartworming story. On the other hand the story can get a little boring at times and you really do not want to keep going but you really should because it is a great book. Also it is kind of old and hard to understand. But those are the only negative things i have to say about The Five Little Peppers And How They Grew. My favorite part of the book is when Polly a child in the story gets a little bird and she loves it so much! I also love when the Pepper children decide to make a cake for their mom who they call mumsie! They have hardly any materials like hood white flour and eggs or butter. But they make a scrumptious cake that everyone loves. That is why i like it so much they take so little and make it seem so grand! I would recamend this book to anyone who likes old fashion books and storys about children. I think most poeple would very much love this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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